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    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Looks very nice & modern in white, but can anyone confirm whether it will look like this 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    The problem is: There is no EV I was waiting for... Smiley Smiley


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Lamborghini Huracan Performante (2019), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    RC:

    The problem is: There is no EV I was waiting for... Smiley Smiley

    There will never be a EV I will wait for... Smiley


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    We're at the point where you can be the fastest or just sound like you're the fastest.



    The secret of life is to admire without desiring.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    "Welt am Sonntag" newspaper ... 16th of June ... still using Mission-e rear .... no trunk visible ... strange behaviour from Porsche

     

    bb680814-552f-4c95-b312-3453cf4890aa.jpg


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    BMW i8 * RRS * BMW i3s


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    “The Taycan’s proportions are unique”

    Taycan, exterior sketch, 2019, Porsche AG

    (28 June 2019)

    Mr Mauer, with the Taycan there will soon be a Porsche on the market that is like no other before it. This marks the dawn of a new era in many respects – also in terms of design?

    It was indeed one of the most exciting yet challenging tasks, simply because there was nothing to build on. Still, we didn’t start from scratch because we knew that this new model had to be recognisable as a Porsche at first glance – in other words it had to embody what I call brand identity. With the Taycan, we continue to consistently pursue the strategy of offering the sportiest vehicle in every segment in which we are represented. In terms of design, this is initially expressed in the proportions. Sports cars have a more dramatic width-to-height ratio than other vehicles. And I would go so far as to say that we have redefined the architecture of purely electric vehicles to a certain extent.

    Michael Mauer, Head of Porsche Design Department, 2017, Porsche AG

    In what way? What’s so special?

    The Taycan is absolutely unique in terms of its proportions. Usually, purely electric vehicles are higher than their conventionally powered counterparts because the relatively heavy and large batteries are positioned in the floor of the vehicle while the occupants sit above them. We were not willing to accept this. However, you can’t just install the batteries in a different place – for reasons relating to driving dynamics alone – as the centre of gravity must be as low as possible. Because you also can’t just make the vehicle wider, the specific challenge was to position the passengers as low as possible without them having to assume a reclined position like in a Formula 1 racing car. We solved this with so-called “foot garages”. They enable a comfortable sitting position even in conjunction with the sporty vehicle height. In retrospect we can say that this so-called package was the greatest challenge. How high can the vehicle be? How long and how wide should it be, how horizontal or upright will the passengers sit? That’s what’s typically Porsche to me – this striving to find the ideal solution.

    How early were you involved in development?

    From the outset. That’s the most important prerequisite for a design strategy. In the past, the package would have frequently already been defined when we joined the project. Consequently, a fundamental design decision had already been made at this point. In this context, I always like to explain our process, which essentially consists of three steps: proportions, styling and details. The proportions are elementary. If they are not right, you can’t really do much retrospectively with styling and details.

    Was it clear from the beginning which direction development was going to take?

    We had many discussions, particularly about the package. At times, we also considered launching into e-mobility with an SUV, but ultimately we made the decision to take this important step for Porsche with a sports car in order to make a clear statement. The question was how clearly do you indicate that this is the dawn of the new, purely electric era? Does this mean we have to change everything?

    What is your opinion?

    With a brand that is as strong as Porsche, it would not be a good idea to ignore all of the brand’s characteristic design elements. For me personally, there are always two components: firstly the brand identity – I recognise that it’s a Porsche. Then there is the second level, product identity – which Porsche is it? The brand identity is shown by different characteristics, starting with the proportions. It is demonstrated in the special topography of the bonnet and the front wings, the air intakes instead of a dominant radiator grille, our “flyline”, the falling roof line, and a strong shoulder at the rear. These are elements that characterise every Porsche. Differentiation then takes place at product identity level.

    You explained that the Taycan is your first attempt at defining the appearance of models with alternative drives.

