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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    All automated system now in service works around and adapt to human interactions, they don't force humans to adapt to them. 

    There is a distinction. 


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    A train, subway or a plane adapt to human interaction? yes For example a train going through an crossroad when a car is in the middle?

    Laws will be tweaked to protect the companies the way they did it for other industries once the system is statistically significantly better than humans driving...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    SciFrog:

    A train, subway or a plane adapt to human interaction? yes For example a train going through an crossroad when a car is in the middle?

    Laws will be tweaked to protect the companies the way they did it for other industries once the system is statistically significantly better than humans driving...

     

    You know, you are really stretching and screwing with basic logic.

    Your Tesla's automated rear doors don't chop your head off when it senses a human head is around. Or it does't force it's way out when it senses there is obstructions. 

    Automated transport robots in car factories stop when they sense humans or obstructions in their path, they do't ram the object.

    Elevator doors also re-opens when it sense there is obstructions when closing. 

    Tesla's autopilot still have the tendency to ram stuff on the other hand. 

     


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    I have little doubt the laws will make it work...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Oh yeah, since this weekend is the end of the Jaguar I-Pace season in NYC, it's worth mentioning that the iPace race car uses the exact same drive system as the road car.

    It means the system was designed from the grounds up to be able to survive in a constant high drain high charge environment with no performance degradation. No Tesla would last 2 laps without going Ito limp mode racing like that.

    Porsche's Taycan is also designed with high drain high charge environment in mind, I believe the Audi e-tron shared the system via VAG, so that makes them the latest generation of EV, ahead of Tesla's antique system already. Sucks the even Jaguar is ahead of Tesla. I also believe Mercedes's incoming EV can also do the same thing.

    This is a hardware thing, there is no way for Tesla to do 'over-the-air' 'updates' to fix. They need a complete system redesign to compete from now on.

    They really should go racing to learn more about their own system limitations. Software coding can only do so much.

    Heck, imagine Tesla entering Formula E.

     

     


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Tesla reminds me of the low cost 1970s stereo manufacturers from Japan that tended to emphasis a few statistics as overall performance was often substandard.  Only those that shopped a handful of specs were impressed.  The Tesla Cultists still don’t get it when they actively criticize the newer entrants for alleged poorer specifications than their beloved appliance maker.  Audi, Mercedes, and even Jaguar, have infinitely greater resources than Tesla and there is a reason why Audi has a large battery buffer.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Whoopsy:

    Oh yeah, since this weekend is the end of the Jaguar I-Pace season in NYC, it's worth mentioning that the iPace race car uses the exact same drive system as the road car.

    It means the system was designed from the grounds up to be able to survive in a constant high drain high charge environment with no performance degradation. No Tesla would last 2 laps without going Ito limp mode racing like that.

    Porsche's Taycan is also designed with high drain high charge environment in mind, I believe the Audi e-tron shared the system via VAG, so that makes them the latest generation of EV, ahead of Tesla's antique system already. Sucks the even Jaguar is ahead of Tesla. I also believe Mercedes's incoming EV can also do the same thing.

    This is a hardware thing, there is no way for Tesla to do 'over-the-air' 'updates' to fix. They need a complete system redesign to compete from now on.

    They really should go racing to learn more about their own system limitations. Software coding can only do so much.

    Heck, imagine Tesla entering Formula E.

     

     

    These are road cars, so who cares? The Taycan can do 4 0-120 in a row. Yawn. I have yet to do one ever, let alone 4 in a row. So far, German EV are inefficient and apparently also over engineered... their choice...

    Nick, all this talk about performance and endurance yet you are looking one of the slowest with the lowest range EV out there, the Etron. I think Tesla knew pretty much where they needed to be to satisfy an original American audience, and that’s what they delivered. Tesla are one lap wonders at best, so be it. I don’t think many people outside of extreme sport car enthusiasts care. This opens room for others to take another direction though, like the Taycan being a 4 door 911 with great endurance and performance, at the expense of range and price, but after all, it is a Porsche. Let’s see what they will deliver for a EV SUV, but so far on paper, the Etron is pretty much last in all specs.

    Since it looks like that you have done some homework, do you know what happens to the battery capacity in a high drain discharge scenario? angry


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    CGX car nut:

    Tesla reminds me of the low cost 1970s stereo manufacturers from Japan that tended to emphasis a few statistics as overall performance was often substandard.  Only those that shopped a handful of specs were impressed.  The Tesla Cultists still don’t get it when they actively criticize the newer entrants for alleged poorer specifications than their beloved appliance maker.  Audi, Mercedes, and even Jaguar, have infinitely greater resources than Tesla and there is a reason why Audi has a large battery buffer.  

