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    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    You're cool, man. I still love you.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Holminator said:
    Okay dudes. Found it now that my wife has stopped tasking me. Try this (it's a good one): http://www.ferrariclub.com/faq/heeltoe.html. Enjoy!



    Thanks for the link

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    JP66 said:
    Quote:
    Holminator said:
    Okay dudes. Found it now that my wife has stopped tasking me. Try this (it's a good one): http://www.ferrariclub.com/faq/heeltoe.html. Enjoy!



    I just tried your link and it said it didn't exist



    Hmmm, I just noticed that someone is running a buffer overflow attack from that site now. I'm no Internet expert, but I wonder if that has something to do with the problem you noticed. Here's a cut & paste job:

    ********


    What is a "heel-toe" downshift?
    "Heel-toeing" is the commonly-used term for matching the speed of the engine to that of the transmission when downshifting.

    For example, let's assume that you're in 4th gear at 3,500 RPM and going 60 MPH. Now you want to downshift to 3rd gear. 3rd gear at 60 MPH is probably about 4,500 or 5,000 RPM (these numbers are theoretical). Therefore, in order to make the shift as smooth as possible, you need to "blip" the throttle to 5,000+ RPM right before you engage the clutch in 3rd.

    Done properly, this minimizes the weight transfer from the rear to the front of the vehicle since the shift is less abrupt, minimizes driveline strain, maximizes rear wheel grip since the tires don't get a sudden speed change, and minimizes wear on the clutch since the clutch and flywheel are spinning at closer to the same speed. Of course, the laws of physics still apply - don't try popping the clutch into 2nd at 90 MPH, even if the engine "will" rev to 15,000.

    Heel-toe downshifting is a bit tricky to master, but once you've practiced for a while and got the hang of it, you'll never go back to "ordinary" downshifts. Proper shoes can make all the difference in the world when trying to learn this procedure - purpose-built driving shoes are best. The difficulty of a heel-toe downshift stems from the fact that your right foot is probably busy with the brake pedal at the time of the downshift (you were probably doing 80 MPH in 4th when you started braking and it wasn't until you got down to 60 MPH that you were ready to downshift). Since your left foot is operating the clutch and your right foot is operating the brake - you're out of feet! Therefore, your right foot must do double duty, with part of it used on the brake and part available to "blip" the throttle. This can be envisioned as having your toe on the brake pedal and your heel on the gas, thus the term "heel-toe." However, unless you're inordinately flexible or double-jointed in the ankle, it is more likely that you would use the ball of your foot on the right side of the brake pedal and then use the right arch of your foot on the gas, as you roll your foot downwards and to the right.

    The sequence for a proper heel-toe downshift is as follows:

    Apply the brake with the ball of your right foot.
    Depress the clutch pedal with your left foot.
    Place your hand on the gear lever.
    Rotate your right foot counter-clockwise by pushing your heel away from you, then "blip" the throttle with the right edge of your right foot by rolling your foot down and to the right, while still applying even pressure to the brake pedal.
    At the same as the throttle blip, move the gear selector into the lower gear.
    Release the clutch pedal quickly.
    A few tips to keep in mind as you practice the above procedure:
    The entire sequence should happen quickly and assertively, but don't force the gearbox, as you may cause damage to your transmission.
    If you wait too long to re-engage the clutch following the "blip" and the gear change, the engine RPMs will drop too far below the target RPM for a smooth shift, and the car will lurch forward. To avoid this, make sure you're revving high enough, and releasing the clutch pedal quickly enough.
    Practice the "blip" portion of the procedure without the braking at first. Simply come off the gas to slow the car down a bit, then put in the clutch pedal, blip the throttle as you downshift, then quickly re-engage the clutch. This will help you learn the right amount of "blip" and help you with the timing. This is also a good procedure to use when you're cruising at low RPMs at want to downshift before accelerating.
    Intially, you will probably have trouble keeping even pressure on the brake pedal. Many drivers end up applying too much pressure to the brake pedal as they "blip." Make sure you practice this when you're not being closely followed.
    Make sure you let out the clutch pedal quickly and completely at the end of the sequence. You can "cheat" by letting it out slowly, but this causes more wear on the clutch and can somewhat cover up the fact that you didn't time the RPMs just right on the downshift.
    Don't feel bad if it takes you a while to get the hang of it. After repeated practice, you'll be downshifting like a pro!
    Contributions to this FAQ by: Jeff Littrell, Steve Jenkins

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    nberry said:
    I agree. Those that heel and toe on the street are engaging in a practice that is initially much harder on the transmission and clutch. Unless one is very proficient (Ben is) the times you miss revvs is brutal on the car.