    Yes, that’s correct. In terms of product identity we give each model series its individual characteristics – which Porsche is it? One of the crucial elements we have defined in this context is the shape of the headlights. We have invested plenty of development time in this element and developed a concept that we are now showing in detail for the very first time, around three months before the world premiere. It goes further than with previous models and is characteristic in terms of the product identity of our purely electric vehicles. The four-point daytime running lights, which are not as dominant today, are not only evident from the light pattern, but also from their shape. This sculptural design is important, as it’s the main element at the front. Modern lighting technology gives us fantastic options in this context.

    It probably also helps the design that you aren’t forced to fit a large combustion engine under the bonnet?

    This results in greater freedom for the Taycan, whereas it’s a completely different challenge for the Panamera or Cayenne. We can base the design more on the 911, and that helps significantly in terms of brand identity. However, we are going one step further within the context of product identity: aerodynamics and air flow quality are especially important for all-electric models because they greatly influence the range. For this reason, we did away with traditional headlights here and used a light source located in the air intake instead. The air enters laterally from the front and exits again behind the wheel housings. The air flow at the wheels is therefore calmer, bringing about significant aerodynamic benefits.

    Were you able to adopt features from the Panamera? After all, it is also a sporty, four-door vehicle.

    It goes without saying that we have benefited from the experience gained with the different Panamera generations. In the side view, I think that the downward slope of the roof line, our flyline, and the appearance of the side windows are particularly successful design elements, for example. However, as there is always the objective of giving the model an individual product identity, it was clear that the Taycan must not look like a small Panamera. And it doesn’t. The differences are so great that there is no risk of confusing the two.

    This brings you back to the challenge of reconciling the goals of both recognisability and differentiation. It needs to be familiar, yet seem new at the same time.

    You have exactly this effect when you look at the rear of the Taycan. On the one hand, you recognise the brand’s identity featuring a strong shoulder, what we call the recessed “greenhouse”, with beautiful proportions and surfaces that are as clean as possible. Obviously the Taycan doesn’t have tailpipes, so we emphasised the aerodynamics and focussed intensively on the rear diffuser which in turn represents the product identity of purely electric vehicles. The light bar running across the rear reflects our fundamental philosophy, where we introduce new elements through the product identity, which then have the chance to climb up a level and become part of the brand identity. Originally only the all-wheel drive 911 models featured a light bar, and now all Porsche models have it. The task now is to differentiate the feature again for individual model series.

    Did you also discuss redesigning the crest with the introduction of the Taycan?

    It is well known that we have repeatedly adapted the crest over the years. I am of the opinion that the brand’s trademarks should also evolve – just like we recently updated the model logo of the new 911 generation upon its launch. I would say the lettering has become slightly more jagged, and we will be adopting this for the Taycan. We have indeed already experimented with black-and-white crests as a high-quality engraving in aluminium on the bonnets of showcars. This creates a more contemporary impression, but breaks with tradition. Ultimately we opted to keep the current crest.

    Speaking of tradition, how is design work changing as a result of digitalisation? Do you still need traditional tools?

    Let me put it this way: creativity is still paramount and we draw that from designers’ minds, not digital pens or intelligent milling machines. However, we have become much faster because we can simultaneously work in the physical and digital worlds. Today, we can create data models from simple sketches and immediately reproduce them as 3D graphics on computers or large video screens. This is very attractive and accelerates processes, but I remain a firm believer that it is no substitute for crafting a physical model. There are things you just can’t see on a computer that will only stand out in reality. Sometimes you need to design a surface on the basis of mathematically “incorrect” parameters to make sure it has the right effect later. In some instances you will even be unable to state a reason why – you just have a feeling. For this reason, we still rely on tried and tested clay models up to a scale of 1:1 where each surface and each line is created by hand.

    It’s reassuring to know that you can’t express everything in formulas.

