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    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Credits at the end mention "Retusche: Larson". So a Photoshop, although Larson appears pretty talented.

     


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    2019 Porsche 992 911 Carrera S prototype review

    -- Review by Georg Kacher, 11 November 2018

    The Porsche 911 is now well and truly a modern entity. Through its generations Stuttgart has thrown everything at its concept that shouldn’t work – but very much does.

    Technology and computer-controlled assets mean that the rear-engined concept is now faster, more efficient and, most of all, more fun to drive than ever. We got a taste of what’s next with a bunch of pre-production cars more than half a year before the quintessential new model goes on sale globally.

    The nine-eleven has had many lives and all combine a mixture of constants and variables. There is still that charismatic flat-six hanging out the back, past the rear axle, meaning the overall weight distribution seems impossible, but it works. And after all these years, the same underlying personality continues to be deliciously tangible.

    The seventh 911, dubbed 992, is a thorough evolution of the preceding 991 generation. However, it’s not a ground-up new car. There was no need to go the full distance. After all, the predecessor is still remarkably inspiring and involving kit – you’d be foolish to think otherwise. Not surprisingly, then, Porsche decided to hone and tweak the proven DNA rather than recalibrate it.

    Interestingly, this time around the design and engineering departments took a backseat in terms of priority. Instead, advancing ergonomics, implementing new driver assistance systems and further reducing emissions was at the forefront of the next generation. Yet, as we found out, that doesn’t mean the seventh-gen 911 has lost its way.

    Initially, the 911 will be available for order as the base Carrera and the Carrera S. Marketing played a long and hard game with the positioning of the two models, eventually rating the lesser 3.0-litre engine at 283kW and not 294kW (leaving plenty of headroom).

    The S we drove is good for 331kW – which, ironically, is the output of the current-gen GTS. You also have the choice of a new eight-speed PDK or a revised version of the seven-speed manual.

    The twin-turbo unit redlines at 7500rpm, maximum torque is a healthy 550Nm (S) and the fuel-consumption hasn’t increased despite the addition of an energy-sapping particulate filter. It’s all pointing towards the Carrera S being no slouch. And it isn’t.

    With launch control activated, the PDK version can accelerate to 100km/h in a brisk 3.7 seconds and remember, this isn’t a ‘fast one’. It’ll also go on to a top speed of 309km/h, which should be plenty for most occasions. In a nutshell, the new Carrera S performs as well as the outgoing GTS, that’s how far the 992 shifts its performance game.

    At a glance, the 992 is everything but a head-turner. Sure, all the traditional cues are there – this is a 911 after all – yet there are delights to be found in the details. If you look closely you can spot the contrasting black bumper inserts front and rear, the extra dose of Botox and filler for the guards and wider rims.

    Then there’s the new, fancier three-part pop-up rear spoiler – thanks, Panamera. More cooling is now being channelled to the brakes and the radiators via slim, horizontal intakes that can selectively block off certain louvres. And then there’s the full-length tail-light, which delights as many as it annoys.

    However, it’s time to look away from the spec sheet and actually drive the thing. And for a change, given this is a ‘new’ car, there’s not much familiarisation required. Sliding into the driver’s seat feels like putting on one’s favourite slippers. The pivotal controls are still in the same positions, the clutch action still varies from velvety to almost violent and the throttle response is still as keen as ever. 

    The most obvious dynamic difference is the boost in power and torque, followed by the unexpectedly muffled exhaust note and the somewhat smoother (subjective) running characteristics. From the off it’s easy to tell the 992 is, at least for the first few kays, more of a cruiser than a bruiser. But don’t fret, because there’s more sinister alter egos to uncover, ones that play to the old 911’s school of thought.

    The drive loop takes us through amazing ribbons of tarmac in the Northern Californian hinterland. Whoever designed these roads must have loved driving because this area is filled with winding corners, blind crests, spoiler-chewing dives, crumbling blacktop and hard shoulders that sporadically soften. It’s a true test of the 992’s wares. It’d be a tough test for any performance car, and yet it feels like home turf for the updated 911. It delivers the goods with verve and vivacity.

    Sitting in the passenger seat is August Achleitner, R&D chief of the sports car division and a hardcore Porsche veteran. “We are offering again a choice of transmissions, a seven-speed manual and a new eight-speed PDK which packages plug-in hybrid componentry should we ever decide to go that way,” Achleitner tells MOTOR. “Although one must prepare for all eventualities, weight and complexity remain tall hurdles.”

