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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    I will be brutally honest I would be soooo embarrassed driving such a thing, I'd feel like a fool, makes one look like an easily manipulated fool with no criteria who would fall for anything they tell them... it is like that awkward guy in a party wearing the ridiculous over the top tasteless clothes thinking he is looking so cool and everybody is laughing behind his back indecision

     

    It is just hilarious, just have a read bellow:

     

     

    https://jalopnik.com/a-deep-look-at-the-design-of-tesla-s-cybertruck-1839993654

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    A Deep Look At The Design Of Tesla’s Cybertruck

    I just want to be clear, right off the bat, that I love weird automotive design. I’m also quite fond of simple, possibly even crude designs. I’m not afraid of new, even strange automotive ideas. And yet, somehow, I still can’t even with this new Tesla Cybertruck, a truck that finally answers the question of what would a truck look like if it was designed on a Nintendo 64 and built in a country with zero ability to stamp steel. That’s a question, it should be noted, that no one fucking asked.

    Tesla’s Cybertruck made a hell of an impact when it was first revealed but I’m not entirely sure that impact was a good one, like the twin impacts that shattered the truck’s windows, hilariously.

    The Cybertruck is striking, no question. It doesn’t look like other trucks on the road, which is fantastic. But I don’t think it’s actually good design, aesthetically or practically, as a usable truck.

    It is futuristic-looking, I suppose, but in the way that hastily-built prop vehicles built on air-cooled Volkswagen pans for sci-fi movies look futuristic.

    I’m guessing there’s properties of the 0.12-inch stainless steel this thing is built out of that prevent complex stampings with curves or any sort from being used, and that’s why this thing looks like it’s a low-polygon model from a mid-1990s video game.

     

    The lack of curves anywhere, even the angular wheel arches, feels less like a deliberate design decision and more like a severe constraint that weighed heavily on the designer. It seems like the sort of thing that would be built in a country without the means to stamp complex shapes from steel, like the Citroën FAF or the Volkswagen Hormiga.

    Illustration for article titled A Deep Look At The Design Of Tesla’s Cybertruck

    These simple, crude, but highly usable vehicles managed to have a certain simple charm about them though. A charm that the Cybertruck lacks, and I think that’s because vehicles like the Hormiga were designed with utility and a sense of humility in mind, while the allegedly and needlessly bulletproof Cybertruck is designed around what feels like a very peculiar and specific sort of insecurity and arrogance. But there may be other reasons for the look at play.

    Also, earlier utility vehicles with simple, flat panels that required no complex pressings almost always had something in common to make those flat panels stronger: corrugations.

    Look at a Citroën HY Van, for example. It’s effectively covered in ribs to give thin metal strength. The Cybertruck has no corrugations at all but is made of entirely flat panels. Flat, thin steel panels with no corrugations are weak, unless the metal is thick and, as a result, heavy.

    Elon said the stainless steel body panels on the truck are 3 millimeters thick—that’s 0.12 inches thick. Conventional relatively modern automotive sheet metal is usually no thicker than 20 gauge, which is 0.812 millimeters or 0.032 inches thick. That’s around a third the thickness of the Cybertruck steel.

    The question is why. Why would you use thicker, heavier metal if you didn’t have to? There’s a lot of disadvantages to a really heavy car. The only thing I can think of is that the ease of manufacturing, coupled with stainless steel’s lack of need for paint, was the big motivators here.

    I wonder if Tesla’s past difficulties with manufacturing of more conventionally-designed cars with complex curves like the Model S or Model 3 have made them decide they just wanted something really cheap and easy to build—hence the crude look of thick, flat panels joined together, looking like a spaceship from a PS1 game.

    Cheap and easy to build is not a bad thing at all—but there’s a huge cost here, mostly at the expense of weight and materials used. The end result also isn’t a very cheap, entry-level vehicle, which means that any savings in manufacturing aren’t about making a more affordable truck, it’s for the good of the company.

    That’s understandable, but also worth mentioning.

