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    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Gauss:
    fritz:

    In the days before on-board electronics, racing car rev counters might be fitted with a second needle which would be moved up the scale by the rev counter needle and then stay at the highest rev reading seen until it was manually reset. This could act as a warning to mechanics that an engine had been over-revved in the heat of battle and that a strip-down and repair was imminently called for.

    I've learnt something new. Thanks fritz Smiley

    That is correct. I have it on my 910 which was the evolution of the 906. Fabulous little cars these 904/906/910. 
    Still drivable for mere mortals like us, before they made monsters like the 908 et 917.

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    http://youtu.be/3uKXuxYiWAQ

    A little of what you can expect IRL although it is clearly snapped during the photoshoot.

     

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    sayyaaf:

     

    http://youtu.be/3uKXuxYiWAQ

    A little of what you can expect IRL although it is clearly snapped during the photoshoot.

    ...new Cayman looking good! Smiley

    Smiley SmileySmiley



    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    I really love the new Cayman. Its profile is gorgeous. 

    Cayman S, manual, sport chassis, rear LSD, 19 in wheels, sport bucket seats and sport exhaust. That's it. Perfect little sport car.

    I might buy one.

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Futch:

    I really love the new Cayman. Its profile is gorgeous. 

    Cayman S, manual, sport chassis, rear LSD, 19 in wheels, sport bucket seats and sport exhaust. That's it. Perfect little sport car.

    I might buy one.

    ...how about a Cayman GT3 !?! Smiley

    Porsche plans to launch Cayman R and Cayman GT3...
     

     
    "In the past, the Cayman wasn't allowed to outperform the more profitable 911, but this policy is about to change. Since Porsche has learned that there is virtually no overlap between the two clienteles, we are almost certainly going to see another Cayman R, and there's even talk of a GT3 variant, which could compete in its own junior racing series.
     
    At the other end of the scale, the midcycle makeover expected for late 2015 may yield a new entry-level Cayman powered by a more frugal turbocharged four-cylinder boxer engine. Also said to be in the works are a seven-speed manual gearbox and a wider choice of operating modes modeled after BMW's driving-experience selector and Ferrari's manettino."
     
     -- Article by Georg Kacher (Automobile, February 2013)  
     
    2013 Porsche Cayman and 1966 Porsche 906: The Latest And The Greatest -- Automobile link
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Even better!

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    More and more tempting. About to cause me to break my rule of not buying the first year of a new model...

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Any one know the Cayman S with Sport chrono 0-200 times ?


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    KMM:

    More and more tempting. About to cause me to break my rule of not buying the first year of a new model...

     

    you can start counting from the launch of the Boxster Smiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    bws:
    KMM:

    More and more tempting. About to cause me to break my rule of not buying the first year of a new model...

     

    you can start counting from the launch of the Boxster Smiley

    You're right as far as major components are concerned (engine, gearbox, etc.) However, when it comes to body specific issues, or integration issues, it's a different matter. I'm thinking, for example, about the low frequency booming issue in the early Cayman, caused by the heavy rear hatch moving up and down on its rubber grommets. And the silly solution Porsche came up with after a year or so. (Good thing they moved to a lighter hatch on the new generation).

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Futch:

    I really love the new Cayman. Its profile is gorgeous. 

    Cayman S, manual, sport chassis, rear LSD, 19 in wheels, sport bucket seats and sport exhaust. That's it. Perfect little sport car.

    I might buy one.

     

    No, you won't. Smiley

    Wait for the 991 GT3...amazing car. Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche Panamera Turbo S, Cayenne GTS (958), BMW X3 35d (2012), Mini Cooper S Countryman All4


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    did you see the pictures about 991 gt3?

     

     

    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    No, you won't. Smiley

    Wait for the 991 GT3...amazing car. Smiley

    RC?? Is there something new that you can share with us abuout the GT3?? Mule rear wing or other??


    --


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    RC:
    Futch:

    I really love the new Cayman. Its profile is gorgeous. 

    Cayman S, manual, sport chassis, rear LSD, 19 in wheels, sport bucket seats and sport exhaust. That's it. Perfect little sport car.