    Also, what is the point of using it in street driving? The technique was developed solely for racing and not as many have stated to run the car smoother. Why would anyone need to exit a street corner faster?

    H&T on the street is a useful as changing your oil every 100 miles. Just does not make sense.

    BTW, is heel and toe recommended in the manual? Is it even discussed by Porsche other than in a track setting (PDE)?



    I don?t agree.

    Well, preicesely because its street driving those that are starting to learn it, can start out doing it in light downshifts were there is no danger and then progress, and as Ben pointed out, its the only way to make it second nature form the practice.

    Its may have been developed for racing, but that doesn't mean that matching the revs before dropping the clutch repeteadly on a shorter gear is not smoother on the engine and transmission. And regardless if you are driving in the street, there are always times you have to downshift don't you? you should always have the more or less appropiate gear for the exit anyway, you never know whats going to happen.

    So I guess you change your oil every 100 miles cause your F1 tranny heel-and-toes automatically for you when you downshift and blips the throotle to rev match... on the street

    As to the manual, does the manual teach you how to drive?

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    Quote:
    nberry said:
    I agree. Those that heel and toe on the street are engaging in a practice that is initially much harder on the transmission and clutch. Unless one is very proficient (Ben is) the times you miss revvs is brutal on the car.

    Also, what is the point of using it in street driving? The technique was developed solely for racing and not as many have stated to run the car smoother. Why would anyone need to exit a street corner faster?

    H&T on the street is a useful as changing your oil every 100 miles. Just does not make sense.

    BTW, is heel and toe recommended in the manual? Is it even discussed by Porsche other than in a track setting (PDE)?



    I don?t agree.

    Well, preicesely because its street driving those that are starting to learn it, can start out doing it in light downshifts were there is no danger and then progress, and as Ben pointed out, its the only way to make it second nature form the practice.

    Its may have been developed for racing, but that doesn't mean that matching the revs before dropping the clutch repeteadly on a shorter gear is not smoother on the engine and transmission. And regardless if you are driving in the street, there are always times you have to downshift don't you? you should always have the more or less appropiate gear for the exit anyway, you never know whats going to happen.

    So I guess you change your oil every 100 miles cause your F1 tranny heel-and-toes automatically for you when you downshift and blips the throotle to rev match... on the street

    As to the manual, does the manual teach you how to drive?



    You've hit the nail on the head actually....the F1 style transmission 'blips' the throttle on down changes as it is programmed to do (thus simulating a H&T change) because.... it is the best way to change said gear. Because it's electronic/software controlled it does it perfectly every time but there's not as much satisfaction as executing your own, perfect, H&T change.

    If you ride bikes (myself and Carlos that I know of at least), it is one of the first things taught and becomes absolute second nature in all riding, quite important when you're changing dowm from 12000 rpm approaching a bend and you'd rather the back wheel didn't lock up and start skipping around.


    On another point, and this has been raised before, I find H&T down changes more difficult in my 997 then it was in the 996 because of the pedal positions, it was so easy and natural in the 996 but requires a little more thought and effort in the 996.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    http://www.touringgas.com/Videos/Supercars3parte.zip


    A Video with Walter Röhrl in an Audi Quattro Rally car. The camera shows also his feet and the pedals while driving.

    Bye
    zani

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Man that video is something else. And those spectators are such complete idiots...
    As for heel and toe - that's more like a ballet that he's doing. Amazing.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Justin said:
    Hard braking at the track or on a mountain road is not the place to be learning for the exactly reason you mention. If something goes wrong, you will not make the corner. It's better to get started in an environment that provides room for error and you can work your way up from there.

    I can understand the folks with F1/sequential interface transmissions laughing at everyone, but it's also a satisfying part of the convential manual shifter. When I master it, then I may go to a gearbox with a sequential interface.

    Nick, Ben, et al,
    Suppose you are driving a standard stick shift Ferrari or other sports car, and not one with the F1 option (bear with me here). How are you approaching turns that require a downshift? Let the clutch out slowly under braking? Downshift post apex? Let the engine pull in a higher gear?

    Just curious as to what the alternatives are for street driving.



