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    Re: Tesla

    Topspeed:

     

    Over 60% SoC

    I was only able to do one hot lap because the brakes were dangerously overheated at the end of this lap. The car is severely underbraked.

    As for the car itself I really can't stress enough that this car doesn't belong anywhere near a track or near 10 tenths driving.

    The power steering couldn't keep up. Any fast steering corrections were fully unassisted which made driving at the limit very difficult.

    The Plaid doesn't have suspension stiff or sophisticated enough to deal with its mass.

     

    These are all traits of muscle cars of the 60s. 

    Have been saying all along, Teslas are the spiritual successor to the 60s muscles cars, go fast in a straight line and turn well enough to come back down the drag strip. 

    Throttle House tested the car on the wrong track, if they had head to the drag strip, the Plaid would have been fastest among the 28 cars tested.


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    Re: Tesla

    incoming in 3... 2... 1....


    Re: Tesla

    An opinion article on TesIa in the FT Alphaville...  C7BEAB03-A272-4B0C-AF73-D01AEAA5AA36.gif

    "Going back in time and telling a Tesla bull the company is worth $1 trillion"

    When u think about it, it makes perfect sense.

    (1 November 2021)

    This is a guest post from the FT’s San Francisco correspondent Patrick McGee...

    PM: Well, Tesla has done it: it’s worth $1 trillion! More valuable than the next nine carmakers COMBINED!

    19Bull: OMG I knew it - 1m robotaxis on the road just as my man promised!

    PM: Errr... No. None actually, but “Full self driving” is ...

    19Bull: A full-blown reality — obviously!

    PM: Well, 2,000 people are testing it but Elon says left turns don’t work. Might work tomorrow though! Couple bugs to fix.

    19Bull: Still, can’t believe they solved autonomy. Imagine the faces of the people who doubted Elon!

    PM: Oh they didn’t. It’s just called “full self driving.” It doesn’t actually drive without you. You gotta keep hands on wheel, eyes on road. But it only costs $10,000, so analysts are bullish of wide adoption.

    19Bull: Oh... So shares rallied on sales of the Cybertruck!? What’s the production version look like? Pretty sweet I bet!

    PM: Nah that’s been pushed back. Hopefully next year. Also it’s not *totally* bulletproof anyway, it turns out.

    19Bull: Crazy that it got to $1tn on just the Roadster 2.0!

    PM: Yeah ... that’s delayed too. Can’t wait until 2023 tho.

    19Bull: … Wait, wait, I get it. Was going to be confused, but — phew. Figured it out: Tesla has been dominating the trucking industry since this year’s launch of the Semi!? Amirite?

    PM: Hmm. Sort of forgot about that tbh. Hardly even comes up. Fingers crossed on 2022.

    19Bull: Wow. I guess their PR dept must be in overdrive.

    PM: Actually no, they got rid of their PR department last year so comms are basically just Elon’s tweets these days. He tweets about Dogecoin a lot. It’s gone up in value by like 14,000%.

    19Bull: Sorry I misheard you. For a second I thought you said 14 thousand per cent.

    PM: Yeah. Elon’s the Dogefather.

    19Bull: What?? Jfc. OK but you’re telling me the stock, currently worth $50bn, has rallied 20x in two years just on S3XY production? That’s nuts! Just how much did they exceed Elon’s goal of 1m cars in 2020 by?

    PM: Err, they didn’t. Got pretty close though. A nudge under 500k. Pretty, prettaaaay, good.

    19Bull: So there’s no autonomy, production has underwhelmed, and they’ve delayed the Roadster, Semi and Cybertruck? ... … Gotta admit, I’m kind of at a loss here. I guess the economy has straight up been kicking ass from 2019 onwards?

    PM: What, no. Everything’s awful. A pandemic swept the world and 5m people died. We hardly leave our houses anymore. 

    19Bull: (stunned into silence).

    PM: Yeah...

    19Bull: How was this pandemic good for Tesla?

    PM: It wasn’t. Fremont was shut for weeks. The chips shortage is global now.

    19Bull: But Tesla’s outlook is good?

    PM: I mean... ish. They’re worried about chips of course. And all the congestion at ports...