    I might buy one.

     

    No, you won't. Smiley

    Wait for the 991 GT3...amazing car. Smiley

     

    What could be the price for the 991 GT3 PDK?


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    2013 Porsche Cayman S at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit...

    2013 Porsche Cayman S at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    New Porsche Cayman at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit...

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Surprisingly good looking in silver. Is that GT-silver or the normal silver.

    I love so see it in white, because this is my favorite color on the new Boxster.


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Any UK members going to the Reading preview on 6 March?


    --

    Gen II Cayman S


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    acky:

    Surprisingly good looking in silver. Is that GT-silver or the normal silver.

    I love so see it in white, because this is my favorite color on the new Boxster.

    I think it's Platinum silver, but the lights on the show look very white so I could be wrong. sunlight brings out the warmer tones in Platinum. 


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    really nice that line , shape and color. i'm impatient to see it at the car show in march

     


    --

     997 GT3,Cayenne S, Cooper S & VW Cross Polo


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Enmanuel:
    acky:

    Surprisingly good looking in silver. Is that GT-silver or the normal silver.

    I love so see it in white, because this is my favorite color on the new Boxster.

    I think it's Platinum silver, but the lights on the show look very white so I could be wrong. sunlight brings out the warmer tones in Platinum. 


    I also believe that it is Platinum. Those SportTechno rims are regularly painted in GT-silver and they appear in a slightly different hue on those pictures and videos.


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    I've just had the invitation from them but as I've only had my 981S since June last year I'm not sure if i'll go - its always such a bun fight and I've not been that impressed with Reading this time round.


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Some real-life images...
    porsche-cayman-s-2013-c863703022013115424_5.jpgporsche-cayman-s-2013-c863703022013115424_7.jpg

    porsche-cayman-s-2013-c863703022013115424_1.jpgporsche-cayman-s-2013-c863703022013115424_4.jpg


    --

    Current: 991 C2S Basalt Black/Black - PDK, PSE, SPASM, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.2 C2S Meteor Grey/Black - PDK, PSE, LSD, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.1 C2S Black/Black - PSE, PCCB, -20mm/LSD, Short-shifter, SportChrono, etc.


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    kiss


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    needs the exterior painted body option imo.

     

    if you ask me, that dead on rear shot you took makes it look a lot like a Panamera


    --

    2012 991 C2S -PDK / 2010 997.2 turbo cab manual, sold / 2008 Cayenne GTS Manual /2008 RS 60 sold /04 C4S sold - 08 Cayenne Turbo PDCC sold


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    Porsche Cayman S first drive review by Autocar...

     
    The Porsche Cayman S provides an alluring combination of power, balance, fluidity, quality and price to make it the best value driver’s car on sale right now...
     
    (8 February 2013)
     
    What is it?
     
    Twenty three thousand pounds. That is the figure you must not lose track of when reading this first drive of the second-generation Porsche Cayman. It refers to the price difference between the new range topping Cayman S driven here and the latest 911 Carrera, whose 3.4-litre flat six-cylinder boxer engine it shares, if in lightly detuned guise. 
     
    Yes, the pricing of the new Cayman S is aggressive. With a base sticker of £48,783 it is little changed from that of its predecessor. Among its more keener two-door rivals is the Audi TT RS Quattro at £48,120. But it is the £77,449 Porsche 911 Carrera against which it must surely be compared.
     
    Seeing it away from a motor show stand for the first time only serves to reinforce early impressions of just what a good looking car it is. As with its Porsche Boxster sibling, the new coupé adopts an edgier appearance, with tauter surfacing and crisper lines, as well as a noticeably sleeker profile. 
     
    The wheelhouses have also increased in size, allowing Porsche to fit the Cayman S with 19-inch wheels as standard and offer 20s as an option. Among the features helping to distinguish the new Cayman from the year-old Boxster are daytime running lights and indicators housed within a round unit within the front bumper, more pronounced rear haunches and a heavily angled liftback at the rear.
     
    Length is up by 35mm, width extends by 1mm while height drops by 10mm over its predecessor at 4380mm, 1801mm and 1295mm respectively. The Cayman also rides on a 30mm longer wheelbase at 2475mm, while the track widths have increased by 40mm to 1526mm at the front and by 18mm to 1540mm at the rear. 
     