    In the 991, the seven-speed ’box was a counter-productive and frustrating attempt to come to grips with emissions regulations. In the 992, at least the shift quality has markedly improved. That last shift from sixth into seventh is no longer a haptic game of chance. Although having said that, even the modified manual can’t quite match the slick and precise movements of the six-speeder available in the GT3.

    The optional rear-wheel steering doubles the competency and excitement factor. It’s a more robust experience. Turn-in is reassuring with the chassis and tyre grip joining forces while the steering and throttle establish a super smooth handling balance.

    Without steering added to the rear axle, the new 911 feels rawer and edgier as it revels in its inherently tail-happy self. We’d be inclined to choose either the conventional manual sans the extra steering, or the PDK with rear steer.

    After more than an hour of spirited driving, the car and the driver finally begin to gel and form a common flow. There is no doubt about it, this 911 moves in a more compliant, yet also more aggressive manner. It can go at a faster pace and it hangs on for quite a bit longer. Its biggest individual dynamic improvement is the extra front-end bite, which allows for higher apex speed and a broader sweet spot at the limit.

    “The 992 builds up quantifiably more mechanical grip than the 991”, says Achleitner. “The adjustable Bilstein dampers cover a broader range of action, the new passive engine mounts take the sting out of lift-off manoeuvres, the steering ratio is about 5 percent quicker. Little things perhaps, but on aggregate they do make a difference. While the manual cars come with a mechanical diff lock, the PDK models boast an electronically controlled side-to-side torque distribution.”

    While the Carrera comes with 18- and 19-inch wheels, the S is shod with 245/35 ZR20 tyres up front and 305/30 ZR21 Pirelli P Zeros at the back. With the grunt underfoot, all hell would break loose if it wasn’t for the host of traction aids. There’s even tech confined within the front wheel arches that acts as multi-stage rain and ice sensors – clever, that. Sadly, a software glitch prevented us from fully deactivating the ESP.

    Ultimately, a handily specified 992 can do much more than merely accelerate swiftly, steer accurately and brake promptly. It can answer the driver’s every dynamic whim by adjusting the damper action, the ESP mode or the throttle response.

    The 911 now has five different levels of excitement to tune the various parameters. Tap the big screen and those options will pop up. They are labelled Wet, Normal, Sport, Sport Plus and Individual. Gone are the direct access buttons next to the gear lever, so every single menu and submenu needs to be opened via the main display. Surely the old-fashioned way would have been better here. No?

    Finding fault with the seventh-gen 911 is nit-picking at its finest. However, the tuning of the PDK ’box when it is in Normal mode is too dozy, a clear sign that economy and emissions factors came into play. Conversely, in Sport and Sport Plus, high-revving hooliganisms are once again the name of the hectic game. Yet still, when stationary and flooring the throttle, revs are capped at 3500rpm – strange indeed.

    Inside, the new 911 welcomes you with a different blend of fashion and function. The fascia looks familiar, bit it is actually quite a sophisticated new design. The central rev counter still swings an analogue needle and, somewhat refreshingly, you still need to turn a key in the ignition. However, when the flat-six fires into life, four of the five round dials are now digital and freely programmable. They’re quite complex as far as the depth of their talent goes.

    High in the centre console resides a large touchscreen, which invites you to zoom, scroll and swipe (thanks to the Panamera and Cayenne). Finger training also comes in handy when operating the new multi-function steering wheel. The rotary thumb wheel remains with the boost option ready to push at will.

    Ultimately, the take-home story to the new 992 is this. The seventh generation directs a greater portion of its enhanced, high-tech content towards convenience and comfort. Thankfully, it does so without compromising the core qualities that have made this sports car a legend in its own right. It’s a pragmatic evolution that’s not devoid of emotion.

    Now that’s progress.