    19Bull: THEN WHY IS IT WORTH $1TN!?

    PM: Oh that’s easy. Glad you asked. You know Hertz? The rental car group? Well it went bankrupt—but it’s back baby! Ordered 100,000 Model 3s. Pretty sweet huh? That’s $4.2bn right there. Stock went up like $200bn. Boom!

    Link:  https://www.ft.com/content/fd20a93b-2cc8-4bcb-ab99-9343ba36027f

    ...wonder what's the next chapter in this great fiction? Smiley


    Re: Tesla

    Carlos from Spain:

    incoming in 3... 2... 1....

    Lol


    Re: Tesla

    Leawood911:
    Carlos from Spain:

    incoming in 3... 2... 1....

    Lol

    Smiley  1531251576305amiguitos.gif


    Re: Tesla

    A speech by SEC Chair Gary Gensler...  C7BEAB03-A272-4B0C-AF73-D01AEAA5AA36.gif

    “Prepared Remarks At the Securities Enforcement Forum”

    by SEC Chair Gary Gensler

    (4 November 2021)

    Thank you for having me here today. As is customary, I’d like to note that my views are my own, and I’m not speaking on behalf of the Commission or SEC staff.

    In 1934, in his first speech as the SEC’s first Chair, Joseph Kennedy told the National Press Club, “The Commission will make war without quarter on any who sell securities by fraud or misrepresentation.”

    Though much has changed since then — technology, financial products, and business models are always evolving — Kennedy’s words still ring true today.

    Enforcement is one of the fundamental pillars in achieving the SEC’s mission.

    One pillar is the policy framework — the laws set by Congress, and the rules enacted by the Commission.

    But you’ve also got to examine against those laws and rules, and enforce those rules. That oversight and enforcement are the other two critical pillars.

    Think about a football game without referees. Teams, without fear of penalties, start to break the rules. The game isn’t fair, and maybe after a few minutes, it isn’t fun to watch.

    Without examination against and enforcement of our rules and laws, we can’t instill the trust necessary for our markets to thrive. Stamping out fraud, manipulation, and abuse lowers risk in the system. It protects investors and reduces the cost of capital. The whole economy benefits from that.

    At the SEC, we follow the facts and the law, wherever they may lead, on behalf of investors and working families. That means holding individuals and companies accountable, without fear or favor, across the approximately $100 trillion capital markets we oversee.

    It is critical that our enforcement program have tremendous breadth, be nimble, and penalize bad actors so we discourage misconduct before it happens.

    That means bringing cases that matter to our three-part mission — whether deceptive conduct in the private funds space, offering frauds, accounting frauds, insider trading, market manipulation, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act cases, reporting violations, or fiduciary violations.

    Today, I’d like to discuss some principles I have asked our Enforcement Division to consider as they investigate misconduct and make recommendations to the Commission.

    Economic Realities

    The first principle is economic realities.

    Arbitrage has been a longtime feature of finance. Maybe we buy something in Paris and sell it for a profit in London. All too often, though, some folks try to arbitrage the rules and laws — between jurisdictions, within borders, across legal entities, or among technologies.

    Activities should be subject to consistent regulation, though, regardless of the entity, the technology, or the business model.

    If a driver is pulled over for speeding, it doesn’t really matter if she’s driving an electric vehicle or a gas-powered one.

    There’s an old saying: “When I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, I call that bird a duck.”

    Sometimes, people focus on labels. For example, we hear terms like “decentralized finance” (DeFi), “currency,” or “peer-to-peer lending.” It can seem easy to take these words at face value.

    Make no mistake: regardless of the label or purported mission, we will be looking at the economic realities of a given product or arrangement to determine whether it complies with the securities laws.

    History tells us that when a group of people try to mask the underlying economic realities of a certain product or instrument, investors can get hurt. Further, their pain can spread from the financial system to the real economy.

    So if you’re asking a lawyer, accountant, or adviser if something is over the line, maybe it’s time to step back from the line. Remember that going right up to the edge of a rule or searching for some ambiguity in the text or a footnote may not be consistent with the law or its purpose.

    Again, think about the spirit of the law. It’s about protecting investors.

    Accountability

    The next principle is accountability.