    As part of Porsche’s focus on weight saving, the body is now predominantly aluminium, with the rest fashioned from a combination of magnesium and hot formed high-strength steel. Porsche is claiming a 25kg saving in the body structure, although the added dimensions and a larger interior mean overall kerb weight has crept up marginally.
     
    What is it like?
     
    Few car makers understand basic ergonomics quite as well as Porsche. The Cayman’s driving position is beyond criticism, supported by additional levels of steering wheel and seat adjustment owing to a stretch in overall cabin length. You’re immediately aware of greater levels of accommodation, particularly shoulder room. Visibility is also quite sound, thanks in part to a more cab-forward design and larger rear three quarter windows. 
     
    Porsche has worked hard to provide the new Cayman with a richer and more visually inviting interior than its predecessor. It is all carried over from the Boxster, of course, but that doesn’t distract from it in any way. Broader and more heavily contoured seats add to comfort levels while providing added levels of support. It’s still a two seat layout, although it is now imminently more practical. 
     
    There is greater oddment stowage space, too, and the deep front luggage compartment is reasonably sized at 150 litres. The shallow rear luggage shelf behind the seats at 162 litres is less practical, but it’s welcome all the same. 
     
    Apart from the superb ergonomics, it is the quality that really stands out. It says a lot that in other Porsche models costing twice as much the perceived fit and finish is much the same. The only criticism we have is its adoption of an electrically operated handbrake whose switch is unnecessarily hidden within the outer edge of the dashboard. They call it progress…
     
    Having spent a good deal of time in the mechanically identical Boxster over the past year, we suspected the Cayman would be a step beyond its predecessor in accelerative potential. And it doesn’t disappoint. The initial range topping S model driven here runs a revised version of the old model’s 3.4-litre flat six engine – as used in the latest 911 Carrera, albeit in a higher state of tune. 
     
    The short stroke unit, endowed with constantly variable valve timing and valve lift and a second induction system to enable it to breathe both through both the air ducts incorporated into the bodywork behind the doors, kicks out an additional 5bhp, delivering 320bhp at 7400rpm. Torque is up by 5lb ft, swelling to 270lb ft at 5800rpm, or 1300rpm higher than before.
     
    They’re hardly class-leading figures, and intentionally suppressed so as not to allow the Cayman S to encroach too much upon the more profitable 911 Carrera. But thanks to Porsche’s efforts in suppressing weight to 1350kg, the new Cayman boasts a power-to-weight ratio of 237bhp per tonne. 
     
    The engine now features a Sport mode as standard. Activated via a switch on the centre console, it alters the throttle response through the adoption of remapped electronics. A six-speed manual gearbox continues as standard, with a seven speed dual clutch unit with shift paddles, as fitted to our test car, key among a long list of options. 
     
    Other options include the Sport Chrono package, which brings dynamic engine mounts that constantly alter their stiffness and damping characteristics to reduce load change for more neutral handling. A further must-have is the optional sports exhaust, if only for the added aural entertainment it brings. 
     
    Response, flexibility, smoothness are central to the engine’s appeal. There is a pleasing immediacy to the delivery at lower revs range. But it is through the midrange and up high where it is at its most engaging – and it’s nothing less than brilliant. The revised engine demands more revs, but that only extends its allure. 
     
    The truly compelling factor with the new Cayman S is just how much performance you get for your money, particularly with the optional dual clutch gearbox and sport chrono package. So configured, it will accelerate from 0 to 62mph in 4.7sec, 0 to 124mph in 16.9sec and reach a claimed 175mph. 
     
    The inherent liveliness these figures allude to is fully present when the Cayman S is given sufficient room to move and there’s never any doubt about its ability to carry its revs to the 7600rpm redline, such is the voracity of the delivery. 
     
    The changes to the chassis also provide added levels of straight line stability and a calmer feel to the steering. Above 150mph there is a lightness to the front owing to positive lift, but while it knocks your confidence initially it never becomes unmanageable. 
     