    It goes without saying that it’s also a cost factor, but I believe that you can tell if extra care was taken to design a vehicle. In my eyes, one of the greatest challenges is reminding myself that I am not designing the vehicle for myself, but for customers. They quite rightly expect an exclusive product that also demonstrates quality craftsmanship. The surfaces are charged with an engaging tension, with convex, concave, and everything flowing together. These are also signs of quality. Our customers greatly value this – and I’m sure they will continue to do so in the future.

      

    And this future will now also be all-electric at Porsche, at least to some extent. Surely these are also exciting times for you personally?

    Definitely! I started at Porsche when the development of the Panamera initiated a massive extension of the product range. We are now once again at a crucial stage for the company. It’s something very special to carry responsibility in these times. My vision is that the Taycan will become the icon of this new era, almost like a synonym for a purely electric sports car. Just like what the 911 has achieved in its segment over the past decades.

    Link:  https://newsroom.porsche.com/en/2019/company/porsche-taycan-exterior-sketches-michael-mauer-interview-17991.html

    Smiley 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Mauer is a master of saying very little very well. Nice to hear him say that the Taycan does not look like a small Panamera.  

    I am attending the press debut in Frankfurt and getting excited...


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    https://www.motor1.com/news/357344/porsche-taycan-caught-almost-naked-shanghai/

     


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    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Carlos from Spain:

    https://www.motor1.com/news/357344/porsche-taycan-caught-almost-naked-shanghai/

    Wow! From this image (especially the rear half) it looks more a stretched 911 than a baby panamera... I Like it! 


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    Porsche, separates Le Mans from Le Boys


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    The lack of an ICE makes a much shorter front end possible, and I agree, this looks a lot better than the Panamera.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    This car is so far Carlos from Spain:

    https://www.motor1.com/news/357344/porsche-taycan-caught-almost-naked-shanghai/

     

    The most beautiful 4 seater concept in recent years has turned into a Baby Panamera. Tech aside, Porsche didn’t have the guts to create something truly beautiful. On top of this rear legroom is little more than Macan. A lost opportunity. 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Those photographs are of a car still wearing significant amounts of camouflage so prudence on its overall appearance is  required.  The Mission E was Porsche's market research on new design elements as well as technology, some of which make it into production as other elements do not.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    1562189399500image.jpeg

    Smiley


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

     I know the car is still camouflaged, but it’s going to take a lot of improvement for me to like it. The rear looks OK, but I’m disappointed with the side, and the front light structures look way too big for the car. Hope I’m wrong...


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    It looks more and more like a 4 door 911...


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Not bad IMO but nothing to get excited about. It's the expected shape for those who like the contemporary Porsche style.

    Pity about the powertrain angry


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    "Porsche....and Nothing else matters"

     


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Wonderbar:

     I know the car is still camouflaged, but it’s going to take a lot of improvement for me to like it. The rear looks OK, but I’m disappointed with the side, and the front light structures look way too big for the car. Hope I’m wrong...

    The headlamps will ape those of the Mission E and includes the vertical slash of the concept car. 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    I recently talked to someone involved in Taycan development and he seemed very worried if they finish the car in time for the IAA presentation in autumn.


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Lamborghini Huracan Performante (2019), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

     


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    lukestern:

     

    Lol at 0:38 - it is so quiet most people didn’t realise it went past! Just like the change from steam engine to combustion engine, electric is a change for the better. Taycan is a first step, but looking forward more to first fully electric Boxster and 911. 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    We are two minor breakthroughs away from making ICE vehicles obsolete... (battery weight and charging time).


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Li, atomic number 3 is about as light as you’re going to get...

    Fuel cells maybe...


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Porsche Taycan ride review: electric game-changer (Car magazine)

    (12 July 2019)

    The 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed saw the UK debut of the new Taycan, the first electric debut of Stuttgart's first EV – and a huge car for the brand. 

    Driven by Mark Webber for its first run, the Taycan zoomed by with that peculiar woosh that EVs make, and if anything looked composed – and almost sedate – from the outside. Later on in the weekend, however, we got a ride in Porsche's first EV – and found it's anything but. Just watch the video of a hillclimb in the EV. 