    Accountability — whether individual or institutional — is an important part of the SEC’s enforcement agenda.

    We’ll use all of the tools in our toolkit to investigate wrongdoing and hold bad actors accountable — including administrative bars, penalties, injunctions, or undertakings, where appropriate. We’ll be prepared to litigate or seek a robust finding of facts if we settle. The public benefits, and justice benefits, from the robust finding of facts.

    It instills confidence in our financial markets when bad actors are held accountable. Moving efficiently and bringing bad actors to justice promotes confidence in our system.

    Remedies, such as penalties and admissions, need to be carefully calibrated to have a specific and general deterrent effect. We need to leverage prophylactic remedies — like bars and injunctions — that protect investors from future harm.

    When it comes to accountability, few acts rival admissions of misconduct by wrongdoers. When appropriate, and when the conduct warrants it, we may seek admissions in certain cases where heightened accountability and acceptance of responsibility are in the public interest.

    High-Impact Cases

    Next, I’ll turn to high-impact cases.

    Unfortunately, I’ve learned in my first six months here that there are all too many fraudsters, penny stock scammers, Ponzi scheme architects, and pump-and-dump cons taking advantage of investors. We have to protect the public from as many of these scams as possible.

    We will continue to pursue misconduct wherever we find it. That will include the hard cases, the novel cases, and, yes, the high-impact cases — whether in special purpose acquisition companies; cyber; crypto; or private funds; whether accounting fraud, insider trading, or recordkeeping violations. I know, recordkeeping violations might come as a surprise. While these may not grab the headlines, the underlying obligations are essential to market integrity, particularly given technological developments.

    A cop on the beat has to balance both the high-impact cases and the everyday fraudsters. A high-impact case pulls many other actors back from the line.

    This prompts legal alerts, client letters, and bulletins to go out. Compliance departments, lawyers, and accountants change internal procedures as well.

    Such high-impact cases are important. They change behavior. They send a message to the rest of the market, to participants of various sizes, that certain misconduct will not be permitted.

    Some market participants may call this “regulation by enforcement.”

    I just call it “enforcement.”  

    Process

    Next, I wanted to share some thoughts on process.

    There are a few process matters I’ve emphasized to our Divisions of Enforcement and Examinations, which make up half of the remarkable SEC staff.

    Timeliness

    First, I think we should focus on bringing matters to resolution swiftly.

    As the old legal saying goes, justice delayed is justice denied.

    The defense bar often makes a strategic decision to burn clock. Memories fade; following evidentiary trails can get more difficult. I understand the bar’s incentives, but we at the SEC have a different mission to fulfill.

    Thus, I’ve asked staff to cut back on meetings with entities that want to discuss arguments in their Wells submissions.

    I believe it’s important for the people closest to these cases to be making decisions and eliminating unnecessary process. So if you request a meeting, please make it targeted.  Don’t expect multiple, repetitive meetings on the same issues.

    We’ve got precious resources, we need to move the docket, and we will be bringing cases expeditiously.

    With respect to our Examinations Division, we expect registrants to produce materials and respond to requests promptly. An examination is not an enforcement action. Thus, firms should not use lengthy privilege reviews to delay responding to routine document requests. This would speed up the examination process for everybody.

    Furthermore, responding to issues raised in an examination and curing any deficiencies is a good way to avoid possible enforcement action.

    Other Law Enforcement Agencies

    Next, I think we benefit from working in parallel with our fellow federal agencies, law enforcement authorities at the state level, international regulators, and self-regulatory organizations.

    For example, last week, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco announced changes to several Department of Justice (DOJ) policies regarding corporate criminal enforcement. 

    Among the changes, DOJ has instructed prosecutors to consider a corporation’s entire history of misconduct in making determinations about criminal charges and resolutions.

    The agency also strengthened prior guidance that, to qualify for cooperation credit, corporations must provide the Department with all relevant facts relating to individuals responsible for the misconduct.

    In addition, DOJ is considering whether resolutions such as non-prosecution and deferred-prosecution agreements are appropriate for certain recidivist companies.

    While our organizations are independent, and our enforcement tools, authorities, and missions are distinct, these changes are broadly consistent with my view of how to handle corporate offenders.