    The Cayman S is, by class standards, fast. But the gains in straightline potential over its predecessor can’t all be directed at its reworked engine. The optional seven speed dual clutch gearbox also plays a pivotal role.
     
    On the one hand, it endows the new coupe with the sort of relaxed usability that makes it a highly desirable everyday proposition, providing excellent part throttle operation in stop and go traffic. But it is the decisive action of the shifts when you switch to manual mode that leaves us in no doubt that it will be the preferred choice of gearbox. 
     
    With contemporary fuel saving features such as automatic stop/start and brake energy recuperation as well as a coasting function all coming as standard, the Cayman S’s combined cycle fuel economy has improved by a creditable 4.6mpg to 35.3mpg in combination with the dual clutch ’box. It also reduces average CO2 emissions from 221g/km to 188g/km. 
     
    After flinging the Cayman down a broad six-lane autobahn, we headed on to some brilliantly smooth mountain roads south of Stuttgart. But even before reaching the first corner, we’d already made some interesting observations. 
     
    Firstly, it is easily placed on the road. Despite its larger dimensions, it rarely feels any bigger than the old Cayman. The newly adopted electro-mechanical steering is tremendously engaging. It might lack the subtle feedback that characterized the earlier hydraulic system but what it lacks in ultimate communication, it more than makes up for in consistency of weighting, eagerness to self centre and sheer directness. There’s also a new found calmness that makes the new car less demanding when driven hard for long periods. 
     
    In line with German regulations, our test car came shod on high performance winter tyres, a set of 19-inch Michelin Pilot Sport A/S in the same 235/40 and 265/40 profile as the regular pneus. But even they couldn’t mask the breathtaking delicacy, astonishing agility and sheer composure of the Cayman‘s handling, which unquestionably remains the benchmark in the class.
     
    We were fully expecting the new coupé to be a little special in the dynamic department. But it is safe to say that the admittedly highly specified example you see pictured here exceeded all our expectations by a good margin. 
     
    On dry roads, grip is never in doubt. Its stance through fast corners is terrifically neutral, helped tremendously by the ability of the body to resist roll. The inclusion of torque vectoring, which uses the stability management to provide individual braking to the rear wheels, helps to extend the dynamic envelope, providing the basis for added poise and improved balance, without detracting from the driving experience in any way. In combination with the locking differential, it also provides tremendous drive out of corners, allowing you to get on the throttle early without fear of some backwards led reprisal. 
     
    More accomplished, then, but it is far from clinical. Turning off the various driving aids exposes the inherent balance and ability to hang out the tail, revealing just how entertaining the Cayman will prove on the track.
     
    The really striking aspect, though, is just how undemanding it is at the sort of speeds that would have rivals struggling. The Cayman manages to achieve such lofty standards of handling prowess with a ride that is surprisingly supple and more cosseting than that of its predecessor.
     
    The active suspension management system can be credited with some of the progress here. It is a clear improvement on the old arrangement, which we already held in fairly high stead. The longer wheelbase no doubt helps, too. 
     
    Should I buy one?
     
    It’s rare that a car moves us as much as the new Cayman S has – at least on first acquaintance. 
     
    With more power, compelling looks, sharper handling, improved comfort, a sumptuous interior and added practicality, it is a clear improvement on its predecessor in every discernible area. 
     
    Dare I say, it is the best car Porsche builds right now, and at twenty three thousand less than the 911 Carrera, terrific value. 
     
    Porsche Cayman S
     
    Price £48,783; 0-62mph 4.7sec; Top speed 175mph; Economy 35.3mpg (combined); CO2 188g/km; Kerb weight 1350kg; Engine 6-cyl, horizontally-opposed, 3436cc petrol; Installation mid, longitudinal, RWD; Power 320bhp at 7400rpm; Torque 270lb ft at 5800rpm; Gearbox 7-spd dual-clutch auto
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Porsche Cayman S -- First Drive Video by Autocar
     
     

    Porsche Cayman S -- First Drive -- Autocar Link

    Porsche Cayman S -- First Drive -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    New Porsche Cayman driven by Sport Auto...