    It looks like a kit car. It feels brutish and rushed, awkward and cumbersome, and, really, not even all that original, as there have been kit cars that used these same fundamental designs as far back as the 1970s:

     

    That’s an UrbaCar, a car that was featured in a 1975 Mechanix Illustrated magazine. It’s remarkably like a scaled-down Cybertruck in design.

    There’s an even more remarkably similar predecessor, though. Look at this:

     

    That picture on top there is from a 1978 issue of Penthouse, and I didn’t find it in a soggy pile by a mattress in the woods, it was sent to me by legendary automotive kit car designer Curtis Brubaker, who made that design over 40 years ago.

    Brubaker’s 1978 design was actually a can that converted into a truck, in the same way Tesla’s truck can have a sliding cover over the bed, and Brubaker’s design also included the slide-out ramp.

    I think Brubaker’s design handled the roofline and wheelarches with more grace, but, fundamentally, it’s the same design.

    It would be one thing if the design provided a great deal of utility, but that really doesn’t seem to be the case. We’ve seen curve-less, crude-adjacent electric truck designs before, from companies like Bollinger, but they at least provide some sort of practical justification; in Bollinger’s case, there’s a pass-through to allow for carrying really long things:

     

    The Bollinger design uses almost no curves, yet somehow manages to feel more refined than the Cybertruck, and appears to be a lot more practical.

    Sure, the Cybertruck has a small front trunk, which is useful, and some storage, I’m told, in the side buttresses, but overall I think Bollinger’s full front bed offers a lot more flexibility.

    Of course, it costs more, doesn’t perform as well as the Tesla one (allegedly) will, and isn’t bulletproof, but I’m not so sure I really think a bulletproof truck is that important. And, if it is to you, maybe you should consider other things about your life situation before even considering truck ownership.

    The fundamental design of the Cybertruck looks like it would make loading things from the sides quite awkward. I think I see some tie-downs inside the bed in the corners, though they don’t appear all that accessible, being stamped out of the steel sides.

     

    It does appear that there are small auxiliary taillights in the rear bedsides, so you can drive with the tailgate (which has the long taillight strip) down.

    The lack of wheel wells in the bed is nice, like a stepside truck, though I think in the hot summer sun that bed could be both hot and blinding. Maybe they’ll have some kind of bedliner option?

    This may sound a little silly, but there are a lot of sharp corners on that thing, like the sides by the tailgate, and as anyone who has loaded awkward, bulky things into a truck can tell you, the idea of taking one of those pointy bits to the small of your back hardly seems like a remote possibility.

    I like the Honda Ridgeline-like under-bed trunk area, as well as the front trunk, though the steeply-raked A-pillar design seems like it limits the frunk volume and makes interior headroom needlessly cramped. The visibility I’m not confident about either, with that massive driver’s eyes to windshield distance the slit-like rear window, and those massive rear buttresses.

     

    There’s also no rearview mirrors, though I suspect that would have to change before production.

    The tailgate appears to be un-dampened, and the ramp is a nice touch, though it’s hardly the first integrated-ramp pickup truck, and modern pickup trucks do have some pretty novel tailgate designs.

     

    While I’m hardly a fan of modern pickup truck design, I can’t say that I think the Tesla Cybertruck is solving any design problems. It looks crude, rushed, and rudimentary, and I can’t see any way that the design actually improves anything about the actual operation and use of a truck. Really, it seems like it would be an awkward truck to actually live with and use.

    Impressive specs, sure, but I’d trade real utility in a truck any day over being able to beat a Porsche 911 at a stoplight.

     

    I’ll try and hold truly final judgment until I see one in person, but this initial look at the Cybertruck gives me the impression that this is a truck designed, like so many others, to project an image of mindless, needless intimidation, as exemplified by the demonstrations of it taking bullets and being whacked with hammers.

     

    Screenshot: Total Recall, TriStar 1990

    Just because the Cybertruck looks a bit like some of the cars in Total Recall doesn’t mean it actually is futuristic. This is a vehicle designed clearly for our unsettled, confused, and somewhat desperate present, but I’m not going to quit believing that we still deserve better, more usable trucks. Electric ones, especially.


