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    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet -- First Drive by Autocar...

    Porsche 911 3.8 Carrera S First Drive

    Test date: 9 February 2012
     
    What is it?
     
    The Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet is the open-top version of the latest 911 Carrera coupé and is due to follow its closed-roofed relation onto the UK market next month.
     
    Like its sister, the 911 Carrera Cabriolet is significantly lighter, slightly longer in wheelbase and wider in track, more powerful and more fuel-efficient than the previous generation of 911 Carrera soft-tops.
     
    Despite lopping at least 45kg from the kerb weight of the cabrio, Porsche also claims to have improved dynamic torsional rigidity by 18 per cent over the previous iteration.
     
    Cabrio 911s have the same flat-six engines as the coupés, with the £79,947 Carrera featuring the 3.4-litre version that has 345bhp, 236lb ft of torque and a standstill to 62mph figure of 5.0sec.
     
    The £89,740 Carrera S is fitted with the 3.8-litre powerplant that produces 395bhp and 325lb ft and can cover the 0-62mph sprint half a second quicker.
     
    Both variants come with seven-speed manual gearboxes as standard but, providing you can pronounce ‘Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe’ to your dealer, you’ll be able to order the Stuttgart manufacturer’s excellent dual-clutch transmission.
     
    With PDK come slighter quicker 0-62mph times, fractionally lower outright top speeds and, more significantly, improved fuel economy. On the subject of efficiency, all 911 Carreras are now fitted with stop-start as standard.
     
    If you’re still not impressed by the eye-widening acceleration of the PDK-equipped 911, you can specify the optional Sport Chrono Package. It comes with a ‘Sport Plus’ setting that further sharpens up the car’s dynamics and transmission, with a claimed 0-62mph time of 4.3secs.
     
    What’s it like?
     
    Structurally, the Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet is fractionally lower than the hard-top variant, but we’re talking a difference of a few millimetres. The car’s interior, too, follows the coupé and takes some styling cues from the Porsche Panamera.
     
    The main head-turning feature is the all-new ‘panel bow top’ roof, the frame of which is constructed from fabric and composite plastic and sits on a frame made of magnesium and aluminium.
     
    This new roof has several packaging benefits, not least that Porsche has been able the follow the profile of the coupé’s roofline more closely than it could with the old-style multi-layered fabric structure. Dropping the roof is a case of pushing a button on the centre console – 13 seconds later the structure is neatly stowed away under the compartment lid.
     
    The 911 Carrera S Cabriolet features a wind deflector that can be deployed from the cockpit, so there’s no faffing around trying to fit a deflector that lives in the boot. Although it can’t eliminate all wind noise and buffeting, the reduction in the amount of cockpit ‘swirl’ with the deflector raised is dramatic.
     
    Despite weighing 50kg more than the coupé and losing that roof, the cabriolet handles deftly and with composure on most roads. Dreaded cabriolet ‘scuttle shake’ seems pretty much non-existent – at least it did on our test drive on a comprehensive selection of road surfaces in Gran Canaria. Even pressing hard over some broken, uneven asphalt didn’t seem to untowardly unsettle the car thanks to Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM) – a ride-smoothing system that isn’t featured on all versions.
     
    If it lacks quite the same level of driver engagement as the closed-topped version, it makes up for it with its assault on the senses when you’ve got the roof down. The 395bhp is deployed in smooth waves, and with maximum power so high in the rev range, you sometimes wonder if you’ll ever scale the peak of it.
     
    Combined with that, the exhaust note has a range that would make an opera singer jealous. At town cruising speeds the cabriolet burbles along with just enough noise to remind you what’s sitting over your shoulder. On the open road, it comes alive with a captivating, ever-changing soundtrack.
     
    The 911 Carrera S Cabriolet’s brakes are outstanding, offering confidence-inspiring levels of progressive bite, and the new electro-mechanical steering – discussed at length elsewhere – hasn’t turned into the bane of this new Porsche as was feared.
     
    Our test car was fitted with PDK transmission. The little throttle blips it effects on down changes in auto mode are pleasingly neat and precise, although the transmission doesn’t require the same level of involvement as a manual. The PDK also made use of the ‘coasting’ fuel-saving system that’s a feature of the double-clutch gearbox. When you lift off the throttle gently, the system disengages the gear that you’re currently in. If you touch the brake or throttle, the gear is re-engaged.
     
    It’s an uncanny feeling to be cruising along in a thoroughbred sports car with no engine noise, even only intermittently. Almost as unsettling as stop-start; Porsche’s system is undoubtedly clever, but it can also be obtrusive in a way that you don’t tend to notice on less sporty, quieter cars.
     
    Should I buy one?
     
    Yes, as long as that £90k price tag (for the Carrera S) doesn’t scare you off. The tweaks and improvements Porsche has made to the cabriolet compared to its predecessors mean it is certainly worth every penny, but this mature sportscar has a grown-up price tag to match.
     