    This is what I know. Time your downshift so that you have completed it, with your left foot off the clutch and over into the dead pedal area, BEFORE you ever start to turn the steering wheel into a corner.

    During H&T you are constantly applying brake pressure throught the manuever.Braking occurs BEFORE downshifting. And you cannot watch the tachometer-- your eyes must be looking ahead. Input from your eyes and the forces on your body will tell you if your doing right.

    Carlos, I agree H&T can make driving more fun. However, if you don't blip enough, the driving wheels will lockup when the clutch is re-engaged. That'll cause big problems! If you blip too much, the car will attempt to accelerate... and you are supposed to be slowing down. Thus unless you have mastered it your better over practicing with the engine turn off to get a better feel for the technique.

    Once you feel your proficient, you can start the engine and practice blipping while the car is stationary. Once you mastered the blipping you can head for the road.

    BTW keep in mind I consider myself a driving hack.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Zani said:
    http://www.touringgas.com/Videos/Supercars3parte.zip


    A Video with Walter Röhrl in an Audi Quattro Rally car. The camera shows also his feet and the pedals while driving.

    Bye
    zani



    WOW! I'm not going to lie! Walter Röhrl is way above my level of driving expertise!!! Heh, because of this discussion, I actually started doing a bunch of H&Ts on the way to work. Oh man, talk about rusty! Great video!!! Thanks!

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Ando said:
    On another point, and this has been raised before, I find H&T down changes more difficult in my 997 then it was in the 996 because of the pedal positions, it was so easy and natural in the 996 but requires a little more thought and effort in the 996.



    Aldo, that is exactly what I said when I tried the 997, I thought it may be just me but I'm considering aftermarket pedals for the 997 when it arrives.


    Nick, I agree, if you get it wrong it will do more harm than good coming into a corner, but since you can start on the street gradually with slower downshifts progresively you can get proficient enough to use it in sporty driving. Also you can leave you right foot on the brake pedal and compensate for too much or too little blip in case you miss by far and there is allways room on the street to delay a bit the entry in that case since you are just practicing. I guess since I'm used to sportbikes were its a more complicated maneuver and specially less room for error also, hell-and-toe on cars seems quite "innocent". Coming to the double S curve at the end of the straight of the track at 150mph and having to brake in a few meters while you drop three gears as you modulate the braking with the finguers of the same hand that you are bliping the throttle so as no to lock your rear from the huge rev difference and engine braking of the 1000cc and who's rear is wanting to hoover from the dive of braking and in the quickest possible time before you have to iniciate the turn in with your body dealing with only two small contach patches and no electronic aids nor seat bels and chasis puts car's heel and toe in a different perspective

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    ... if you get it wrong it will do more harm than good coming into a corner, but since you can start on the street gradually with slower downshifts progresively you can get proficient enough to use it in sporty driving.



    Carlos is exactly right.

    I can't figure out what all the hostility for using heel & toe on the street is about. Is no one here capable of starting out at less than 9.5/10? Where is the danger at 3/10?

    Good golly! I would be nowhere in my progressively more intense appreciation of cars if I never practiced new techniques on the street. Nothing weird is going to happen at 3/10 when one begins to commit proper pedal application to muscle memory. It's a bit like ballroom dancing: it has to get automatic before it can be really useful. How is one supposed to become proficient without lots of practice? Where is the most available practice to be found?

    Who's your Nanny?

    After one commits H&T to muscle memory, then one can graduate to the adjustments necessary to for high-g-load pedal sensitivity. The driver's inputs are accentuated or diminished due to the g-loads cause by higher intensity driving, but the basic technique remains the same. Trying to figure it all out at high-g in the beginning just makes it all harder to learn than need be.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    W8MM said:
    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    ... if you get it wrong it will do more harm than good coming into a corner, but since you can start on the street gradually with slower downshifts progresively you can get proficient enough to use it in sporty driving.



    Carlos is exactly right.

    I can't figure out what all the hostility for using heel & toe on the street is about. Is no one here capable of starting out at less than 9.5/10? Where is the danger at 3/10?

    Good golly! I would be nowhere in my progressively more intense appreciation of cars if I never practiced new techniques on the street. Nothing weird is going to happen at 3/10 when one begins to commit proper pedal application to muscle memory. It's a bit like ballroom dancing: it has to get automatic before it can be really useful. How is one supposed to become proficient without lots of practice? Where is the most available practice to be found?

    Who's your Nanny?