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS

     


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    So if I want a cybertruck in black, I can't.

    One don't paint stainless steel. 

    And I have yet to find one advantage this has over my Honda pickup. let alone the millions of full sized work trucks.


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    Re: Tesla Roadster

    IMG-20191123-WA0004.jpg


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Expectation vs Reality indecision


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS

     


    Re: Tesla Roadster

     


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    It is clear that the Tesla CyberTruck has been built to a very tight budget.

    No curves, no panel pressing, no paint shop, kit-car assembly, no HSE, minimal pedestrian safety, etc.

    For example, the stainless steel will be directly sourced from existing SpaceX recycled inventory...

    ...which has recently been seen falling out of the sky!

    Smiley


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    That's the prelude to the Tesla armor glass demonstration.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Carlos from Spain:

    The concept isn't a Tesla design.  It is a design a Tesla fan generated months ago when a Tesla truck was announced.  In all fairness, Musk has consistently stated that the truck would resemble something from Bladerunner.  Of course, Bladerunner, the original movie, started on November 21, 2019, so that is why this debuted on Thursday evening.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    The article below is from renowned auto writer Peter DeLorenzo.  I have included the entire article because the first section on General Motor's lawsuit against FCA is fundamentally interesting for any auto enthusiast with an understanding of labor relations.  

    The second section is DeLorenzo's analysis of the Tesla Cybertruck.  Of course, I am very much in agreement with his thoughts and comments.  DeLorenzo, unlike a poster or two on RT, has a deep understanding of the auto industry and effective marketing of its products.

    The Autoextremist - Rants

    By Peter M. DeLorenzo

    Detroit. The swirling maelstrom otherwise known as the AutoVerse was in full-throated roar this week, with a kaleidoscope of stories that captured everyone’s attention. 

    First up? The GM lawsuit against FCA, which accused the Italian-owned automaker of bribing UAW officials to gain advantages in their contracts over the years of Sergio Marchionne’s reign, which negatively affected GM’s competitive position, big-time. GM was accusing FCA of underhanded dealings from the moment Marchionne took control of the company. Was this a surprise? No. After all, from the moment Marchionne was gifted FCA by the U.S. government it was clear that he was willing to manipulate the system in any way possible, or that he could get away with. As I wrote in my column “An Unfortunate Denouement” (7/23/18):

    “Make no mistake, Marchionne & Co. did not endear themselves to anyone in the trenches with the real nitty-gritty dealings of this business. Again, if it weren’t for the True Believers out in Auburn Hills, none of this latest Chrysler ‘miracle’ wouldn’t have gotten off the ground, something that some of the homers in the automotive media don’t even bother mentioning.

    I was also interested to read the glowing comments from certain dealers over the weekend, who insisted that without Sergio they’d be out of business. That may be true, but what about the dealers who bought into Sergio’s promises of world domination, but first they had to spend money on new brick and mortar for Fiat stores? And if they did that, they would be first in line to get a glittering array of Alfa Romeo products, the brand that would be ‘the next Audi.’ I noticed that none of those dealers were asked for quotes, because there were countless numbers of them that lost their shirts because of Sergio’s calculated carnival barking. 

    And what about the constant shenanigans that FCA pulled with their sales reporting? Marchionne was so hell-bent on showing an uninterrupted monthly sales increase that the company misreported sales figures for six years, all the way back to 2011. It was another reminder of Marchionne’s almost unlimited hubris, that if he said it enough and pounded the table enough, the automotive media would believe it and dutifully spread the word accordingly. And he was right, until FCA got caught, and then Marchionne was strangely silent. 

    I have just barely touched upon all of Marchionne’s misdeeds at the helm of Chrysler. He was an absolute tyrant behind the scenes and easily in the Hall of Fame for Horrible Bosses. His egomaniacal insistence that only he knew what was best and only he knew what needed to be done lead to a withering 30+ direct reports, taking micromanaging to unheard of heights.