    Sourcing of Cases

    Those other law enforcement agencies and self-regulatory organizations are a valuable source of cases for us.

    Of course, our Enforcement staff themselves are a great source of cases. They’re the ones closest to the market. They might read a news story, find something curious, and open up a case. They’re the real cops on the beat. I can’t thank them enough for their dedication to the public. 

    There are also internal referrals from across our whole agency to the Enforcement Division. When it comes to enforcement referrals, I’ve asked Acting Director Dan Kahl of the Examinations Division and Director Gurbir Grewal of the Enforcement Division to evaluate existing practices and see how we can make improvements.

    Moreover, we benefit greatly from the tips, complaints, and referrals of our robust whistleblower program. The program this year exceeded $1 billion in payouts since the passage of the Dodd-Frank Act in 2010.

    Another source of cases is self-reporting. Look, if you mess up, and people do mess up sometimes, please, come talk to us. All things being equal, if you work cooperatively to bring wrongdoing to light, you fare better than if you try to mask it.

    Cooperation — at least the type that gets credit — means more than meeting your legal requirements, such as responding to lawful subpoenas or making witnesses available for lawfully-compelled testimony. It means doing more than the bare minimum, like conducting a self-serving, independent investigation. It means taking steps that enhance our investigation, allow us to move quickly, and, if appropriate, help us to identify additional misconduct.

    Positions of Trust

    Before I close, I’d like to address the audience directly — those of you who are lawyers, auditors, accountants, bankers, and investment advisers. You all play an important role in our capital markets. Market participants rely on you for advice and counsel on a daily basis.

    Within our securities laws, you are entrusted with certain responsibilities and take on certain obligations as well.

    Thus, you occupy positions of trust. Though you represent your clients, you also have an important role in upholding the law, which protects investors and our markets.

    You can often be the first lines of defense. That’s particularly true when a client is getting close to crossing the line. I ask you to think about the economic realities, to think of the duck test, and not to help paper over the cracks.

    In opening my remarks, I quoted Joseph Kennedy. But three months earlier, William O. Douglas, the future SEC Chair (and later a Supreme Court Justice), spoke to a roomful of lawyers, just like this one. (Well, maybe they were in person.)

    Times were different. We were in the depths of the Great Depression. The ’34 Act establishing the SEC had not yet been signed into law.

    Douglas told the audience, “Service to the client has been the slogan of our profession. And it has been observed so religiously that service to the public interest has been sadly neglected.”

    As with Kennedy, I find myself thinking that what Douglas said still rings so true.

    You all have our own clients, to be sure. Working in a field such as finance that touches so many lives, though, you also have another responsibility: a responsibility to the public.

    The public is the SEC’s client. They’re the ones I think of every morning when I go to work. I hope you do, too.

    Thank you.

    Link: https://www.sec.gov/news/speech/gensler-securities-enforcement-forum-20211104

    ...what is this “High-Impact Case” that they are working on? Smiley


    Re: Tesla

    Spell it out for us please. I fell asleep twice reading through all of it. Reminds of my mom taking a shot at me every now and then - ‘Is there something you need to tell me about?’  

     


    Re: Tesla

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/07/elon-musk-faces-a-15-billion-tax-bill-which-is-likely-the-real-reason-hes-selling-stock.html

    Looks like TSLA is facing some selling pressure on the next couple quarters.

    Elon has a 15 billion tax bill coming up. Is it fair that he has a 54.1% tax bill? 

    He already had 92 million shares pledged to banks as collaterals for his living expense loans. More or less $100 billion right there. 

    Once he start selling the bank will call his margins, meaning he will need to sell even more shares. Not to mention Tesla the company also have loans against company shares outstanding and needed to cover their margin calls?

     

    Is Biden really out to destroy TSLA? This last part will be more or less political in nature, perhaps the replies would be better off in the political section. 


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    Re: Tesla

    Political - ya think?  Lol

    one word Unions.  Do we need a politics thread for Elon?  If people are as butt hurt about Elon as Trump then the brainwashing has been way too successful.  Is anyone here seriously against Elon and for government screwing non union world class businesses with our own tax dollars?  Same goes for this tax scheme?  Is anyone here on board with that crap?   Btw I hope everyone has caught on to the fact that Russian collusion was orchestrated by Hillary and the Dems with lots of help from our friends at FBI and CIA.  In essence the impeachment was a full on coup.  