    FAST FACTS 
    2018 Porsche 992 911 Carrera S prototype

    BODY: 2-door, 2+2-seat coupe
    DRIVE: rear-wheel
    ENGINE: 2981 flat-6cyl, DOHC, 24v, twin-turbo
    POWER: 331kW
    TORQUE: 550Nm
    WEIGHT: 1460kg (estimated)
    POWER-TO-WEIGHT: 227kW/tonne
    TRANSMISSION: 8-speed dual-clutch 
    STEERING: electrically-assisted rack-and-pinion

    PROS: Increased comfort/tech; PDK; speed; handling
    CONS: Normal mode too lazy; cabin ergonomics
    RATING: 4.5 out of 5 stars

    Porsche 991 v 992 - Five key differences 

    01/Stop the press 
    Carrera S gets bigger brakes with Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) - carbons optional 

    02/Cabin fever
    Next-gen 911 benefits from new infotainment and a digital dash for the first time

    03/Weight issue
    It would have been nice to keep the kerb weight where it was, but at the end of the day all those mod cons and the beefier footwear added 20kg to the tally

    04/Size matters
    The revised aerodynamics package means the 992 is now 40mm wider and 20mm longer than the outgoing generation

    05/Gear change
    Plucked from the Panamera, the 992 gains an eight-speed PDK

    Link: https://www.whichcar.com.au/reviews/2019-porsche-992-911-carrera-s-prototype-review


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Thx  kiss


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    7th Generation??? I´m pretty sure the 992 it´s the 8th Generation 911.

    (...)there’s the full-length tail-light, which delights as many as it annoys."

    Annoying it´s the fact that almost every other brand copying Porsche. Do people forget that a red strip/reflector has been on 911´s since, i dont know, 1974 with some exceptions?

    1974 - 1998 (G Model, 964 & 993)

    2001 - 2005 (996 c4s)

    2008 - 2012 - (997.2 C4s)

    2013 - 2018 (991 4WD Models and Iluminated)

    Hum....

     

     


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    This is the way this post ends, not with a bang but with a wisper, WOSHHHHHHHHHHHHH


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    chuckb:

    RL is slowly becoming a place for the uniformed to repost misinformation. 

    And raising the bar as nonsense (to be polite) goes.


    --

    This is the way this post ends, not with a bang but with a wisper, WOSHHHHHHHHHHHHH


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Good review by Kacher. Agree that normal mode in new 8 speed PDK is dozy (as in my 2018 PT).  Agree with his analysis of pragmatic progress, mostly focusing on comfort and convenience, not design and major power bump.   Some customers will  appreciate the convenience and comfort, others will view it as a sell out. Porsche marketing, lap times, new car excitement will add to the new car’s appeal.

    I doubt that 911s fit into my lifestyle anymore, and I remain a bit bored with the “iconic” shape, but I think this car will be a good advancement for the series.


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    44290197_350383372200081_4741040465006500604_n.jpg
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    This is the way this post ends, not with a bang but with a wisper, WOSHHHHHHHHHHHHH


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Mah, these comments by Kacher leave me skeptic. But i am willing to be proved wrong if the car clearly ourperforms the 991.2 in the Sport Auto test. Pity though that in order to get a more ‘raw’ 911 one has to order a GT3 - at an unreasonable price (and no back seats which is a no go for me!). 

    Additionally this is now a mass produced car selling for 200k (at least here in Switzerland) , which is nuts. You can almost bring home a year old 488 for that money... 
    --

     

    turbolite

     


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Not being able to order a GT3 touring with rear seats and PDK is stupid


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    SciFrog:

    Not being able to order a GT3 touring with rear seats and PDK is stupid

    x2, these restrictions are stupid, if they have the parts readily available and fit easily, why not let the customer decide? 

    Rear seats cushions and seat belts are not making the car a Planck time slower, absolutely no drawbacks to the car. And opting a GT3 with PDK is as respectable as in the RS or any other 911 (I'd spec it manual myself but don't see why others cannot have it with PDK). It is all only about maintaining an image, which is shallow IMO, these cars are for "driving not posing.


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Carlos from Spain:
    SciFrog:

    Not being able to order a GT3 touring with rear seats and PDK is stupid

    x2, these restrictions are stupid, if they have the parts readily available and fit easily, why not let the customer decide? 

    They're saving that combination for the GT3 Touring Comfort Package and charging you $11,000 for it. 


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Here in the US you simply bolt in the parts. Lol. 


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Enmanuel:
    Carlos from Spain:
    SciFrog:

    Not being able to order a GT3 touring with rear seats and PDK is stupid

    x2, these restrictions are stupid, if they have the parts readily available and fit easily, why not let the customer decide? 

    They're saving that combination for the GT3 Touring Comfort Package and charging you $11,000 for it. 

    Smiley


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Carlos from Spain:
    SciFrog:

    Not being able to order a GT3 touring with rear seats and PDK is stupid

    x2, these restrictions are stupid, if they have the parts readily available and fit easily, why not let the customer decide? 