    They also have much more to loose. If their EVs are too good, it will kill sales of their other models, if they can even produce and deliver enough batteries. LR/Jaguar have large resources? You might want to tell that to their shareholders angry

    Yes Teslas are inferior in their built quality. But they are also much cheaper. The Model Y will be half the price of an Etron...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Will leave this here for discussion, without any additional comment.

    http://www.autoextremist.com 

    By Peter M. DeLorenzo

    Detroit. Back in the fall of ’76, when my misguided experiment at getting into the retail side of the auto business in East Lansing went up in smoke, I realized then that my calling wasn’t dealing with upside-down “ups” and the churn and burn of a high volume auto store that operated on the premise of getting people into new cars, whether they could afford them or not (they usually couldn’t).

    Not only did I not like it, I detested every minute of it. But the parting words to me by the General Manager before he let me go were classic, as he said that “I just marched to a different drummer.” (Truer words were never spoken, by the way. -WG). 

    From there my life adventure took me on a wild ride through advertising and ultimately this website, and though I have learned and experienced a lot over the years, I’m still savoring the ride. And why not? There’s still plenty to do and see and experience, and there’s no point sitting on the sidelines waiting for things to happen.

    But as someone who was fortunate enough to witness Detroit’s Golden Age up close and from a front-row seat, it’s no secret that the looming transition to alternative propulsion is cause for a great deal of consternation. Make no mistake, electrified propulsion is cool and all that, but there is something decidedly missing from the equation. Yes, the instantaneous torque is indeed impressive, if the bragging rights of having blistering acceleration is all you’re after, but beyond that, what? There is simply no visceral appeal and no sound and fury. I loved slot cars as a kid, but that was a long time ago.

    The reality for most people is that in the coming transition to fully electric vehicles – unless confined to the urban slog – will only thrive as second vehicles. Yes, if you rumble around the city and that is all you demand from your vehicle you will certainly be able to do just fine with a fully electric vehicle as your only mode of transport. But if you venture out on longer trips, the notion of planning a trip around charging stations is not something that most people are going to want to put up with. Where’s my sense of adventure, you might ask? My sense of adventure is just fine, thank you, but stopping for extended periods of time on a road trip to recharge is not my idea of a good time. 

    And during the winter months, the effort to live with a fully-electric vehicle in frigid temperatures - with a reduced range by half - is simply unacceptable. Oh, you haven’t heard about range reduction in the freezing cold? You probably haven’t if you’ve only listened to electric car zealots bragging about the advantages of their vehicles. But make no mistake, in the cold weather parts of this country electric vehicle drivers are in for a rude awakening. Want to use that heater? The range goes down. How about those heated seats and that heated steering wheel, if you ordered those options? The range goes down.

    That’s why I have to shake my head when I hear all of the rosy predictions about the coming Age of Electrification. I see global auto manufacturers dumping hundreds of billions of dollars on electrification, whether forced to by government regulations or in the blue-sky belief that it’s What’s Next, but the realities of this looming transition don’t exactly jibe with these massively aggressive plans. According to a report from the Manhattan Institute by Mark P. Mills, entitled “The New Energy Economy: An Exercise in Magical Thinking” those realities are sobering. In fact, they’re downright ugly. Here are just a few:

    ·      Hydrocarbons supply over 80% of world energy: If all that were in the form of oil, the barrels would line up from Washington, D.C., to Los Angeles, and that entire line would grow by the height of the Washington Monument every week.

    ·      A 100x growth in the number of electric vehicles to 400 million on the roads by 2040 would displace 5% of global oil demand.

    ·      Renewable energy would have to expand 90-fold to replace global hydrocarbons in two decades. It took a half-century for global petroleum production to expand “only” 10-fold.

    ·      Replacing U.S. hydrocarbon-based electric generation over the next 30 years would require a construction program building out the grid at a rate 14-fold greater than any time in history.

    ·      Efficiency increases energy demand: since 1995, energy used per byte is down about 10,000-fold, but global data traffic rose about a million-fold; global electricity used for computing soared.

    ·      Since 1995, total world energy use rose by 50%, an amount equal to adding two entire United States’ worth of demand.

    ·      For security and reliability, an average of two months of national demand for hydrocarbons are in storage at any time. Today, barely two hours of national electricity demand can be stored in all utility-scale batteries plus all batteries in one million electric cars in America.