    Re: Tesla

    But the Democrats isn't just out to get Elon only. They are targeting every new 'tech' CEO. 

    All of them do the same thing as Elon did, borrowing against their company share holdings as living expenses. 

    Elon is just the headline figure head as he is the richest on paper. 

    The older generation tech CEO and such all had cashed out and their company stock holdings is a much smaller percentage of their paper wealth. They don't need to sell shares to cover tax bills, mostly. 

     

     


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    Re: Tesla

    It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that Elon is a genius. What he has done with commercial satellite launch vehicles is truly fantastic (what happened to nasa???). I think he is just brilliant and think about the wealth he has created for America, incredible


    Re: Tesla

    996FourEss:

    It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that Elon is a genius. What he has done with commercial satellite launch vehicles is truly fantastic (what happened to nasa???). I think he is just brilliant and think about the wealth he has created for America, incredible

    Of course he is a genius, no doubt. He is also a visionary.

    As far as I know, NASA supports SpaceX and Blue Origin, I also think that many former NASA employees are working for Space X and Blue Origin. The cooperation is obvious and wanted. 

    NASA became what every company under government control would become: A lame duck (or better said elephant).

    The USA should be proud of Tesla/SpaceX, Amazon, Apple, Google and others, not punish them. 


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Lamborghini Huracan Performante (2019), Mercedes GLC63 S AMG (2020), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk (2019 EU)


    Re: Tesla

    Those of us who are proud to be Americans are very proud of Elon and all he does. 
    It makes me very sad that the left not only does everything it can to destroy him but also thinks nothing of supporting the rights of a rioters who have killed dozens in the last years over the right of a 17 year old kid fighting for his life against such a mob.  Not even in war time do combatants attack kids trying put out out fires and give medical aid. That little kid knows more about what it takes to be a caring and self reliant human being than most of us here.  So of course, like Elon, they attack him because the leaders and media back this insanity.  Even our President call this kid a terrorist and white supremacy supporter while the trial had not ended.  The prosecutor tried to violate his constitutional right via 5th amendment for which the judge correctly lost his cool - so the media makes the judge out to be biased.  Can you tell I am very disappointed.  This is not orange man bad shit this is just evil nonsense.  Do we want rioters and mania or do we want responsible young adults who can build this nation in the future?  Am I along here or is somehow another controversial politics topic?  If it is then we are really screwed. 


    Re: Tesla

    And it`s getting politically. So please come back to the original topic. 


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    AM


    Re: Tesla

    ALDO:

    And it`s getting politically. So please come back to the original topic. 

    My bad. I appreciate and admire your restraint.   Please disregard my post. I can’t delete it. 


    Re: Tesla

    RC:
    996FourEss:

    It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that Elon is a genius. What he has done with commercial satellite launch vehicles is truly fantastic (what happened to nasa???). I think he is just brilliant and think about the wealth he has created for America, incredible

    Of course he is a genius, no doubt. He is also a visionary.

    As far as I know, NASA supports SpaceX and Blue Origin, I also think that many former NASA employees are working for Space X and Blue Origin. The cooperation is obvious and wanted. 

    NASA became what every company under government control would become: A lame duck (or better said elephant).

    The USA should be proud of Tesla/SpaceX, Amazon, Apple, Google and others, not punish them. 

    Stated on RT many times before that Musk isn't the genius he is often portrayed.  Instead he has taken the ideas of many and have added his ample financial resources behind it.  He didn't create Tesla and SpaceX is an offshoot of the Planetary Society.  The individuals associated with these two entities did the intellectual heavy lift, Musk just capitalized on their achievements.  SpaceX's current successes, as an example, accumulated because of the leadership of Gwynn Shotwell.  Many of the concepts SpaceX allegedly pioneered were research conducted over 60 years ago at NASA and its predecessor, NACA.  See supersonic retropopulsion and its long history within NASA.   