    After one commits H&T to muscle memory, then one can graduate to the adjustments necessary to for high-g-load pedal sensitivity. The driver's inputs are accentuated or diminished due to the g-loads cause by higher intensity driving, but the basic technique remains the same. Trying to figure it all out at high-g in the beginning just makes it all harder to learn than need be.



    You are missing the point. Clearly practice makes one better at H&T. However street practice can produce unnecessary wear and tear on the car and possibly place a practicing individual in a dangerous situation. There are a number of instances where missing the revv can creat problems. Since H&T is desgned for performance driving it is best practiced it at a track where it can make a difference.

    BTW did you notice in the Roehrl video he braked with his left foot with his right on the throttle? When I advocated that, I was told I was insane.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Nick, when you start practicing like Mike says, at 3/10 for example, nothing bad is going to happen to you or the tranny since the shifts are done very slowly and softly. You are just getting the motor coordination down, you won't be bliping it to 7k and droping the clutch by mistake, you blip it slowly and let the clutch out slowly, at first you will be slow and ineffective but quickly learn and do it without mistakes and the progress to more agressive downshifts. Its like learning how to use a manual and staring on first gear. You don't rev it up and drop the clucth at first, you first practice softly and slowly progress to quick launches, there is no risk of launching your car into someone's livingroom if you start slowly.

    But left foot braking (the technique used by Rohrl in the video) is a completely diffrent matter, that is much more dangerous and has no place in the street, and best left for the pro's at the track. The difference is that in heel and toe, the clutch is engaged while you access the throttle, but in left foot braking you run the risk of throttle intefering with the braking you are performing.

    Left foot braking has a benefit on the track for some cars and some curves in particular yet is has no advantage on the street since you don't need to quickly alternate brake and gas coming out or a corner to control a Group B Rally car on a slippery surface as he was doing, nor smooth out sudden transitions between the entry-braking to exit-throttle by overlapping brake and throttle input in a 600kg/900HP F1 as Schummi does, nor neutralising understeer of a FWD car by locking the rears with the brakes while accel with the front wheels, but in the street normal drvers may run the risk of mixing throttle and brake, yet if you only use the right foot for gas and brake you can still jump form gas to brake in a fraction of a second if you are not already hoovering the brake in prevention. But heel-toe is a benefit on the track but is also and advantage on the street for a different reason, the downshifts are smoother on the transmision clutch, gentler on the car's balance and smoother on the occupants as well.... oh and fun too!

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    W8MM said:
    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    ... if you get it wrong it will do more harm than good coming into a corner, but since you can start on the street gradually with slower downshifts progresively you can get proficient enough to use it in sporty driving.



    Carlos is exactly right.

    I can't figure out what all the hostility for using heel & toe on the street is about. Is no one here capable of starting out at less than 9.5/10? Where is the danger at 3/10?

    Good golly! I would be nowhere in my progressively more intense appreciation of cars if I never practiced new techniques on the street. Nothing weird is going to happen at 3/10 when one begins to commit proper pedal application to muscle memory. It's a bit like ballroom dancing: it has to get automatic before it can be really useful. How is one supposed to become proficient without lots of practice? Where is the most available practice to be found?

    Who's your Nanny?

    After one commits H&T to muscle memory, then one can graduate to the adjustments necessary to for high-g-load pedal sensitivity. The driver's inputs are accentuated or diminished due to the g-loads cause by higher intensity driving, but the basic technique remains the same. Trying to figure it all out at high-g in the beginning just makes it all harder to learn than need be.



    Very well said Mike. Some of the silliest stuff is posted around here and a lot of it begins from terminally faulty assumptions.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    W8MM said:
    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    ... if you get it wrong it will do more harm than good coming into a corner, but since you can start on the street gradually with slower downshifts progresively you can get proficient enough to use it in sporty driving.



    Carlos is exactly right.

    I can't figure out what all the hostility for using heel & toe on the street is about. Is no one here capable of starting out at less than 9.5/10? Where is the danger at 3/10?

    Good golly! I would be nowhere in my progressively more intense appreciation of cars if I never practiced new techniques on the street. Nothing weird is going to happen at 3/10 when one begins to commit proper pedal application to muscle memory. It's a bit like ballroom dancing: it has to get automatic before it can be really useful. How is one supposed to become proficient without lots of practice? Where is the most available practice to be found?

    Who's your Nanny?