    ·      Batteries produced annually by the Tesla Gigafactory (the world’s biggest battery factory) can store three minutes worth of annual U.S. electric demand. And, to make enough batteries to store two-day’s worth of U.S. electricity demand would require 1,000 years of production by the Gigafactory.

    ·      Every $1 billion spent on data centers leads to $7 billion in electricity consumed over two decades. Global spending on data centers is more than $100 billion a year—and rising.

    ·      Over a 30-year period, $1 million worth of utility-scale solar or wind produces 40 million and 55 million kWh respectively. $1 million worth of shale well produces enough natural gas to generate 300 million kWh over 30 years.

    ·      It costs less than $0.50 to store a barrel of oil, or its equivalent in natural gas, but it costs $200 to store the equivalent energy of a barrel of oil in batteries.

    ·      Over 90% of America’s electricity, and 99% of the power used in transportation, comes from sources that can easily supply energy to the economy any time the market demands it.

    ·      Politicians and pundits like to invoke “moonshot” language. But transforming the energy economy is not like putting a few people on the moon a few times. It is like putting all of humanity on the moon—permanently.

    ·      The common cliché: an energy tech disruption will echo the digital tech disruption. But information-producing machines and energy-producing machines involve profoundly different physics; the cliché is sillier than comparing apples to bowling balls.

    ·      If solar power scaled like computer-tech, a single postage-stamp-size solar array would power the Empire State Building. That only happens in comic books.

    ·      If batteries scaled like digital tech, a battery the size of a book, costing three cents, could power a jetliner to Asia. That only happens in comic books.

    ·      If combustion engines scaled like computers, a car engine would shrink to the size of an ant and produce a thousand-fold more horsepower; actual ant-sized engines produce 100,000 times less power.

    ·      About 60 pounds of batteries are needed to store the energy equivalent of one pound of hydrocarbons. At least 100 pounds of materials are mined, moved and processed for every pound of battery fabricated.

    ·      Storing the energy equivalent of one barrel of oil, which weighs 300 pounds, requires 20,000 pounds of Tesla batteries ($200,000 worth).

    ·      Carrying the energy equivalent of the aviation fuel used by an aircraft flying to Asia would require $60 million worth of Tesla-type batteries weighing five times more than that aircraft.

    ·      It takes the energy-equivalent of 100 barrels of oil to fabricate a quantity of batteries that can store the energy equivalent of a single barrel of oil.

    ·      A battery-centric grid and car world means mining gigatons more of the earth to access lithium, copper, nickel, graphite, rare earths, cobalt, etc.—and using millions of tons of oil and coal both in mining and to fabricate metals and concrete. And in case you’re wondering, China dominates global battery production with its grid 70% coal-fueled. EVs using Chinese batteries will create more carbon-dioxide than saved by replacing oil-burning engines.

    Sobering realities indeed. 

    I am all for a visionary future (hell, I love thinking about flying cars as much as the next person). And I love the chances being taken and the ongoing explorations that are pushing the envelope of our transportation future. It’s part of the American fabric to dream big and imagine what could be, and I am all for it. And I am quite certain that discoveries and great leaps forward will be made to make batteries much more efficient and cheaper too. But I am also quite certain that the predominant form of vehicle power for oh, at least the next 25 years or so, will come from Internal Combustion Engines. (I can sometimes see myself with a fully-electric car as my principal vehicle for around town, but I would have to have an ICE-powered vehicle, too, preferably with rear-wheel-drive and a V8. That’s just…reality.)

    What does this mean for these manufacturers going all-in on electrification (yeah, that means you, VW Group)? Let’s just call it for what it is: The biggest bet in automotive history. It’s also the biggest marketing challenge in automotive history as well, because creating demand on a massive scale for vehicles that people don’t even know that they want will be a monumental task.

    And let’s remember one big thing - this isn’t Hollywood. And just because a company builds them doesn’t mean that people will come and buy them.  

    And that’s the High-Octane Truth for this week.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    No additional comment is needed, I had to laugh out loud while reading those bullet points and thinking back to the "magical thinking" comments in this thread about the future and EV is here 


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    SciFrog:
    Whoopsy:

    Oh yeah, since this weekend is the end of the Jaguar I-Pace season in NYC, it's worth mentioning that the iPace race car uses the exact same drive system as the road car.

    It means the system was designed from the grounds up to be able to survive in a constant high drain high charge environment with no performance degradation. No Tesla would last 2 laps without going Ito limp mode racing like that.