    Re: Tesla

    And PayPal, StarLink and Tesla solar, and Neura Link and the Boring company. Soon the Tesla Phone. All of it as vertically integrated as you can imagine it could possibly be. Yeah, he is just an ordinary guy. Can you name one person dead or alive who has done as much?  300 billion $ dumb luck.  
    This thread is great because this stuff has been stated on Rennteam many times before.  We are all certain e have read it - and it certainly is entertaining.  


    Re: Tesla

    CGX car nut:
    RC:
    996FourEss:

    It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that Elon is a genius. What he has done with commercial satellite launch vehicles is truly fantastic (what happened to nasa???). I think he is just brilliant and think about the wealth he has created for America, incredible

    Of course he is a genius, no doubt. He is also a visionary.

    As far as I know, NASA supports SpaceX and Blue Origin, I also think that many former NASA employees are working for Space X and Blue Origin. The cooperation is obvious and wanted. 

    NASA became what every company under government control would become: A lame duck (or better said elephant).

    The USA should be proud of Tesla/SpaceX, Amazon, Apple, Google and others, not punish them. 

    Stated on RT many times before that Musk isn't the genius he is often portrayed.  Instead he has taken the ideas of many and have added his ample financial resources behind it.  He didn't create Tesla and SpaceX is an offshoot of the Planetary Society.  The individuals associated with these two entities did the intellectual heavy lift, Musk just capitalized on their achievements.  SpaceX's current successes, as an example, accumulated because of the leadership of Gwynn Shotwell.  Many of the concepts SpaceX allegedly pioneered were research conducted over 60 years ago at NASA and its predecessor, NACA.  See supersonic retropopulsion and its long history within NASA.   

    MAybe. But he has been able to harness the brilliance of others, probably through his own brilliance, like very few others. And that is genius coupled with leadership 


    Re: Tesla

    Leawood911:

    And PayPal, StarLink and Tesla solar, and Neura Link and the Boring company. Soon the Tesla Phone. All of it as vertically integrated as you can imagine it could possibly be. Yeah, he is just an ordinary guy. Can you name one person dead or alive who has done as much?  300 billion $ dumb luck.  
    This thread is great because this stuff has been stated on Rennteam many times before.  We are all certain e have read it - and it certainly is entertaining.  

    You’re have a real talent for idol worship and revising history.  PayPal was formed after the merger of Confinity and X.com, which was Musk’s floundering company.  Once again others threw a lifeline to him.   Sit down when Peter Thiel and really ask him what he thinks about Musk.  StarLink is a rehash of Teledesic, a Bill Gates and Boeing project, started in 2002.  They were too far ahead of the market then. Solar is a joke and you know it. 


    Re: Tesla

    I don’t know anything about him, but I do know he is hard working and successful. This causes people to go off the deep end, sadly. I suggest a bit of objective reality when that happens. Life can’t be that bad. 
    idol worship - that’s hilarious. I worship $300,000,000,000.00 all day long. 


    Re: Tesla

    CGX car nut:
    RC:
    996FourEss:

    It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that Elon is a genius. What he has done with commercial satellite launch vehicles is truly fantastic (what happened to nasa???). I think he is just brilliant and think about the wealth he has created for America, incredible

    Of course he is a genius, no doubt. He is also a visionary.

    As far as I know, NASA supports SpaceX and Blue Origin, I also think that many former NASA employees are working for Space X and Blue Origin. The cooperation is obvious and wanted. 

    NASA became what every company under government control would become: A lame duck (or better said elephant).

    The USA should be proud of Tesla/SpaceX, Amazon, Apple, Google and others, not punish them. 

    Stated on RT many times before that Musk isn't the genius he is often portrayed.  Instead he has taken the ideas of many and have added his ample financial resources behind it.  He didn't create Tesla and SpaceX is an offshoot of the Planetary Society.  The individuals associated with these two entities did the intellectual heavy lift, Musk just capitalized on their achievements.  SpaceX's current successes, as an example, accumulated because of the leadership of Gwynn Shotwell.  Many of the concepts SpaceX allegedly pioneered were research conducted over 60 years ago at NASA and its predecessor, NACA.  See supersonic retropopulsion and its long history within NASA.   