    Rear seats cushions and seat belts are not making the car a Planck time slower, absolutely no drawbacks to the car. And opting a GT3 with PDK is as respectable as in the RS or any other 911 (I'd spec it manual myself but don't see why others cannot have it with PDK). It is all only about maintaining an image, which is shallow IMO, these cars are for "driving not posing.

    Carlos, are you coming to any conclusions re. a replacement path for your 991 in all of this 992 news?  At your famous rate of accumulating km, you will be well over 100k soon if not already, and I never see you in (oh, lets just say) an R8....Smiley


    --

    2017 Range Rover Sport S/C,  2009 Porsche 911S


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Leawood911:

    Here in the US you simply bolt in the parts. Lol. 

    Except for the fact that we can’t bolt in the Clubsport rollcage, since they remove the mounting point for US carsSmiley


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    1542011860273image.jpeg

    ...wonder if the LA Auto Show might have a Porsche 992 "concept" as a preview? Smiley

     


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    The car looks much better without that PORSCHE sign in the middle of the back strip  and even bette when there is the tape that flattens that cut in strip !


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    turbolite:

    Mah, these comments by Kacher leave me skeptic. But i am willing to be proved wrong if the car clearly ourperforms the 991.2 in the Sport Auto test. Pity though that in order to get a more ‘raw’ 911 one has to order a GT3 - at an unreasonable price (and no back seats which is a no go for me!). 

    Additionally this is now a mass produced car selling for 200k (at least here in Switzerland) , which is nuts. You can almost bring home a year old 488 for that money... 
    --

    The running costs of Ferrari are much higher than Porsche i.e. servicing costs, spare parts, body parts, fuel and in most places insurance and road tax . Besides the Porsche available with AWD is a year round car where the weather requires.

    Do you know of anyone who covers even 10.000km per year in a Ferrari. Costs, fear of depreciation and unsuitability for anything other than a fast spin once in a while.

    The Ferrari is a "supercar"  for short time gratification, the 911 is one of the most accomplished sportscars which can be used daily and all year long, a companion.

    I don't think a 488 is a substitute for a 911, even for a Turbo S and vice versa.

     


    --

    "Porsche....and Nothing else matters"


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    bluelines:
    DaveGordon:
    chuckb:

    RL is slowly becoming a place for the uniformed to repost misinformation. 

    OK, can’t argue with that indecision

    I just wish I could get some real info to plan around. Is that too much to ask?

    They won’t sell you one anyway SmileySmileySmiley

    You are mean... Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    1542011860273image.jpeg

    ...wonder if the LA Auto Show might have a Porsche 992 "concept" as a previewSmiley

     

    Wasn't Porsche supposed to show the final product in LA? Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    4trac:
    Carlos from Spain:
     

    Carlos, are you coming to any conclusions re. a replacement path for your 991 in all of this 992 news?  At your famous rate of accumulating km, you will be well over 100k soon if not already, and I never see you in (oh, lets just say) an R8....Smiley

    I'm afraid I'm at a loss right now, the small turbocharged engine would be a significant step back for me, sure it has more power but few instances I would really take full advantage of it if we stop to think about it, it is not a track car, on a commute or mountain road driving I wouldn't be any slower, yet I would loose significantly in terms of enjoyment and experience due to the the throttle directness and engine reving NA character, and the engine soundtrack. That I use 100% of the time. While Porsche did a fantastic job reducing those aspects in the 3.0LTurbo, they are still noticeable, especially for someone coming from the 3.8L NA. Just the sound is a big difference.

    I don't see any groundbreaking changes in the 992 to compensate for that, so for the first time in almost 20 years of driving a 911 daily, I don't have an option available yet for when I change 911. The GT3 is not really a sensible option for a daily with the amount of Km I drive it not use. .

    Outside Porche I see no options that will improve my experience, an R8 has a great NA engine but it is too flashy, and not a daily driver. Also I want rear seats, I  rarely use them but I guess its a psychological thing that I want them.

    The good thing is that the  991.1 GTS is the best 911 I ever owned, actually the best have ever driven for daily & weekend combo usage. So I really enjoy it and have no urgency of trading it in for another one, but I put a lot of miles on it an won't last for ever.

    Fortunately, it has been rock solid and reliable, it has almost 90,000Km and feels like new, looks new as well save for the stone chips of those miles.So I'm not motivated to change by that aspect either.

    I guess I'll  wind up with a turbocharged 992 GTS at sometime, don't see a hybrid-NA 992 on the horizon coming soon enough, so instead of trying to trade-up as soon as possible, this time I will post-pone it as much as I can.