    Online editor Curtis Moldrich described the EV’s acceleration as 'relentless and seamless' thanks to the constant torque and lack of shifts – but ultimately still felt it handled like a Porsche. That was partly down to the seating position – which is the same as the 911 – and also down to the mid-corner poise and the wealth of grip the car can find on exit. The Taycan actually has a lower CoG than the 911... 

    Even in the passenger seat it was clear the Taycan will allow you to get on the power super-early, and seemingly teleport its front-end to the next apex. Surely, then this is a car you'll be able to push, adjust and play with.

    But before we rode in the Taycan at the Festival of Speed at Goodwood, our European editor Georg Kacher had already experienced the EV with Porsche’s chief engineer Stefan Weckbach – you can read his thoughts below. 

    Porsche Taycan ride review: No smoke, plenty of fire

    Riding in an all-electric Porsche Taycan with chief engineer Stefan Weckbach is like a Marvel fantasy adventure augmented by virtual reality headset and F1 simulator. We leave Porsche’s Weissach test centre, strike out onto the road, and the very first g-force attack feels like a cocaine bomb that hits the brain before the nose. 

    This pre-production Taycan Turbo prototype features a beefy 96kWh lithium-ion battery weighing 650kg. It juices a 215bhp/221lb ft motor on the front axle, and a 402bhp/406lb ft powerplant at the rear. All told it’s a vast 649lb ft of peak torque, or 738lb ft in the 10-second overboost window.

    In launch-control mode, it’s as though your eyeballs are being squeezed to the back of your skull. Porsche claims just over three seconds from take-off to 62mph, and to 124mph in sub-10 seconds. Acceleration is brutal enough to shred the driveline if it weren’t for the protective torque limiter, the two-speed transmission that can block first gear to prevent mechanical disintegration, and the electronic rear diff lock.

    The Taycan isn’t just about spectacular acceleration: it’s happy to cruise at 162mph for miles without battery heatstroke or exceeding the motors’ 16,000rpm maximum. Nor is it unduly focused on high-velocity autobahn runs. This car’s true forte –  just like so many Porsches – is monstering empty secondary roads on which the low-riding two-tonner is every bit as quick as the lighter and nimbler 911 Turbo – it’s even lapped the Nordschleife in under eight minutes.

    High-tech dynamic goodies are key. The complex set-up includes air suspension (except on the base car), all-wheel drive (rear-drive for the base car), rear-wheel steering on some models, 48-volt anti-roll bars, active aerodynamics, and steel brakes with serious stopping power. The pulse inverter that masterminds the torque vectoring acts five times faster than chips that govern conventional four-wheel-drive systems. Forget stability management by brake actuation: the Taycan’s black box controls everything by wheel-selective torque feed. ‘Zero loss, 100 per cent dynamic efficiency,’ grins Weckbach.

    Genetically, this DNA is more closely related to the 992-generation 911 than the Panamera. In fact, the Taycan actually sports an even lower centre of gravity than its rear-engined brother, in large part because more than half a tonne of batteries are mounted low down and cooled by a liquid circuit integrated into the floorpan.

    When we reach a suitably quiet stretch of road, the driver suddenly ups the pace. The stability-control warning symbol starts flashing. Sport Plus firms up the ride, adds macho steering and quickens the throttle response. And the optional sound generator adds bass to the oomph, like the subdued hum of a synthetic multi-cylinder boxer engine.

    This sudden eruption of extra energy does little to disrupt the cool professionalism of the chassis. The directional stability is unerring, and there’s breathtaking grip and traction from what these days must be classed as relatively modestly-sized 275/40 ZR20 tyres. Even at speeds that – being unfamiliar with the Taycan – you might expect to be overwhelming, there is absolutely no tugging, twitching or fidgeting, almost as if we’re magnetised to an induction loop running beneath the road surface.