    ...including the new Sport Auto "snow drift" track test! Smiley

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    New Porsche Cayman driven by Autobild...

    "Starker and faster, lighter and more fuel efficient, more spacious and sleek yet still drawn - that sends Porsche now the third generation of the Cayman into the race..."

    Porsche Cayman driven by Autobild -- Article Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New Cayman (2012)

    2014 Porsche Cayman S driven by Edmunds...

    "Lighter, Faster and That Much Closer to the 911"

    (8 February 2013)
     
    Some cars — namely the really good ones — have it all together right from the start: the moment you fire the engine, select 1st gear and set off down the road.
     
    The new, second-generation 2014 Porsche Cayman S is one of those cars.
     
    But you don't have to wait until you've unlocked the driver's door, slid your backside across the heavily contoured seat and turned the key to discover just what a compelling car it is.
     
    Even before we had drawn the frameless door open and climbed in, we already had an inkling that the new two-seat coupe had what it would take to build on the haughty reputation of its predecessor, still one of the finest driver's cars going some 6.5 years after it was added to the Porsche lineup.
     
    This Porsche Cayman Looks the Part
     
    Up close in the metal, the 2014 Porsche Cayman S is stunning. The overall design is significantly more mature than on the first-generation Cayman, with superbly executed elements such as the crease line running through the door and the automatically deploying rear spoiler — all set to be mirrored on the upcoming 918 Spyder due out in September. Its confident and self-assured stance make this Cayman look exactly like a sports car should.
     
    As with the latest Boxster, the new Porsche Cayman receives slightly altered proportions that serve to give it a more cab-forward silhouette. Length is up by 1.4 inches to 172.4 inches, width remains the same at 70.9 inches and height drops by 0.4 inch to 51 inches.
     
    The new Porsche also rides on a chassis boasting a 1.2-inch-longer wheelbase at 97.4 inches and the tracks have been pushed out by 1.6 inches to 50.1 inches at the front and 0.7 inch to 60.6 inches at the rear to provide it with a significantly larger footprint. The wheelhouses are also bigger to swallow the standard 19-inch wheels with 235/40 tires in front and 265/40 tires in back.
     
    Porsche has also revised the construction of the Cayman in a bid aimed at offsetting the increase in dimensions with a reduction in weight. As with the new Boxster, the body is no longer made exclusively out of steel. Instead, it uses a combination of aluminum, magnesium and steel, which drops the overall weight of the car to 2,976 pounds, a 55-pound reduction versus the previous Cayman S.
     
    The Flat-6s Remain
     
    As with the first-generation Porsche Cayman, buyers have an initial choice of two naturally aspirated horizontally opposed water-cooled six-cylinder engines. The $52,600 Cayman base model receives a newly developed 2.7-liter unit complete with direct fuel injection that boosts power output to 275 horsepower at 7,400 rpm, a 10 hp bump up from the previous 2.9-liter base engine. Torque, however, drops by 7 pound-feet for a total of 214 lb-ft at 4,500 rpm.
     
    The model driven here is the $63,800 Cayman S, which gets a revised 3.4-liter version of Porsche's classic boxer engine. Various tweaks to the induction system result in output numbers of 325 hp and 272 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm.
     
    Both engines come standard with a six-speed manual gearbox, although Porsche expects the optional seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox with steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters will prove the more popular choice over time: and with good reason. The latest software update has improved the quality and speed of its shifts to a point where it is now one of the best units of its type in any car. Purists will still hanker for the manual, if only out of habit, but the dual-clutch gearbox is now clearly the better choice, both in everyday and track-oriented driving.
     
    A Livelier Feel
     
    The 3.4-liter engine really does deliver the best of both worlds, providing for docile part-throttle traits in an everyday city driving environment and captivating liveliness when the conditions allow, particularly above 4,000 rpm where the camshaft profile is noticeably altered and it really begins to deliver.
     
    Significantly, the points at where peak power and torque are delivered have risen by 700 rpm and 1,300 rpm respectively, endowing the revised engine with a slightly peakier delivery than in the old Cayman S. Its character hasn't changed in any great way, but there is now even more reason to explore the upper end. The best attribute, the one that sticks in your memory well after you've climbed out, remains the sound it makes at wide-open throttle. Changes to the induction and exhaust system have enhanced what was already a stirring soundtrack, providing the Cayman S with the aural attributes to back up its exceptional dynamic characteristics.
     