    After one commits H&T to muscle memory, then one can graduate to the adjustments necessary to for high-g-load pedal sensitivity. The driver's inputs are accentuated or diminished due to the g-loads cause by higher intensity driving, but the basic technique remains the same. Trying to figure it all out at high-g in the beginning just makes it all harder to learn than need be.



    What he said...

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Excuse my ignorance once again, but what are those 9.5/10 and 3/10 or something, figures?

    If H&T has been developed for rally, I am wrong to think that I can drive my car properly on public roads without knowing the method?
    If I have understood your comments, this technique is purposeful to:
    - rev matchs,
    - being gentle with the tranny and rear train on fast cornering,
    - and gain some miliseconds in turns.

    For now, the only thing I feel personally concerned with, is to match the revs. Now, my question is, is there a different method to accurately match the revs without knowing the heel & toe thing ?

    Also, do we need to match rev when upshifting and downshifting, or only downshifting?

    I guess H&T had been a part of the learning curve for some of the very good drivers of this board.
    Ultimately, can a 911 being driven efficiently fast without knowing the technique [no race tracks], or is it mandatory to know it at some point of the time ?

    I would find it a bit harsh to learn the practice of H&T with a 911. Why not begin by a twingo or a corsa? Maybe easier, no?

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    zacharie,

    9.5/10 or 3/10 just refers to driving to 95% or 30% of the car's/driver's limits.

    You can drive perfectly well on the street without heel and toeing by all means, using heel-toe just makes downshifts a bit smoother, the sportier you are driving the bigger difference it makes since in that case you are less aggresive on the transmision and you improve traction of the rears and do not upset car's balance on violent downshifts coming into the bend.

    Only way to revmatch while braking is to heel and toe. If you are not braking you can just blip the throttle with your right foot while the clucth is engaged during the downshift, but in that scenario usually rev match is not that necesary.

    You just need to hee-toe when downshifting, since its when you are changing to a shorter gear that will bring engine braking to the traction wheels when you let the clucth out.

    You will be surprise to see how many drivers put out good lap times without heel-toe, its not night and day differerence and also depends on the car and place. Furthermore one thing is to master it for street spirtited driving, another is to master it to work well at the limits the car is taken at the track, you really have to be quick and get it perfctly right otherwise it may slow you down.

    Just read up on it and practice like we all did, its not hard at all, anybody will eventually learn it. The problem with econo cars is that the pedal placement may not be ideal for heel and toe so it may make thigs difficult for a beginner. The 996 is perfect since you start progressively and you don't run the risk of doing anything bad.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    zacharie said:
    If H&T has been developed for rally, ...



    Heel and Toe gear shifting (or, three-footed driving, if you prefer) is normal operating procedure for old-fart drivers (like me) in the time before sychronised transmissions were the norm. If one did not match the engine RPM to the transmission-required RPM, one "ground (grinded?) the gears". It was nearly impossible to engage the next lower gear without matching the shaft speeds to the required task. Otherwise the little "dog teeth" in the transmission would bounce off each other and make horrible, expensive noises. In racing circles, non-synchronised transmissions are called "crash boxes" in honor of the noise made by poor operator technique. Ha ha ha.

    The main objective is to match the speed the engine "gives" to what speed the transmission (or the rest of the driveline) "wants". If the speeds match exactly, there is no requirement for driveline torque and then the dog clutches can engage or disengage without any binding or drag.

    Low pent-up torque requirements also help keep the car in balance during delicate steering maneuvers. If the wheels are rolling at a given speed and the engine (more importantly the flywheel) is turning either too fast or too slow to match, something has to give when one releases the clutch and forces the two speeds to become the same. The tires are going to have to give up some friction reserve to speed up or slow down the flywheel/engine rotary inertia. The phenomenon is known as a "flywheel energy-dump" (+ or -)into the drive train.

    If the car is already using nearly 100% of the available friction in cornering forces, any request for even more friction force must be accomodated by giving up some cornering friction. The result is called "oversteer" in a 911, and is not particularly helpful when entering a corner in a rear-weight-biased vehicle

    So, you see, H&T has its uses even if one is too young to have grown up driving un-synchronised transmission cars. It's properly understood as a technique for being painstakingly economical of the friction available for driving a vehicle.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Carlos from Spain said:
    Quote:
    Ando said:
    On another point, and this has been raised before, I find H&T down changes more difficult in my 997 then it was in the 996 because of the pedal positions, it was so easy and natural in the 996 but requires a little more thought and effort in the 996.