    Oh well, enough. I only wish the serial offenders in the automotive media would have deigned to expose ‘the other Sergio’ because there are at least two of him. And the less appealing one is petty, belligerent, egomaniacal and forever ungrateful.”

    But of all the sins Marchionne perpetrated on this business, his calculated manipulation of the UAW was most egregious. Interestingly, the name Alphonse Iacobelli was mentioned in GM’s lawsuit dozens of times in its 95 pages. As vice president of employee relations for FCA, Iacobelli was directly involved in carrying out Marchionne’s plan to keep UAW officials beholden to FCA, before he left the company and went to work for GM as executive director of labor relations for eighteen months. Iacobelli was terminated from GM after he was charged with multiple crimes during his FCA tenure, and he is now serving a 66-month sentence in federal prison in Morgantown, West Virginia.

    After a few cryptic emails from him that were sent to our website, I met Iacobelli (at his request) twice in August 2018 at a Starbucks in Rochester, Michigan. I approached the meeting with no preconceived expectations; I knew what he was charged and convicted of – he was awaiting sentencing – but I was willing to listen to what he had to say. And having never met him before, he struck me as someone who had been humbled and humiliated. He didn’t offer any excuses for his conduct, instead he offered details of the circumstances, having brought a three-inch thick stack of documents that included emails and meeting notes, with a remarkable level of detail. 

    Why was I asked to meet him? He said that my series of columns about FCA and Marchionne “were so devastatingly accurate that the company virtually stopped to digest them whenever they came out.” And given my writings, he felt that "you are the only person who I can trust to tell the inside story of what really went on, preferably in a book." My columns were so pointedly accurate that, “they were convinced that you had insiders at the very top levels of the company secreting info to you.” (I didn’t.) And that, “Marchionne and his crew had a complete meltdown over your columns on a regular basis.” (I knew this to be true, as I had been told this multiple time over Marchionne’s reign.)

    Over those two meetings, Iacobelli presented a devastating account of just how deep the payoffs to UAW officials actually were. The FCA-UAW training centers were a complete joke, with UAW members reporting to the centers to do nothing, if they bothered to show up at all. And the tales of payments for plane trips, vacations, binges in Las Vegas and myriad other gifts, cash and prizes were eye-opening, including a $2 million retirement party for an outgoing UAW executive that was staged in Las Vegas. Iacobelli said approximately $250,000 a month was spent keeping the UAW officials in line, in some months less, but in some months much more than that. And it was all designed to extract favorable considerations from the UAW, which translated into reduced labor costs to FCA.

    And Iacobelli named names. In fact, every single UAW official revealed by the Feds so far as having been either indicted or under scrutiny was mentioned by Iacobelli. He said, “they were all on the take and were all going down,” and he was dead right. And make no mistake, Marchionne was up to his eyeballs in every bit of it, according to Iacobelli. In fact, given what he said – including Marchionne gifting expensive watches to key UAW officials with a carefully-worded note attached so they couldn’t be construed to having any value - I surmised that Marchionne would have been indicted if he hadn’t passed away, and Iacobelli didn’t disagree with my assessment. (I never spoke to Iacobelli again, but I still think it would make for a fascinating book that would probably destroy what passes for the UAW these days.)

    So, GM is taking the extremely aggressive move of suing FCA for manipulating contracts and altering its competitive position to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars over the years to gain advantages over its competition, specifically GM. Marchionne believed he could operate outside the bounds of the system and believed he could manipulate the playing field to his advantage with impunity. Accountability was never a working part of Marchionne’s vocabulary, because like an Emperor, he made up his own rules as he went along. But facts are stubborn things, and this time I believe accountability is going to finally catch up with FCA. 

    And given what I know, I wouldn’t bet against GM on this one and I applaud the company for going after the carpetbagging mercenaries at FCA. GM has the goods on FCA, and it’s going to get ugly.