    It is not supercar quick in a straight line, but the performance you get for the money with the 2014 Porsche Cayman S is rather compelling. Porsche claims zero to 62 mph in 4.7 seconds in combination with the dual-clutch gearbox and Sport Chrono package, which brings a launch control feature. This is 0.4 second faster than the old model and just 0.1 second shy of a similarly specified 911 Carrera, which runs the same engine but in a slightly higher state of tune. Top speed extends to 175 mph, achieved at the 7,600 rpm redline in 6th gear owing to the widely overdriven 0.62:1 ratio used in the seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox.
     
    A More Modern Chassis
     
    With its engine mounted low down wholly within the wheelbase and the majority of its weight concentrated over the rear wheels, the Cayman has never lacked for traction. However, Porsche has seen ways to improve it. The new model receives a revised version of its predecessor's stability control function and, for the first time, an optional torque-vectoring system. It's capable of juggling the amount of drive being sent to each of the rear wheels as part of a rear locking differential that offers 27 percent lockup under load and 22 percent lockup under deceleration.
     
    As with much of the new Cayman save for its driveline, the chassis has been heavily updated. It continues to use a suspension with struts both front and rear, although they have been redesigned, making them more compact, stiffer and better able to maintain a constant camber for more precise handling. The subframes to which the suspension is attached are also new, offering greater dispersion of shock throughout the body structure, which is claimed to boast an impressive 40 percent increase in overall rigidity.
     
    Other changes include an improved optional active suspension management system. With four vertical sensors, it provides faster and more intuitive changes in damping control. The driver can choose between Normal and Sport, which provide moderate and higher damping forces, respectively. A bigger change is the adoption of electromechanical steering in place of the wonderfully communicative hydraulic-mechanical setup used on the old Cayman.
     
    Bigger Size Doesn't Compromise Handling
     
    The lingering concern was that in adopting a larger chassis — and with it larger wheels, tires and brakes — the Cayman may lose some of its valued intimacy. However, this proves unfounded. The new model is, if nothing else, more encouraging to drive, both in an everyday sense and close to its dynamic limit. There is a completeness to its handling repertoire that makes the new car special. In isolation it feels more engaging than the 911 Carrera, at least in Cayman S form.
     
    The steering, for a start, is wonderfully weighted, if slightly lacking in ultimate feedback. But it is the chassis that really shines, as its actions are superbly responsive. There's proper compliance and it is never harsh, even on badly pitted pavement when the dampers are switched to Sport mode. You can feel the detail of the engineering that has gone into it with every turn of the steering wheel. The brakes, with optional 13.8-inch carbon-ceramic rotors grabbed by a new six-piston caliper up front and four-piston caliper at the rear on our test car, are beyond criticism, providing stunning stopping power at any speed.
     
    This Cayman hasn't lost any of its ability to entertain, either. Switch off the stability control system and it will oblige, with progressive drifts there for the taking in the right conditions. It takes a fair bit of provocation to get the rear end to really step out, though. Could it handle more power? Of course, the chassis feels to have loads in reserve. Just don't expect the Cayman to encroach too much upon the 911 for outright firepower any time soon. Porsche policy has always been to keep the two firmly separated.
     
    A Good Problem To Have
     
    One thing is for certain. Porsche needn't worry too much about the Cayman S facing much in the way of direct two-door competition. The Audi TT RS coupe has the juice to rival it in a straight line but it lacks its handling finesse. The same could be said of the Nissan 370Z. The Jaguar F-Type is just around the corner but it remains to be seen just how well it will stack up.
     
    That leaves the 911 Carrera as perhaps the keenest adversary. But given the advances shown by the new 2014 Porsche Cayman S, even it is looking a little off the pace. Then consider that the 911 costs $20,500 more and the Cayman once again looks like the car in Porsche's lineup for the most hard-core of enthusiasts.
     
     
     
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


     
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