    The chassis’ one de-merit is a lumpy ride, despite the potentially calming effect of the generous 2910mm wheelbase (shorter than a Panamera, longer than a Macan, much longer than a 911) and substantial kerbweight (estimated at just under 2100kg, which is in the Cayenne’s ball park). In so far as you can tell anything from the passenger seat, this ride leaves no doubt that the Taycan will handle like a true Porsche.

    Braking is similarly impressive. All Taycans will be equipped as standard with specially-coated PSCB brakes for reduced brake dust, but you can also specify overkill carbon-ceramic stoppers. One of the biggest challenges facing the development team was blending the conventional disc-and-pad system with regenerative braking via the e-motors; plenty of other electric cars offer a compromise that seems to give too much emphasis to recharging the battery and too little to driving pleasure. But this is a Porsche, and that wouldn’t play at all well among the faithful.

    Weckbach says they’ve cracked it with software that progressively dials out the e-motors as hydraulic braking kicks in. He claims nothing recuperates energy this effectively, and describes a totally progressive pedal feel. 

    Performance vs range

    Selecting Range mode helps extend the Taycan’s mileage by about 10 per cent. Rather than enfeebling your right foot, it achieves this by scaling back the air-con and adjusting the torque vectoring, though it automatically checks out above 85mph, having twigged that you’re not fully committed to stretching the range. Unless the driver activates mild-recuperation mode by pushing a button on the steering wheel, gently lifting off the throttle prompts free-wheeling – Porsche is not interested in slowing the car down unless conditions require it, unlike rivals with one-pedal driving, where a lift off the gas results in braking.

    It all seems to be working. Porsche promises a 320-mile range and we’re on course for that, having been cruising swiftly through the Weissach hinterland for over two hours now, with the battery still showing 48 per cent charge. It’s a lithium-ion unit provided by LG, with a total of 408 pouch cells packaged in 34 individual modules. Performance is said to go the distance, too. 

    Bernd Propfe, platform director for the Taycan, claims you can do 10 full-throttle 0-62mph and four 0-124mph sprints without a decrease in performance. Even if you choose to drive flat out for an hour or more, the Taycan is programmed to let you; it will only go into limp-home mode once the distance-to-empty reads zero. Neither should ambient temperature be an issue, with a -35ºC to 45ºC window. The Tesla P100D is quicker off the mark, but it’s this repeatability of performance, say the Porsche people, that will make the difference for committed drivers.

    Porsche has done all it reasonably can to stop range anxiety being a problem. Charge anxiety might be a trickier fix. The Taycan is the first EV that can be fed with up to 250kW at an 800-volt charging point, but the infrastructure is at best patchy. Even those lucky enough to discover one of a handful of 400-volt stations – most of which can typically muster only 150kW – will have to play Grand Theft Auto for at least 40 minutes before the power pack is 80 per cent full. Imagine being number four in the queue.

    Taycan charging times: room for improvement

    However, with technology coming on in leaps and bounds, the Taycan’s charge times and performance are set to quickly improve. By 2021 at the latest, peak charging power is set to increase from 250 to 350kW, which should – in combination with those latest 800-volt charge points – reduce charging time to a swift 14 minutes (although, of course, you’d be appalled if you needed to spend 14 minutes filling your car with petrol). In contrast, a plug-in domestic job takes up to 30 hours. Upcoming inductive charging ability is initially restricted to a measly 11kW. Solid-state power packs will be phased in as they become available, and battery weight will come down as energy density goes up. 

    But let’s not get ahead of ourselves, because even for the first models, technical data are still to be taken with a pinch of salt. Taycan production has already started in an extension of the Zuffenhausen parent plant, with potential peak capacity close to 60,000 units per year, but we’ll have to wait until September’s Frankfurt show unveiling for detailed facts and figures about the car.