    Porsche's Taycan is also designed with high drain high charge environment in mind, I believe the Audi e-tron shared the system via VAG, so that makes them the latest generation of EV, ahead of Tesla's antique system already. Sucks the even Jaguar is ahead of Tesla. I also believe Mercedes's incoming EV can also do the same thing.

    This is a hardware thing, there is no way for Tesla to do 'over-the-air' 'updates' to fix. They need a complete system redesign to compete from now on.

    They really should go racing to learn more about their own system limitations. Software coding can only do so much.

    Heck, imagine Tesla entering Formula E.

     

     

    These are road cars, so who cares? The Taycan can do 4 0-120 in a row. Yawn. I have yet to do one ever, let alone 4 in a row. So far, German EV are inefficient and apparently also over engineered... their choice...

    Nick, all this talk about performance and endurance yet you are looking one of the slowest with the lowest range EV out there, the Etron. I think Tesla knew pretty much where they needed to be to satisfy an original American audience, and that’s what they delivered. Tesla are one lap wonders at best, so be it. I don’t think many people outside of extreme sport car enthusiasts care. This opens room for others to take another direction though, like the Taycan being a 4 door 911 with great endurance and performance, at the expense of range and price, but after all, it is a Porsche. Let’s see what they will deliver for a EV SUV, but so far on paper, the Etron is pretty much last in all specs.

    Since it looks like that you have done some homework, do you know what happens to the battery capacity in a high drain discharge scenario? angry

     

    So you simply don't get it for automotive design.  

    Having a system designed for those scenarios doesn't mean it needs to be exercised that way, it just means the system is designed to be robust enough to withstand any and most situation and in the rare situation that the capability is needed, it's nice to know the car will be capable of delivering what's required.

    Why are automotive brakes designed to be able to easily beat DoT requirement? Because just good enough won't do it. Tesla's current electric system is of the just good enough sort of design.

    Face it, every other car maker has moved on ahead of Tesla now in EV system, Tesla's system is ancient and outdated by tech standard. Tesla's system is from 7 years ago, eons in tech terms. It was the Core i7 4770K cpu, state of the art and fastest at the time, but the constant Windows updates can only do so much, sooner or later the cpu will need to be replaced. Right now every other EV maker is already on the Core i9 9900K, 7 years NEWER than Tesla.

     

     

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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    The last post is so riddle with misrepresentations and lies it is not even worth an answer. You need to stop drinking the VW Kool Aid, it has tainted your views. I try to be the most objective and describe real first hand ownership experience, good and bad, as other Tesla owners here are. But some of you have an “all good or all bad” biased and extreme point of view. No point arguing with people wearing blindfolds Smiley


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    You bought a Tesla already, so you can't really say bad things about your purchases blush

    My post is not even close to brand specific. Go pick any Honda, Toyota, hell even GM pickup trucks, they all have brake systems that easily beat the DoT standard. If they go by your opinions, those braking systems are a waste to be so powerful.yes

    It would seems you are the one that's wearing blindfolds bud.

     


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    4649B032-FFAD-4124-8962-71A42CC1168E.jpeg
    4185A7D2-FF88-46B4-AA41-950945A7178B.jpeg
    B6BD094E-E5DE-4BEC-B3DE-FCECDB4C4A40.jpeg
    817CD9E8-C281-4A37-9EFB-2F280622498B.jpegI will say anything bad about my purchase, I already have. Panel gaps, one small rattle, autopilot weaknesses. 

    Still the best daily driver I have ever owned, by far. 

    And look at that horrible non luxury interior that I have to live with every day, a nightmare. 

     

     


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Whoopsy:

    You bought a Tesla already, so you can't really say bad things about your purchases blush

    My post is not even close to brand specific. Go pick any Honda, Toyota, hell even GM pickup trucks, they all have brake systems that easily beat the DoT standard. If they go by your opinions, those braking systems are a waste to be so powerful.yes

    It would seems you are the one that's wearing blindfolds bud.

     

    The part about Tesla is just a pile of nonsense, as usual. 


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    What nonsense? Tesla falling behind?

    Well please face the truth, and the truth hurts.

    Tesla is the first comer 7 years ago, they were the first to develop EV for mass market. 

    But the system was never updated for 7 years, it's still pretty much the same system now as in 7 years ago, and same one across their model range.

    The other car makers are late comer, but they also have the benefits of coming in late and study the competition, i.e. Tesla first and see short comings. 