    The other thing this week? Well, of course it’s Tesla’s “Cyber Truck.” With a typically overhyped reveal – a Elon Musk specialty, or Muskian Nightmare, depending on your point of view – the “truck” was unveiled to the usual assortment of Muskolytes, hangers-on, and a few objective members of the motoring press, at least those who hadn’t been given IVs of the Muskian Kool-Aid beforehand. 

    As I commented on Twitter: Ask a designer and “Design Reach – projecting into new shapes and forms – is one of the toughest tasks to accomplish. When it works it’s a revelation; when it fails miserably it’s an instant abomination. Needless to say, the “truck” doesn’t work for me on any level. It’s a fantasy truck, designed to appeal to those who regret they never had the chance to go to fighter pilot school. 

    It’s clear to me that this “Cyber Truck is going to be a niche of a niche vehicle. It is no threat to what the mainstream truck manufacturers are doing, and besides, they will have fully-functional electric pickups of their own by late 2021. (Musk claims that the Tesla “Cyber Truck” will appear in 2021, but given his highly-dubious track record I wouldn’t expect it until 2022, if not later.) 

    And let me reiterate this notion of fully functional. The “Cyber Truck” is a long way from being that (the “protective glass” demo that went awry already underscored that, live and in color). Again, given Musk’s track record of letting buyers do the final development on its vehicles, to say it will trickle out in fits and starts is an understatement. The people who don’t blindly buy into the pronouncements from Dear Leader Musk understand this. The rest? Well, they already have a picture of the “Cyber Truck” as their screen savers; not much you can do with that, or them. The Muskolytes believe in whatever Musk tells them to believe and they will blindly proclaim their love for the Dear Leader, so that they might bathe in his brilliance.

    The Tesla “Cyber Truck” will be a niche of a niche, a “pickup” for elitist swells who truly believe they have it goin’ on. In fact, the entire BEV pickup space is going to be carved into little niches (see Bollinger, etc.). So, if you want to pretend that you’re an F22 pilot, Tesla has your number. As for the rest of the real pickup buyers out there? I’m sure they’ll do just fine without it. 

    And the third thing? Try, at least for a moment, to do your part to quell the rancor and chaos that has become part and parcel of our daily life here in America. Try to put aside the knee-jerk reactions and aggressive pronouncements; try to savor the moment of peace and be thankful for the blessings that you do have, instead of harboring resentments for what you don’t. 

    Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

    And that’s the High-Octane Truth for this week.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Occasionally, network news groups develop a well-researched article and this one is contemporaneous after the release of the Tesla Cybertruck.   It explores the economics of new car purchases for the median U.S family.   

    Can a middle-class budget buy a new American car? Probably not

    CBS News

    "CBS This Morning" is committed to finding out why prices for many common items have surged in recent years. Today, we look at the rising cost of cars.

    Americans were paying about 38% more for a new car or truck over the summer than they were just 10 years ago. The average transaction price for some popular vehicles is up nearly 50%, 60% or even 70%. So how are drivers affording it? As CBS News found, many are not.

    In Vineland, New Jersey, the typical family takes home about $39,000 a year after taxes. CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger recommended spending 10 to 15% of that income monthly on a vehicle. That leaves an average family there with about a $400 a month budget. 

    With that in mind, "CBS This Morning" co-host Tony Dokoupil visited family-owned Lilliston Ford. Manager Ivan Nelson showed Dokoupil a Ford Explorer, packed with technology. He also saw a powerful F-150 Lariat.

    But did any of it fit that $400 budget? Not even close.

    "Your monthly payment would be $853," Nelson said.

    And that's life for a record number of Americans these days. The big three automakers are retiring many family sedans while rolling out souped-up SUVs and trucks at premium rates that families often can't afford without taking on loans that are now larger and longer than ever.

    Nelson did find a simpler truck closer to our budget, but with a catch. The $446 monthly payments lasted for 96 months. That's eight years. And while long loans can create reasonable-sounding monthly payments, it doesn't always mean you can afford the car.