    Aldo, that is exactly what I said when I tried the 997, I thought it may be just me but I'm considering aftermarket pedals for the 997 when it arrives.



    No it's definitely not just you Carlos, in my 996 the H&T downchanges needed virtually no thought, perfectly positioned pedals and I did it all the time whereas in the 997 I don't use the method as much because it is not as natural, you have to concentrate that bit more on foot position, actually works better when you're 'pressing on' a bit! I still love the car though.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    I guess since I'm used to sportbikes were its a more complicated maneuver and specially less room for error also, hell-and-toe on cars seems quite "innocent". Coming to the double S curve at the end of the straight of the track at 150mph and having to brake in a few meters while you drop three gears as you modulate the braking with the finguers of the same hand that you are bliping the throttle so as no to lock your rear from the huge rev difference and engine braking of the 1000cc and who's rear is wanting to hoover from the dive of braking and in the quickest possible time before you have to iniciate the turn in with your body dealing with only two small contach patches and no electronic aids nor seat bels and chasis puts car's heel and toe in a different perspective



    Ahh yeah, it's coming back to me now, can't wait for spring to get the bikes out! You're so lucky Carlos being able to ride all year round...scratch a pedal for me mate!

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Ando said:
    Ahh yeah, it's coming back to me now, can't wait for spring to get the bikes out! You're so lucky Carlos being able to ride all year round...scratch a pedal for me mate!



    Unfortunately I'm grounded too for most of this winter, we are having a really cold winter this year with 8-12 *C most days and even though mostly sunny, I'm running DOT race tires supercorsas on the gixxer and these will not warm up enough on the street in this weather

    So I guess all we could both do is imitate this guy until spring

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Thus unless you have mastered it your better over practicing with the engine turn off to get a better feel for the technique.

    Once you feel your proficient, you can start the engine and practice blipping while the car is stationary. Once you mastered the blipping you can head for the road.



    I have found the hardest part about learning H&T is maintianing consistant brake pressure while blipping the throttle. The action of blipping causes one to press harder on the brake making the car jerk around.

    I teach my students (those that want to learn H&T) the following approach. While slowing down approaching a stop sign or traffic light, depress the clutch early and practice blipping the throttle while braking. You can usually get 3 or 4 blips in before you stop. Once you are comfortable with this and are maintaining smooth brake application, you can then integrate a downshift. Once proficient with H&T, then you have to start thinking about double-declutching.

    I H&T-DDC all the time on both the street and track. It'a a necessary skill required for smooth driving, and is something, IMHO, driving enthusiast should strive to learn.

    BTW, in the video, Walter R. was doing a lot of left foot braking...slowing the car and transferring weight while keeping the turbo boost up with his right foot. A ballet, indeed.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Excuse my ignorance but what is double-declutching?

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Quote:
    Matt C said:
    Excuse my ignorance but what is double-declutching?



    Double declutching (also known as "double-clutching" in the US) is an ancient technique that dates from before the days of synchromesh gear boxes. It can make downshifting smoother and can reduce transmission wear. It involves depressing the clutch and dropping into neutral, releasing the clutch, using throttle to match revs for the gear to be selected, depressing the clutch again and selecting the new gear. It ensures that the output shaft is running a the right revs before a gear is selected, creating smoother shifts and reducing wear on synchromesh systems. Some types of unsynchronized manual transmissions require double-declutching. These transmissions may be found in some older vehicles and race cars.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Thanks Tony.

    Just as I thought, it's my lack of English knowledge. We call this "empty declutching" in (Swiss) German.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    Wow, I didn't know that term, Matt. Thanks.


    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    got myself this steel plate from Manthey for my 996tt. a bit expensive but fits perfectly and increases the height of the throttle pedal by approx 50mm, which makes it much easier to 'blip'..

    http://www.manthey-motors.de/mainframe.asp?lang=de&e1=202

    cheers turbolite

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    The funny part is: I never learned it a different way. When I first read about heel and toe on an english spoken forum, I asked myself: what the heck is heel and toe? After somebody explained it to me, I said to myself: hey ,this is what I was doing for the past 18 years of driving.
    And I started to understand why my shoes were always looking like that.

    Re: Do you heel and toe?

    W8MM, thanks for your technical explanation of the H&T real function.
    Well, I think I'll have to learn it, like many others of this forum.

     
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