    I still think Musk is a genius. He doesn't have to be a technical genius, it doesn't matter. 


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Lamborghini Huracan Performante (2019), Mercedes GLC63 S AMG (2020), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk (2019 EU)


    Re: Tesla

    Weird that how much different between Space X and Tesla. 

    One is listed the other isn't. the unlisted one is quietly working in the background delivering deadlines after deadlines with major success. The listed one however have yet to keep a deadline and keep using sensational 'news' to prop up stock price quarter after quarter. The whole thing is still based on hopes and dreams. 

     


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    Re: Tesla

    Whoopsy:

    Weird that how much different between Space X and Tesla. 

    One is listed the other isn't. the unlisted one is quietly working in the background delivering deadlines after deadlines with major success. The listed one however have yet to keep a deadline and keep using sensational 'news' to prop up stock price quarter after quarter. The whole thing is still based on hopes and dreams. 

     

    Hopes and dreams - like a visionary ?  Look, I don’t think he is a genius but … it is beyond silly to think he is lucky or not hard working or somehow taking advantage of others by lying or other means.  Weird actually. 
    btw which is not a major success?  The car company which is worth more than all the others ?  What exactly is your measure of success?  Happy customers?  He has those in spades. 


    Re: Tesla

    Have yet to make a cent making and selling cars, all the 'profits' booked ever was from government carbon credits, yet the stock is worth over a trillion. If that's not hopes and dreams I don't know what is. The stock literally have an infinite multiplier so when will profit catch up to the lofty stock price?

    There is only two outcomes, one is either the profit catching up to valuation or the valuation coming back down to match the profit. 

    An Elon was just taking a swipe on Rivian about their valuation earlier.......

     


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    Re: Tesla

    Whoopsy:

    Have yet to make a cent making and selling cars, all the 'profits' booked ever was from government carbon credits, yet the stock is worth over a trillion. If that's not hopes and dreams I don't know what is. The stock literally have an infinite multiplier so when will profit catch up to the lofty stock price?

    There is only two outcomes, one is either the profit catching up to valuation or the valuation coming back down to match the profit. 

    An Elon was just taking a swipe on Rivian about their valuation earlier.......

     


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    Currently it is looking pretty good hence the money is talking.  Who knows what the future holds but as of now nothing else seems to have as much money behind it.  All the other car makers no so much. Name one who would not rather change problems with Tesla???  You worry about the future for Tesla - I am looking at the present and the present predictions based on market cap.  All he has to do is deliver and based on demand and customer satisfaction he is there.  The other automakers have nothing in the pipeline to compete with and less demand and customer satisfaction. 
    I have owned lots of cars and none are competitive at this time. 
    Of course our amazing socialist friends and government could still screw it all up. 
    And maybe you should actually look the Tesla profit picture. Regulatory credits are far from the only profits these days. That is just plain untrue. 


    Re: Tesla

    How is it not true? Do you even read their reports? Or you just go by the press numbers?

    Last quarter was the first ever quarter TSLA had that after backing out government credits they are still in the black. For their fiscal year they are still in the red a whole bunch. 

    However, it is still a good thing, their sale of carbon credits are getting less and less as other manufacturers are making their own EVs and negating the need to buy more credits. Which also means after over a decade they have finally figured out how to reduce cost properly, not from discarding quality or material usage but proper management of their resources and production process. Good timing too now that Rivian is up and running, they are a. valid alternate seller for carbon credits as Tesla lost that monopoly. 


    --

     

     


    Re: Tesla

    E2F3BF96-51C6-42E1-877E-989B770DDE92.jpeg3rd qtr.  12 billion in automotive revenue. 279 million in regulatory credits. Automotive gross profit 3,6 billion - a 74% YoY increase.  Automotive gross profit margin of 30.5%. 
    This from their investor report 

    Is it all lies?  Do you wish to correct any of your story? 
     


    Re: Tesla

    You didn't read my last post? 🤷🏻‍♂️

    What story needed to correct?


    --

     

     



    Re: Tesla

    Impossible.  When similar comments were posted here about people over driving the car, even on the street, and having braking issues, we were told it was impossible.  Impossible. 


     
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