    More and more vehicles are ending up at repo lots. Last year, a record number of Americans fell behind on their car payments. More than 7 million people were at least 90 days late. And when that happens, people like CJ Faison get a call. His family sells repossessed vehicles at auction in Delaware. Dokoupil asked if he's seen more business. 

    "Tons," Faison said. "I would say it's probably doubled, if not tripled… [I] think mainly because there's people who are going longer terms on cars. They're more expensive. You owe more on the car than what it's worth."

    Faison said he thinks manufacturers have a role in that.

    "They have priced cars out of a lot of people's budgets," Faison said. "There's finance companies through these manufacturers now to let people afford these cars by stretching the loans out to six, seven, eight years on a car. That blows my mind."

    CBS News reached out to the three biggest American automakers about their role in setting vehicle prices, but none of them would go on camera to discuss pricing.

    Down south, Dokoupil searched for a better deal. In Winter Haven, Florida, a typical family income is about $35,000 a year after taxes, which means a responsible monthly car payment might be about $350.

    Dokoupil zeroed in on a new Chevy Impala, but once again his hypothetical budget was shot. The budget would comfortably allow a family to buy a Chevrolet Malibu. The model's average transaction price has risen just 8% since 2009, according to Edmunds. But the Malibu was out of stock at the dealership Dokoupil visited, so the only car in stock that was in the middle-class budget was the Spark, the smallest vehicle that Chevy makes. 

    In statements to CBS News, GM pointed to a "customer-driven trend to larger vehicles," and said "household incomes are rising too and interest rates are low," so "on a relative basis, new vehicles are a steal."

    Chrysler told CBS News it prices vehicles "based on what the customer wants and feels they are worth."

    Ford declined to comment for this story.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    146,000 deposits so far ....... some people like it


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    Tesla Model S P100d & Model X P90D & 2017 Sept 991.2 GT3. 2019 BMW M850i Convertible. Tesla Model 3 Performance on order. 


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    EnglishManInNY:

    146,000 deposits so far ....... some people like it

    Again, how many of those individuals that paid the princely sum of USD 100 will actually convert that deposit into a purchase?  If past performance, based on the Model 3 deposit numbers when the deposit was USD 1,000, is any indication, the conversion rate is far less than 50%.  

    Ford, for example, sells over 850,000 F-150 trucks annually with FCA and GM posting sales volumes not significantly less than Ford.   

    Tesla will have significant competition by the time the Cybertruck reaches production as both General Motors and Ford have announced EV pickup trucks in the same date range.  Do not underestimate the legacy automakers as Volkswagen, Mercedes and Ford have demonstrated that they posses the technical knowhow to produce competent EVs.  Also, Rivian's pickup is quickly heading toward production.  

    Once again Musk has squandered a significant lead in the marketplace with his consistently erratic, knee-jerk reactions.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Yep I am an Elon fanboy (and 911 GTx fanboy) but will def not be getting one. 


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    Tesla Model S P100d & Model X P90D & 2017 Sept 991.2 GT3. 2019 BMW M850i Convertible. Tesla Model 3 Performance on order. 


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Interesting, this is the Citroen Karin concept from 1980.

     


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    CGX car nut:
    EnglishManInNY:

    146,000 deposits so far ....... some people like it

    Again, how many of those individuals that paid the princely sum of USD 100 will actually convert that deposit into a purchase?  If past performance, based on the Model 3 deposit numbers when the deposit was USD 1,000, is any indication, the conversion rate is far less than 50%.  

    Ford, for example, sells over 850,000 F-150 trucks annually with FCA and GM posting sales volumes not significantly less than Ford.   

    Tesla will have significant competition by the time the Cybertruck reaches production as both General Motors and Ford have announced EV pickup trucks in the same date range.  Do not underestimate the legacy automakers as Volkswagen, Mercedes and Ford have demonstrated that they posses the technical knowhow to produce competent EVs.  Also, Rivian's pickup is quickly heading toward production.  

    Once again Musk has squandered a significant lead in the marketplace with his consistently erratic, knee-jerk reactions.  