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Normally aspirated will be forgotten like air-cooled has been forgotten.

    IMO for a daily car with a 911 size of n/a engine the torque of turbocharging is more useful than the high revs of the n/a engine.

    Sure the crescendo when  revving the n/a engine high is nice but low down torque counts for more in daily drives plus you can be faster more easily.


    --

    "Porsche....and Nothing else matters"


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    reginos:

    Normally aspirated will be forgotten like air-cooled has been forgotten.

    IMO for a daily car with a 911 size of n/a engine the torque of turbocharging is more useful than the high revs of the n/a engine.

    Sure the crescendo when  revving the n/a engine high is nice but low down torque counts for more in daily drives plus you can be faster more easily.

    This is about driving fun, not necessarily power or torque. High revving engines are lots of fun, I didn't realize this until I actually got one. I would, in a heartbeat, take a n/a V10 over any turbo charged 8-cyl. with more power and/or torque. 

    In a daily driver, a turbo charged engine is probably better (more comfortable) but for a weekend fun car? N/a all the way.


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    reginos:

    Normally aspirated will be forgotten like air-cooled has been forgotten.

    IMO for a daily car with a 911 size of n/a engine the torque of turbocharging is more useful than the high revs of the n/a engine.

    Sure the crescendo when  revving the n/a engine high is nice but low down torque counts for more in daily drives plus you can be faster more easily.

    Speaking of how it has been forgotten. Have you seen the prices of air cooled cars?  I hope you are right. It would be nice if forgotten the SAME way. 


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Leawood911:

    Speaking of how it has been forgotten. Have you seen the prices of air cooled cars?  I hope you are right. It would be nice if forgotten the SAME way. 

    Aircooled is expensive since very recently...before that, they were collecting dust on selling websites....Smiley

    this time will be back, there is no rarity with these cars and they are a hassle to maintain...Smiley


    --

    GT Lover, Porsche fan

    991.2 GT3 manual, 991 GT3 2014(sold)

    Cayenne GTS 2014


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    the-missile:
    Leawood911:

    Speaking of how it has been forgotten. Have you seen the prices of air cooled cars?  I hope you are right. It would be nice if forgotten the SAME way. 

    Aircooled is expensive since very recently...before that, they were collecting dust on selling websites....Smiley

    Smiley Same as older GT3 models... Smiley

    this time will be back, there is no rarity with these cars and they are a hassle to maintain...Smiley

    I'm afraid so... I know a couple of guys who bought a 993 or 964 for financial reasons only. Low interest rates, distrust in stock markets and/or investments, many people put their money into real estate, art, jewelry/gold and...cars. Understandable.


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    reginos:

    Normally aspirated will be forgotten like air-cooled has been forgotten.

    Not by customer demand but rather because of imposed legislation restrictions. Why do you think the GT3 /RS, the most sought after 911 variants, are still NA and Porsche is doing everything they can to keep it that way?

    IMO for a daily car with a 911 size of n/a engine the torque of turbocharging is more useful than the high revs of the n/a engine.

    Useful? its a sportscar, not a people mover. I have been using one daily for almost 20 years and would not trade some torque for the engine responsiveness, reving character and sound.

    Sure the crescendo when  revving the n/a engine high is nice but low down torque counts for more in daily drives plus you can be faster more easily.

    Again, for people movers sure, but if you use a sportscar for daily it is not because you want to prioritize confort and easy driving, it is because you want to enjoy sportiness every time you must drive and loathe wasting in a people mover.

     


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    A bit too absolutist of a view. I too prefer NA / high RPM motors (bought one of the last 981 GTS for that reason.) However, after spending time in my brother's 991.2 S, I could easily cross to the other side. One thing I would not compromise on however is the number of cylinders: 6 is the minimum. 

     


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    KMM:

    A bit too absolutist of a view. I too prefer NA / high RPM motors (bought one of the last 981 GTS for that reason.) However, after spending time in my brother's 991.2 S, I could easily cross to the other side. One thing I would not compromise on however is the number of cylinders: 6 is the minimum. 

    I'm speaking of myself though, not meaning to postulate absolutes for everybody, I can understand others having different perspectives, all equally respectable. Just sharing my view which is very clear on the matter, maybe I'm picky, but to me there is a big difference.