    The 911 Carrera Cabriolet is a ‘serious fun’ car: on one level there are sumptuous levels of luxurious refinement and sophistication, but underneath there lurks a demonic glint of sports car steel. Tap into that, and it’s a rewarding experience
     
    Those occasions when you can drop the roof and get over-friendly with the throttle, unleashing the full sonorous rasp of the flat-six behind you, are both spine-tingling and grin-inducing. Okay, the coupé will remain the pure drivers’ option, but it would be a shame if this cabriolet is only used for posing on continental seafronts.
     
    Sure, there are cheaper – and you could possibly say more charismatic – ways to get your drop-top thrills, but it’s a struggle to think of alternative convertibles that are as complete as this.
     
    Porsche 911 Carrera S cabriolet (PDK)
     
    Price: 118,441 euros (UK price tbc); Top speed: 186mph; 0-62mph: 4.5sec; Economy: 31.7mpg; CO2: 210g/km; Kerb weight: 1485kg; Engine: flat six, 3800cc, petrol; Power: 395bhp at 7400rpm; Torque: 325lb ft at 5600rpm; Gearbox: 7-speed dual-clutch
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Cabriolet -- First Drive by Auto Express...

    Porsche says the 2012 911 Cabriolet is its best-looking, best-handling drop-top ever – we find out if that's true...
     
    (February 2012)
     
    In the world of the 911, the Cabriolet has never been the traditionalist’s choice. Not as good looking as the coupe, or quite as focused, Porsche enthusiasts have always dismissed the drop-top as a car for those who like to cruise rather than drive. 
     
    But that’s all about to change with the new 2012 911 Cabriolet. Thanks to an extremely clever hood design, the new cabrio is as handsome as the coupe when the roof's up – and with a stiffer, yet lighter chassis than the old car, it promises to be just as good to drive. 
     
    The Cabriolet carries an £8,498 price premium over the coupe, meaning prices start at £79,947 for the 3.4 Carrera and £89,740 for the 3.8 Carrera S. But with an open roof giving the flat six-cylinder engine even more chance to serenade the driver, is the Cabriolet now the one to have?  
     
    It certainly has the kerbside appeal. Thanks to a new structure that allows the entire hood to be tensioned over four different sections, designers have managed to keep exactly the same sleek silhouette as the coupe with the roof in place. Drop the roof, and it hides beneath a subtle cover, doing as little as possible to interfere with the car’s lines.  
     
    Magnesium is used in the rear window frame, and together with the new aluminium-steel body, the Cabriolet weighs up to 60kg less than the old car. Other highlights include an integrated wind deflector – which folds out at the touch of a button – while you can raise or lower the hood in just 13 seconds at speeds of up to 35mph. 
     
    Elsewhere, it’s the same as the Coupe. So that means a new chassis with a longer wheelbase, a wider front track and new electro-mechanical steering, in addition to a higher quality cabin, with a Panamera-style centre console.  
     
    It hasn’t always been the case, but these days it’s easy to find a perfect driving position in a 911. The steering electrically adjusts for rake and reach, and even tall drivers will be able to get the sport seat low enough. 
     
    Just grasping that trademark thin-rimmed wheel is enough to get the pulse racing too – and the Cabriolet proves a fantastic driver’s car on the move. Our test car was a 345bhp 3.4-litre Carrera with the optional seven-speed PDK semi-automatic transmission. 
     
    The engine makes an incredible noise, ranging from a metallic rasp at low revs, changing to a deeper roar as speed increases, with a definite kick in the back as the needle hits 4,500rpm.  Switch to Sport mode, and the volume increases. Roof down, you can hear every single note – and it feels more involving than the coupe. 
     
    Porsche claims 0-62mph in 4.8 seconds, 176mph, 33mpg and just 198g/km of CO2 – figures which reveal just how fast yet efficient the new 911 really is. 
     
    With perfect gearchanges just a flick of a steering wheel paddle away  – downchanges are accompanied by a lovely blip of the throttle – the PDK transmission offers the kind of control that all levels of driver will enjoy. However, we still love the seven-speed manual and its beautifully placed pedals, which make heel and toeing easy.  
     
    In corners, the 911 Cabriolet is in its element. There’s barely a hint of shake or shimmy from the loss of the roof, and the ride, while firm, is pretty compliant given the incredible grip the car generates. Sport mode stiffens things up a bit and is a good compromise, but Sport Plus sees everything get a bit too jiggly unless you’re on a super-smooth piece of road. 
     
    The overriding impression, though, is of a car of huge ability. You’d have to be Porsche’s chief test driver, ex-rally ace Walter Rohrl, to notice any reduction in agility compared to the coupe. It turns into corners beautifully, feeling more eager than the old Cabriolet and yet more stable too. 
     