    Porsche Taycan model range as we know it

    This much we do know: the base Taycan is rear-drive only, sports a 80kWh battery and is powered by a choice of 322bhp or 376bhp motors. The next model up, which for now we believe will be badged Carrera 4S, is equipped with a 96kWh battery pack, and offers 429bhp or 483bhp. The top model – the ‘Turbo’ we’re driving – will cost perhaps £120,000. All-wheel drive and the bigger battery are standard on the more powerful two versions. An even more potent 724bhp Turbo S and a lighter rear-drive GTS are still to be signed off.

    What's the Porsche Taycan interior like?

    But as it stands the Taycan Turbo is indecently rapid. With my heart still in my boots, I’m grateful for every speed limit and urban area that comes our way, and these short breathers present a welcome opportunity to check out the cabin ambience. The Taycan is a four-seater with just about enough space for two adults in the back where the ‘foot garage’ – a rectangular recess in the floor made possible by bespoke shaping of the battery – helps accommodate long legs.

    Up front, eye-catchers include power-operated lightweight bucket seats and the curved boomerang digital display, which harks back to early 911s. An additional rectangular monitor on the passenger side is offered at cost. The multifunction steering wheel is peppered with 10 control elements distributed across the two horizontal spokes, the conveniently positioned centre stack is loaded with haptic and visual adventures, and if the main full-width multi-content screen is not enough, extra money buys an extended head-up display. You can specify your Taycan without leather in the cabin. 

    Like most recently launched MMI infotainment systems, the Taycan’s needs an in-depth introduction to unlock hidden skills. The selective display puts the focus on speed, state of charge, consumption, range and, when needed, the location of the closest charge points. There’s an autopilot function that will be activated as soon as regulations permit, just like in the Audi A8 it’s borrowed from. ‘It was our goal to create reduced, user-focused, increasingly voice-based ergonomics which provide only the information you need, to reduce distraction,’ says Weckbach.

    Porsche Taycan ride review: early verdict

    So what is the provisional verdict from this shaken and stirred front passenger? Well, the Taycan is good looking and solid as a rock even at ludicrous speeds, a remarkable high-performance GT that can’t wait to set the seat of your pants on fire but leaves behind a virtually invisible CO2 footprint.        

    The car’s motions are subtly coherent and nicely fluent, following the driver’s instructions with aplomb, and the expertly tuned electronic back-up brigade acts in a subtle and sensitive fashion. The one asset that sticks in the memory more than any other dynamic virtue is the amazing tarmac-hugging flatness. For all the Taycan’s deviations from Porsche tradition, that single, crucial quality shows that the same high standards are being followed. From a brand that left behind air-cooled flat-sixes only two decades ago, the Taycan looks like a highly convincing leap to a fully electrified future. 

    Link:  https://www.carmagazine.co.uk/car-reviews/porsche/taycan-ev/

    Smiley 


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Nice infomercial. Funny how it leaves out the actual miles driven and battery usage for range calculation, or just even the range number on the dash angry This was clearly not a random omission, so until we see the real numbers, they have something to hide. As a funny side note and because I always relate my experience without sugar coating it, I extrapolated a usable range of 120 miles after some spirited driving around my summer house with the X. After this I am finally starting to feel like it could be fun to be even faster (my is the standard non Raven one, the P shaves another 1.2s 0-60).

    The Taycan will be a fantastic car no doubt. Nice to see Porsche putting some real money behind it. Expect the top Taycan model well optioned to be a stone throw from the Tesla roadster in price.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    There is no doubt the Taycan is a properly good car, but the final version is too close to the Panamera and the Panamera Turbo S is simply the better car hands down, there are still too many limitations for EV car.

    The Audi e tron however just popped into my radar, as I planned on trading in my Cayenne Turbo S for the Panamera Turbo S and a replacement SUV might be needed for the odd occasion that a SUV is needed.

     

     

     


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    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    If you don’t need it for a lot of long trips the ETron is a nice car inside and out, and the price is right. But so you know, on a cold winter day it should make Vancouver/Whistler if driven hard but you better leave with a full battery.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    I already tested the ETron and love it...I'm waiting for the new BMW X3 electric to decide about the next family car....nevertheless I'm not 100% sure if full EV is the way to go when I have "only" one familty car!


