Crown

Board: Porsche - 911 - 997 - Turbo Language: English Region: Worldwide Share/Save/Bookmark Close

Forum - Thread


    Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    My car's stock suspension is being changed to Bilstein's PSS10 and the ride height will be dropped 1 inch. In a few months, I plan to add after-market rear toe & upper control arm links, etc.
    I've done my search and read up on the topic, but still have questions please. Thanks in advance.

    1. Is corner balance considered a must after a change in coillover and ride height?

    2. Since I am going to do some more mods to the suspension (toe & upper control arm links) in a few months, should I hold off on the corner weight balance until then? In other words, does adding toe links, dog bones, etc. require that corner balance be repeated?

    3. I hear some vendor mention the Beissbarth aligner as being the best? Does it make that much of a difference over competitors?

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    1. Yes, corner balancing is recommended whenever a suspension change is made. Be sure to have them optimize it to your weight.

    2. It only costs $100 to do a corner balance so I'd do it with every change.

    3. No experience with various others but my shop used a "Hunter" system which works well.

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Thanks Jason. I didn't know it costs so little.

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Any time you change the ride ht you need to align it.

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    +1 on corner re-weighting after major suspension component changes.

    When I had my 240sx back in college, I swapped everything out for KYB's and Eibach adjustables. Did a autocross with no corner weighting, than came back in had it reweighted for me and the handling was much much nicer!

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Thanks everyone for your input. For those interested some reading material:

    http://www.dietersmotorsports.com/tech/2001/cornerbalance.htm
    (You have to go to the web site for the actual figures & illustrations.)

    Racer Lingo Explained Part: 3

    "Corner Balance"



    By Steve Grosekemper



    Over the last 2 months we have discussed the language used by Porsche techies. It is a little known language referred to as porshese. It is usually heard at driving events and tech sessions. However, it has recently infiltrated the ranks of everything from concours to tours and rallies. I hope as a result of this series of articles you are able to jump into the conversation and impress the crowd with your new found knowledge of the language.

    The term we will discuss this month is "Corner Balance." This is a term which describes the distribution of weight in a car. In its simplest form, corner balance is best illustrated by a 100 pound box being carried by 4 equally sized men. Each man caring 25% (or 25 pounds) of the total load. This would be an equally distributed, or balanced load. If one of the 4 men, lets call him Lew, steps on a stack of bricks his corner (the LR corner or C) of the box will rise. The opposite corner of the box (the RF corner or B) will lower due to the increased load imposed by Lew. The two guys at the remaining corners (A and D) are now taking a free ride and the poor guy at the right front corner (B) is stuck carrying 50% of the load instead of his previous 25%. (See example in figure #1)



    Figure #1



    Now fortunately, none of our cars are being held up by a clumsy guy named Lew. They are however, held up by springs of one sort or another. In virtually all Porsches these springs are externally adjustable in height on at least one end of the car. When the height is lowered on a particular corner the weight is transferred to the wheels opposite of it and its diagonal corner.

    As time goes on, there are many factors that can affect the height and corresponding corner balance of your Porsche. Springs can sag or fail, or there can be a misadjustment of new components. Whenever new springs and/or torsion bars are installed, the corner balance should always be checked.

    The benefit of having the corner balance of your car correct is not always all about high speed cornering performance. If your car is setup like the car in example #2 , the left front tire is carrying 200 pounds or 33% more weight than right front tire. This extra weight will cause extra tire wear as well as an unexplained pull in the steering. Unexplained because the camber and caster may be even and you will still have a pull.


    Figure #2

    Another indication of incorrect corner balance is a car that corners differently from side to side. The car may be set up like the car in figure #2. In this case the car may feel very good in a right turn as the extra stiff spring (LF or A) holds the car flat against the cornering forces. In a left turn however, the weak spring (RF or B) will let the cornering forces push that corner down creating excessive body roll.

    To check and then set the corner balance, the car is put on a set of scales that are mounted to a perfectly flat surface. The anti-sway bars are then disconnected to avoid interference. After checking the readings, the individual corner heights are adjusted to give equal diagonal weights while maintaining a level ride height. In the real world, corner weights are not as even as we might think. Porsche states that diagonal weights of their production cars should be within 44 pounds of each other. If you can get the car within 20 pounds or less, you are in an ideal range. A real world corner balance sheet from a finely set up 911 with driver weight included might look something like figure #3 below .


    Figure #3

    As a rule if your car has not had a corner balance, the chances are about 50% that it is not within the 44lb.- 20 kilogram rule. Some cars that I have checked have been as much as 150 lbs. off on the diagonal weights. Even if only a 30-40 pound adjustment has to be made, an immediate improvement in the cars handling will be felt.