    Worthy of inclusion into a time capsule. Like most of your posts. Priceless. 


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Leawood911:
    CGX car nut:
    EnglishManInNY:

    146,000 deposits so far ....... some people like it

    Again, how many of those individuals that paid the princely sum of USD 100 will actually convert that deposit into a purchase?  If past performance, based on the Model 3 deposit numbers when the deposit was USD 1,000, is any indication, the conversion rate is far less than 50%.  

    Ford, for example, sells over 850,000 F-150 trucks annually with FCA and GM posting sales volumes not significantly less than Ford.   

    Tesla will have significant competition by the time the Cybertruck reaches production as both General Motors and Ford have announced EV pickup trucks in the same date range.  Do not underestimate the legacy automakers as Volkswagen, Mercedes and Ford have demonstrated that they posses the technical knowhow to produce competent EVs.  Also, Rivian's pickup is quickly heading toward production.  

    Once again Musk has squandered a significant lead in the marketplace with his consistently erratic, knee-jerk reactions.  

    Worthy of inclusion into a time capsule. Like most of your posts. Priceless. 

    Go for it.  Add that post to your personal time capsule.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    lukestern:

    Good for him and I hope you are fully committed to purchasing a Cybertruck too, otherwise your posts here would ring hollow.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    CGX car nut:
    lukestern:

    Good for him and I hope you are fully committed to purchasing a Cybertruck too, otherwise your posts here would ring hollow.  

    I doubt Luke is buying one. The guy in the video above is the perfect example of who would buy such a thing, he didn't even need a truck and wasn't looking to buy one, but in his Tesla subconsciously primed mind all the circle jerk enthusiasm from fellow minions on presentation day got his to think it is "dope", perfect reason to buy a "pickup".

    That said, don't think he will take delivery in the end though, the effect will likely wear off much before it goes into production in 2 years. Cancellations on this model will be twice that of the Model 3 if not more. And this is in the US, outside the US there will barely be any orders at all since trucks are not very popular here, and in the third world this doesn't make sense.

    What a wasted opportunity for Tesla to enter the pickup market being first at EV versions, this will appeal to zero traditional pickup buyers, and there is only so many non-pickup Tesla fans that will buy this, zero impact on the pickup market in the end, and Tesla needs desperately to increase sales volume right now, not make limited niche cars.


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Be careful as I posted something similar and was called out by him and his Kansas City equivalent as being consistently against Tesla.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    No, I won't get a truck. It's too big and I don't need a vehicle in this category. I still think it's cool and admire Tesla for being brave and different and hope they continue to move the goal post and challenge the otherwise rather conservative auto companies. This makes it much more fun for us customers and will give us better producs. At least this is how I see it. When it comes to my own car purchases I'd either get the refreshed Model S or a Taycan as my next daily driver.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    CGX car nut:

    Be careful as I posted something similar and was called out by him and his Kansas City equivalent as being consistently against Tesla.  

    For a company that lives off hype to secure investments to survive along with their crowdfunding scheme of customer deposits for vaporware models instead of profits from selling cars, they have shot themselves in the foot with this, they lost touch with reality inside their bubblr. This doesn't create hype at all in the general public, only the fan boys which lets lets it, would get hyped even if Tesla came our with an EV Pontiac Aztec.

    Add to this the consistent new model production delays and lies about actual delivery times from Musk, and the big 3 will have acceptable looking and versatile EV trucks before this one hits the street, further choking its puny market share.


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS

     


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    lukestern:

    No, I won't get a truck. It's too big and I don't need a vehicle in this category. I still think it's cool and admire Tesla for being brave and different and hope they continue to move the goal post and challenge the otherwise rather conservative auto companies. This makes it much more fun for us customers and will give us better producs. At least this is how I see it. When it comes to my own car purchases I'd either get the refreshed Model S or a Taycan as my next daily driver.

    Why even consider the Porsche when its parent company is one of those conservative automakers? According to you there is no substitute.  