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    SciFrog:

    If you don’t need it for a lot of long trips the ETron is a nice car inside and out, and the price is right. But so you know, on a cold winter day it should make Vancouver/Whistler if driven hard but you better leave with a full battery.

     

    It's night and day, well light years ahead and nicer than Tesla. Cheaper too.

    But I really don't know what I am gonna use it for. Probably just gonna be sitting at home plugged in even if I buy one.

     


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    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Hopefully they don’t make it so stupidly expensive I will have to buy another tesla to feel I got some value for money before the depreciation kicks in.......


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    Tesla Model S P100D & Model X P90D & 2016 BMW i8 & 2017 Sept 991.2 GT3 ordered. 2020 Porsche Mission E on order


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    Whoopsy:
    SciFrog:

    If you don’t need it for a lot of long trips the ETron is a nice car inside and out, and the price is right. But so you know, on a cold winter day it should make Vancouver/Whistler if driven hard but you better leave with a full battery.

     

    It's night and day, well light years ahead and nicer than Tesla. Cheaper too.

    But I really don't know what I am gonna use it for. Probably just gonna be sitting at home plugged in even if I buy one.

     

    They are not in the same category. The X is a X7/GLS, the Etron is between a Q5 and a Q7... The Model Y will compete with the Etron and it will be much cheaper at equivalent specs. You get what you pay for.


    Re: Porsche Mission E...the future of Porsche?

    SciFrog:
    Whoopsy:
    SciFrog:

    If you don’t need it for a lot of long trips the ETron is a nice car inside and out, and the price is right. But so you know, on a cold winter day it should make Vancouver/Whistler if driven hard but you better leave with a full battery.

     

    It's night and day, well light years ahead and nicer than Tesla. Cheaper too.

    But I really don't know what I am gonna use it for. Probably just gonna be sitting at home plugged in even if I buy one.

     

    They are not in the same category. The X is a X7/GLS, the Etron is between a Q5 and a Q7... The Model Y will compete with the Etron and it will be much cheaper at equivalent specs. You get what you pay for.

     

    In your mind it is.

    Size wise the e-tron and the Model X is just about the same size, while the Model X can seat 2 more adults, the trunk of the e-tron is bigger. 

    The Model X doesn't compare well with it's peers, the Pacifica also seats 7 but with much more cargo room when fully seated, Sienna also the same thing and also offer 4wd just like the Model X. Odyssey seats 8 AND carry more cargo. Oh, the Model X also is much much more expensive compared to it's peers.

    Model Y is vaporware in your speak. Now if the much more expensive Model X already have a cheaper interior than the cheaper e-tron, what happens to the cheaper 'soon to come' Model Y? A Corolla interior? How can that compete with the e-tron?

    Anyways, the e-tron is a done deal. I had a look at it yesterday and bought it on the spot. Will be away so won't be taking delivery until next Friday. That interior is really second to none, fit and finish, materials used, all top notch.

    As for your question why I pick the 'inferior' e-tron in the other thread, here is my answer to you. A EV is a golf cart, period. Golf carts are used for going around golf courses or going from the house to the course within a golf community, for that purpose it works really well. My e-tron will be used exactly like that, for doing city trips. You been to Vancouver, we don't need to use the highway to go somewhere, so it will be for mostly city driving in traffic, exactly the same scenario like a golf cart on a golf course. For that purpose I don't need a golf cart that do 2.4 seconds 0-60, the extra oomph from a Tesla over a e-tron is useless and pointless. But the much much better interior will be much appreciated while stuck in traffic and stuff. 

    And it's CHEAP! The loaded e-tron I just bought is only 100k CAD, the incoming smaller Taycan Turbo S  is more than double that, a loaded Model 3 is only slightly cheaper but with a really cheap interior while a loaded Model X is almost doubled that at 185k CAD but also with a really cheap interior. It really is a no brainer to pick the e-tron.

     

     

     


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