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Thanks, this is exactly the definition I was looking for.

    Does anyone know what the German term for this is?

    thanks,

    --Joe

     


    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    In addition to after suspension changes, corner balancing is a must if you track, or autocross your car. Make sure it's done with "your weight" in the drivers seat.

    The benefit is that the car handles consistently, whether turning "right" or "left". It made a noticable difference after I first had it done for autocrossing a number of years ago.


    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Joe F.:

    Thanks, this is exactly the definition I was looking for.

    Does anyone know what the German term for this is?

    thanks,

    --Joe

     

    Corner balance = Radlast-Waage. Radlast = wheel load, Waage = balance/ weighting machine Smiley
     


    --
    public roads: Porsche 987 S Seal/Cocoa, toll road Smiley : Porsche 997 GT3 Arctic/Black

    Re: Corner Balance Needed after Coilover Change?

    Vielen Dank Porsche-Jeck!

    Could you also recommend a good shop in the Heidelberg/ Mannheim area?

    thanks,

    --Joe

     


     
    Edit

    Forum

    Board Subject Last post Rating Views Replies
    Porsche Sticky The moment I've been waiting for... 1/2/22 1:35 AM
    Leawood911
     
     
     
     
     
    517336 1294
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New Porsche 911 Turbo S (2020) 11/8/21 7:43 PM
    Leawood911
    187110 1154
    Porsche Sticky Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos) 1/9/22 7:08 PM
    Wonderbar
    75600 401
    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part II) 1/19/22 1:24 PM
    Porker
    73867 758
    Porsche Sticky Porsche Taycan Turbo S - Short Review 1/3/22 7:55 AM
    Rossi
    56302 531
    Porsche Sticky ROAD TEST: New 992 Carrera 4S 3/3/21 10:57 PM
    Wonderbar
    50562 336
    Porsche Sticky Porsche extends the Taycan model range (Taycan 2WD) 2/1/21 12:42 PM
    Leawood911
    14046 29
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: Cayman GT4 RS (2021) 1/15/22 10:41 PM
    watt
    1156 1
    Porsche Cayman GT4 10/5/21 7:04 PM
    Topspeed
    477797 3587
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 GT2 RS (2017) 9/28/21 3:25 AM
    WhoopsyM
    393241 3507
    McLaren McLaren on a winning streak 11/25/21 12:31 AM
    WhoopsyM
    388776 3949
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 991.2 GT3 RS (2018) 11/17/21 5:18 PM
    Rossi
    354234 3256
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 R (2016) 10/8/21 11:41 AM
    xpto
    325367 2647
    Porsche 992 GT3 1/18/22 7:30 AM
    GnilM
    295408 3314
    Porsche OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car 9/29/21 1:59 AM
    watt
    257464 1587
    Porsche OFFICIAL: New Panamera (2016) 2/11/21 9:22 AM
    Itsme
    170236 1379
    Lambo Lamborghini Huracan and variants 4/9/21 4:32 PM
    Topspeed
    121569 1225
    Porsche Donor vehicle for Singer Vehicle Design 9/22/21 1:28 AM
    Leawood911
    105910 749
    Porsche Welcome to the new Taycan Forum! 12/22/21 7:10 PM
    Topspeed
    97876 1246
    McLaren F1 7/10/21 7:43 AM
    BiTurbo
    83923 209
    AMG AMG GT R 1/12/22 6:30 PM
    CGX car nut
    76731 828
    Lambo Aventador and SV 1/14/22 2:22 AM
    BiTurbo
    76478 699
    Others Tesla 2 the new thread 1/19/22 3:20 PM
    CGX car nut
    57473 1434
    Others Bugatti Chiron 1/13/22 11:07 PM
    kudryavchik
    45439 507
    Motor Sp. [2021] Formula 1 1/8/22 5:39 PM
    kudryavchik
    43833 1574
    Ferrari Ferrari 812 Superfast 12/15/21 8:04 PM
    Topspeed
    42601 533
    Porsche GT4RS 1/16/22 7:12 AM
    the-missile
    41701 731
    BMW M BMW M2 Rumors 7/7/21 8:38 PM
    Jim_in_Iowa
    31806 394
    Ferrari 488 Replacement 4/17/21 8:28 PM
    Rossi
    28472 370
    Lambo Urus (SUV) 7/21/21 6:22 PM
    Topspeed
    27640 592
    246 items found, displaying 1 to 30.