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 992 Thread Closed

    Carlos from Spain:
    4trac:
    Carlos from Spain:
     

    Carlos, are you coming to any conclusions re. a replacement path for your 991 in all of this 992 news?  At your famous rate of accumulating km, you will be well over 100k soon if not already, and I never see you in (oh, lets just say) an R8....Smiley

    I'm afraid I'm at a loss right now, the small turbocharged engine would be a significant step back for me, sure it has more power but few instances I would really take full advantage of it if we stop to think about it, it is not a track car, on a commute or mountain road driving I wouldn't be any slower, yet I would loose significantly in terms of enjoyment and experience due to the the throttle directness and engine reving NA character, and the engine soundtrack. That I use 100% of the time. While Porsche did a fantastic job reducing those aspects in the 3.0LTurbo, they are still noticeable, especially for someone coming from the 3.8L NA. Just the sound is a big difference.

    I don't see any groundbreaking changes in the 992 to compensate for that, so for the first time in almost 20 years of driving a 911 daily, I don't have an option available yet for when I change 911. The GT3 is not really a sensible option for a daily with the amount of Km I drive it not use. .

    Outside Porche I see no options that will improve my experience, an R8 has a great NA engine but it is too flashy, and not a daily driver. Also I want rear seats, I  rarely use them but I guess its a psychological thing that I want them.

    The good thing is that the  991.1 GTS is the best 911 I ever owned, actually the best have ever driven for daily & weekend combo usage. So I really enjoy it and have no urgency of trading it in for another one, but I put a lot of miles on it an won't last for ever.

    Fortunately, it has been rock solid and reliable, it has almost 90,000Km and feels like new, looks new as well save for the stone chips of those miles.So I'm not motivated to change by that aspect either.

    I guess I'll  wind up with a turbocharged 992 GTS at sometime, don't see a hybrid-NA 992 on the horizon coming soon enough, so instead of trying to trade-up as soon as possible, this time I will post-pone it as much as I can.

    Thanks Carlos - that is pretty much what I thought you would say based on your various comments on the .2 variants.   I agree on the weakness of the 3 litre turbo models, there is a spot in the rev range where it just feels like a small displacement engine, and that kills it.  (and I recently noticed that both Harry Metcalfe and Chris Harris voiced similar grumbles in their reviews). GT lineup is also out for the same reasons as you.  What we are doing is re-considering our assumption that the full Turbo should not be considered; a recent test drive impressed with not just the expected low-rpm torque, but Porsche have been quietly improving steering feel, sound, PDK shift speed, and overall engagement compared to past versions.  Don't "need" AWD but it may allow another 4 months of use in our country.  I would say the Turbo is no longer just about endless power... seriously considering doing one before the (larger?  hybrid?) 992 Turbo is out.  


    --

    2017 Range Rover Sport S/C,  2009 Porsche 911S


     
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    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part I) Thread Closed 9/24/20 12:47 AM
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    Porsche Sticky The moment I've been waiting for... 12/30/20 9:03 AM
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    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New Porsche 911 Turbo S (2020) 4/10/21 2:32 PM
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    Porsche Sticky Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos) 5/12/21 3:30 PM
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    Porsche Sticky ROAD TEST: New 992 Carrera 4S 3/3/21 10:57 PM
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    Porsche Sticky Porsche Taycan Turbo S - Short Review 10/19/20 6:12 PM
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    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part II) 5/11/21 3:34 PM
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    Porsche Sticky Porsche extends the Taycan model range (Taycan 2WD) 2/1/21 12:42 PM
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    Porsche OFFICIAL: New 991.2 GT3 (2017) 7/27/20 2:13 AM
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    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 GT2 RS (2017) 4/29/21 7:24 AM
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    Porsche OFFICIAL: 991.2 GT3 RS (2018) 4/28/21 12:26 PM
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    Porsche OFFICIAL: New Panamera (2016) 2/11/21 9:22 AM
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    Others Alfa Romeo 4C 9/23/20 10:22 AM
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    Porsche 992 GT3 5/17/21 5:05 PM
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    Lambo Lamborghini Huracan and variants 4/9/21 4:32 PM
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    Porsche Welcome to the new Taycan Forum! 4/29/21 3:48 PM
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    AMG AMG GT R 11/19/20 11:47 PM
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    Lambo Aventador and SV 4/20/21 3:21 PM
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    Porsche 991 Speedster 9/3/20 4:29 PM
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    Ferrari Ferrari 812 Superfast 5/15/21 1:04 PM
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    BMW M BMW M2 Rumors 3/21/21 5:01 PM
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