    The competitions are not just going to develop a gen 1 system just to catch up to Tesla now, they developed gen 2 systems anticipating Tesla would do the same and they all can compete on equal gen 2 footing. 

    Alas, that didn't happened. Tesla is stuck in their gen 1 system while everyone else comes out with gen 2. Right now Tesla have lost the technological advantage, they are no longer the leader, and now a chaser. 

    All because Elon focus his company's time and effort on a semi-useless Autopilot program. 


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Yup, Tesla have made zero progress in 7 years and sells the same cars. I guess you are referring to 800V systems? So far that’s just a wet firecracker since Model 3 does 250kwh TODAY. How could someone claim that a system that is slower, has less range and less efficiency is ahead Smiley

    Model 3 is Gen 2. S and X 1.5. The rest of EVs are Gen 0.5 but with good potential. They will catch up eventually, they will have to.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    https://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-s/2013/

    For memory, EPA range was 208 and 265 (60/85 packs, forget the 40), fastest Model S 4.0 0-60. Yup, same cars  oh and no autopilot.

    Without any more advances, 800V is kind of overkill for a mid level daily driver already today. It will happen eventually though, most likely.

    In the meantime, the ETron does not have enough range for me to go to work in the winter, or to go from my beach house back to the city, or to go to an area we go to shop, run some errands and back.  And I would even know where to charge it along the way as the dealers are 10 minutes off the highway. In this case, indeed, this EV tech is not ready for prime time.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    I’ve always found DeLorenzo to be insightful and honest. Thanks for posting CGX.

    Fuel cells still seem like the best long term solution given the difficulties of producing a huge quantity of batteries and electric infrastructure.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    EV adoption will be slow, especially outside of the US/Canada. For now they cost more and infrastructure will not be ready for a while.

    This article makes several good points, but also has a few big misses. Range anxiety and slow charging times are being addressed and by now it is an issue only if you buy the wrong car (ie with a range too small for your needs, only Tesla has long ranges, so far). He is wrong about the grid in the USA. Nissan is already showing tech to use car batteries to support the grid. Tesla Powerwall does it with utilities in several states. Solar will be slow to grow but with States forcing it (California) and new advances in design and features (Tesla roof and Powerwall), plus possible cheaper panels (printed ones?) eventually it will make sense financially.

    So much money is thrown at EV tech now that progress, if not leaps is almost assured for the next decade. Tesla bought Maxwell tech. Li-Air batteries... who knows. Just look at the numbers: in 6 years Tesla S max range went from 268 miles to 430 miles, with the next one at 500 miles in a few months (when S battery switches to the existing Model 3 battery tech making a 120kwh pack possible). Charging went from 90kwh to 250kwh on the same 400V tech, and 800V is slowly coming (if needed at all). 

    And for the ones saying nothing new will come up, just look at this for example:

    https://www.anker.com/products/variant/powerport-atom-pd-1-%5Bgan-technology%5D/A2017121

    New USB chargers 40% smaller with GaN tech. Who even knew this was in the pipeline or possible? It seems that there is still a lot to discover. Maxwell tech? Just read up. Many universities have battery prototypes that can charge way faster too. Next Tesla pack will be good for 1 million miles. The car will not last that long, but that means the pack can be re-used for other applications like home or grid storage.

    I hope people here realize that fuel cell car are also EVs... the battery is replaced by a chemical reaction using hydrogen but the engine is still electric. Maybe we will see some fuel cell/battery hybrids but ICE is dead at some point for cars, even in hybrid forms. But seriously, with cars that have 500 miles ready this year or next, who needs hybrids anymore? If someone buy a car with less than 200 miles range today and complains it is not enough, it is on them, not that the tech is not ready...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    On a lighter note:

    Tesla to make Tomorrowland electric in new partnership with Disney, sources say

    https://apple.news/Az0LTjqidSdq8wWTs5BJQ9g


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    GaN chargers are an interesting product but are you sure people will use them? People usually buy those cheap 5 bucks USB chargers and wonder why their batteries catch fire. 

    I said it before, technology evolves all the time and new and better charging methods and better batteries will be available in the future gut they need to be certified for usage in cars (which can take a while) and at some point, some sort of standardization is necessary as well to guarantee compatibility.

    The biggest issues are however the charging infrastructure and the energy sources used to charge the cars. Then, there is the battery recycling/waste and cobalt issue, which hasn't really been solved yet.