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    CGX car nut:
    lukestern:

    No, I won't get a truck. It's too big and I don't need a vehicle in this category. I still think it's cool and admire Tesla for being brave and different and hope they continue to move the goal post and challenge the otherwise rather conservative auto companies. This makes it much more fun for us customers and will give us better producs. At least this is how I see it. When it comes to my own car purchases I'd either get the refreshed Model S or a Taycan as my next daily driver.

    Why even consider the Porsche when its parent company is one of those conservative automakers? According to you there is no substitute.  

    Even Blume and Diess have admitted that Tesla have had a big impact on their time lines and pushed them to come up with good EVs faster than anticipated. So my point is that Tesla have already impacted the otherwise conservative automakers  in a good way for us customers. If it wasn't for Tesla, Taycan would probably not have been around already today.

    Just because I have a positive attitude towards Tesla and happen to like what they're doing doesn't mean that I only will buy Teslas. I'm not black or white and will get what appeals to me most at a given point in time. Taycan is a great car and I will probably get one just to try it out for myself. At the end of the day it's just cars we talk about and they're easy to exchange.


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Many Youtubers are getting the cybertruck. I bet Tesla is giving it away for publicity.

    Like this influencer/youtuber: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj_2l3HtSqQ

     


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Topspeed:

    Many Youtubers are getting the cybertruck. I bet Tesla is giving it away for publicity.

    Like this influencer/youtuber: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj_2l3HtSqQ

     

    My IQ dropped 30 points after watching the first minute of that video before I turned it off...


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    I don’t understand why someone’s positive impressions of anything would lead to insults. It’s okay if you like or don’t like the truck or anything for that matter but it is simply not cool to constantly attack people who don’t agree with your point of view. Just tell us how you feel about the truck. The telling us how you feel animosity toward those who like something you don’t care for just let’s us know what you are all about.  You otherwise know nothing about about these people so it mostly reflects poorly on you. I don’t call anyone names who does not agree with me. I let them enjoy their opinion (unless they insult me but you all know that). 
    It is the unjustified attack on people for their preferences (they are not hurting anyone) which leads to group think and far worse. Let’s try and find nice things to say about people and keep criticizing just the car or design, specs whatever. Everything else is a weak attempt at logic / persuasion / polarization which never adds up to success. It does spread the confirmation bias and emboldens others to escalate the problem. Who wants that?  No wonder discussions here go south.  
    maybe I should be a moderator?   Okay, you all can stop laughing. I’m done joking. 


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    Leawood911:

    I don’t understand why someone’s positive impressions of anything would lead to insults. It’s okay if you like or don’t like the truck or anything for that matter but it is simply not cool to constantly attack people who don’t agree with your point of view. Just tell us how you feel about the truck. The telling us how you feel animosity toward those who like something you don’t care for just let’s us know what you are all about.  You otherwise know nothing about about these people so it mostly reflects poorly on you. I don’t call anyone names who does not agree with me. I let them enjoy their opinion (unless they insult me but you all know that). 
    It is the unjustified attack on people for their preferences (they are not hurting anyone) which leads to group think and far worse. Let’s try and find nice things to say about people and keep criticizing just the car or design, specs whatever. Everything else is a weak attempt at logic / persuasion / polarization which never adds up to success. It does spread the confirmation bias and emboldens others to escalate the problem. Who wants that?  No wonder discussions here go south.  
    maybe I should be a moderator?   Okay, you all can stop laughing. I’m done joking. 

    In your predictable knee jerk reaction with anything Tesla related you missed the mark, nothing to do with the truck this time, and more to do with another unbearable bird brain youtuber influencer with zero substance on why the young blond is buying a 6m bullet proof pickup truck as she interacts with her sidekick doggie for the camera...


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Tesla Roadster

    The cyberquad is interesting. That I would buy. For my backyard indecision


    --

    Tesla Model S P100d & Model X P90D & 2017 Sept 991.2 GT3. 2019 BMW M850i Convertible. Tesla Model 3 Performance on order. 


     
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