    Last but not least, people really need to want EVs. People wanted PCs, people wanted smartphones but do they want EVs? Not yet, simply because internal combustion cars are still too good and they are even getting better.

    So in the end, the success of EVs worldwide will be determined by cost and government subsidies. 

    Governments plan to make the usage of internal combustion engine cars more and more expensive. At some point, this may actually help EVs but the question is: Will these governments survive their approach? People may not be too pleased with being "forced" to get an EV.


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Lamborghini Huracan Performante (2019), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Cigarette taxes? Alcohol taxes? Gas taxes? Eco/carbon taxes? Large solar/powerwall/geothermal and so one rebates?

    They already exist, pretty much every country has them and they are not going away unfortunately...

    It might takes several decades depending on the countries but ICE cars are dead, if anything because of geopolitical reasons.

    Here is another funny story, my daughter asked me not to pick her up in the X, same way she did with the Ferraris, because it is too “fancy” angry As a teenager girl, she likes to blend in and not attract attention, and the X is too cool and too show off for her... problem is I do not have cars to blend in... my boy on the other hand, that’s a whole other mind set...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    It has been proven time and time again that trying to predict the future over a decade from now is magical thinking... Things that far away never turn out how we think, we think we know but never do.


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Speak for yourself... Maybe I have better access than most to a lot of “interesting” points of views but many things, especially in tech, have turned out spot on. A decade is indeed long, but cars tech does move slower than some other tech.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    SciFrog:

    I have no idea what the Tesla cult people think... But he is talking about a specific item of contention. And for the record my panels gaps are not great... I wrote it before. Not that I care since I am not getting that fixed any time soon.

    Dinosaurs applies to the industry as a whole, some are finally slowly moving though smiley

    Bob Lutz goes after Tesla with lies again

    https://apple.news/AS05SzYmBQpeiD_FAG2u5pA

    Never a dull day.

    Market check: Tesla market cap $43bio, GM $55bio, Ford $41bio. That’ a lot of people wrong right there Smiley

    Let’s put back in context his comments after Tesla earnings, on a quarter where they delivered to costumers the most cars ever...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    One more silly example of how there are so many things we need to discover:

    The French military is proud to unveil its very own hoverboard-riding, rifle-touting supervillain

    https://apple.news/ASZX_Ro9ETe6vTd1LEQVoMA

    That is super cool. Can you put this in the context where the Tesla Roadster will have cold thrusters from Space X tech (vaporware, for now)? Which leads to the next questions, what have the other automobile manufacturers done except hold back innovation to extract maximum profit? That’s the part where Musk shines and why people tolerate all the other fallacies, they are innovating even if sometimes they are wrong, they just admit it and move on.

    The lack of vision here is sometimes quite puzzling. Maybe it has to do with the European economy behind a disaster, but I for one am very excited for is to come the next few decades. Flying cars? Of course they are coming. The problem will be regulation though. But they figured out the drones...


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    WSJ: Electric Airplanes Start to Take Off

    https://apple.news/AFlpo_w6-Syu6wEubsctmXA

    Some small airlines, however, are already retrofitting their fleets. In Vancouver, Harbour Air Seaplanes took one of its aircraft out of storage to install a 750-horsepower electric motor developed by magniX, which moved its headquarters to the Seattle area from Australia about a year ago. The first test flight is planned for November.

    “In the next five years, you’re going to see a lot more retrofits than you do new aircraft,” said Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX, which is backed by Singapore-based conglomerate Clermont Group. “There are a lot of operators that need to fly short routes that could benefit from a retrofit.”

    Greg McDougall, Harbour Air’s chief executive and founder, said electric motors have fewer moving parts and produce less heat than the turbine engines his airline currently uses, making them cheaper to maintain. Batteries in the near future should also provide sufficient range for the airline, given that the average flight is just under half an hour.

    “I’m a businessman, I’m not just a dreamer,” said Mr. McDougall, whose airline flies to coastal locations around Vancouver. “If I can see economic viability in what we’re doing, then why wouldn’t I do that?”


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    SciFrog:

    Speak for yourself... Maybe I have better access than most to a lot of “interesting” points of views but many things, especially in tech, have turned out spot on. A decade is indeed long, but cars tech does move slower than some other tech.

    Suuuuure...  Hindsight bias? Check. Projection bias? Check. Wishful thinking bias? Check. Reality is, projections past a decade or two are useless, you just don't realize how much because of bias, seriously.


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Trump’s election, no one saw that one coming angry


     
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    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part II) 9/22/21 3:45 PM
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