    What’s really impressive is the 911 Cabriolet’s duality. Slot the lever into Drive, put the suspension into normal mode and raise the roof, and it becomes a refined GT car in which you can cover distances with ease. 
     
    There are some downsides. The PDK box can kick-down even in manual mode, when you simply want it to rely on the torque of the engine. And when it comes to £80,000-plus drop-tops, an Audi R8 Spyder makes a bigger statement, while a Jaguar XK Convertible is more elegant.
     
    Despite the roof’s ability to reduce noise, the 285-section rear tyres still make a racket on some motorway surfaces, and roof-down the hump which contains the roof mechanism does create a bit of an over-the-shoulder blind spot. 
     
    But like the Coupe, the new Cabriolet is a brilliant all-rounder. We reckon even traditionalists will love it. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    We just posted our second full review (including video and new exterior/interior photos of various combos), as well as notes from friendly late night discussions with Michael Schaetzle. Hope the reading will be interesting to some. Enjoy !

    More "making off" pics here as well.


    --

    997 GT3 - 550M - 355 GTS F1 - Prius - Audi S5 Sportback


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express...

    "We put the new 911 Carrera S through its paces on track and snowy Welsh roads..."

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Autocar...

    "The new Porsche 911 is the most important new sports car of 2012. Thanks to an all-new platform, revised engines and improved dynamics, it's more poised and competent than ever..."

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Autocar -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Carrera S Convertible video by Sport Auto...

    Porsche 911 Carrera S Convertible video by Sport Auto -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porsche 911 Carrera S -- Test Drive by WSJ...

    Porsche's Magnificent First Stab at the New 911...

    (11 February 2012)

    Porsche's approach to the 911 is "perfect, rinse, repeat"—which is to say, introduce a new edition of its famous sports car, and over the years of the product cycle squeeze more and more bloody glamouring intoxicants out of it until there's no more to be had, and then start over with a new-generation 911.
     
    This strategy is not without its downsides. Consider our test car, a 2012 911 Carrera S, the first year of the code-named 991 generation. How are we to receive this car? As a quantum improvement over the previous generation, the code-named 997? It is roomier, quieter, faster and more summarily athletic, which one would expect. This car is nearly 14 seconds faster around the Nürburgring than the outgoing model, which is seriously more than one would expect. The redesign of the cockpit has scourged the 911 of the stubborn cheapness that affected the previous cars. The new cockpit, with its banked and switch-laden central console like the Panamera, is futuristic, sternly elegant and purposeful, limned in rich alloys of aluminum and wrapped in more taut, tanned hide than a Miss Hawaiian Tropic pageant.
     
    And there are now back seats, of a sort. The 991's wheelbase is 3.9 inches longer, while overall length is up 2.2 inches (track is up, too, marginally). The added Y-axis is largely devoted to making the rear seats more habitable for vertebrate life-forms.
     
    So, yes, the new car is a significant step forward for the breed. However, because we've sat through the "Neue" Porsche 911 movie six times since 1963, we also know that the new car is not nearly the car it is going to be. Porsche first presents a new-edition 911 as a sort of baseline—indeed, deliberately un-optimized in terms of performance—with room for improvement pre-engineered in, if you will.
     
    If I had 100 grand burning a hole in my sports-car pocket, this might give me pause. We know the folks in Weissach have left themselves development space (literally, as in cubic centimeters around the chassis) to add more power—a 4.0-liter engine, perhaps, a freer-breathing exhaust, certainly, and maybe even the rumored triple-turbo induction (is there a German word for "Boo-yah"?). There will be in due course an all-wheel-drive 4S, Turbo S, GTS, and the lightweight GT2 and GT3 club racer versions, with even more enormous brakes, more wretchedly gluey tires, and ever-angrier computer programming. And we know for sure there will be a full-hybrid 911 coming in this product cycle, perhaps as soon as 2014. Indeed, conjecture has it the 991's additional length and wheelbase is there primarily to accommodate the hybrid hardware, still in development.
     
     
    “A ripping, scalping, torque-wrenching, swivel-hipped snake of a car—and that's just so far.”
     
    I put it to you: Are you buying the latest and greatest when you buy this car, or are you buying a dialed-back, choked-down version of the glorious car that the 991-series Porsche will become in the fullness of time? When do you pull the money trigger? As a corollary, is it ultimately better to buy the last year of a previous-series 911—see my review of the outgoing and fully optimized GTS from a few weeks ago—or the new car?
     
    Such questions vex the gods.
     
    And the weirdest part for me is that this 911 is actually going to get better, when it is already such a ripping, scalping, torque-wrenching, swivel-hipped snake of a car. Start with the fact that it is 88 pounds lighter (figure 3,250 pounds) than the smaller, outgoing model, and substantially stiffer, thanks to Porsche's profligate use of high-strength steel and aluminum. Tito Puente never knew a drumhead so tight.
     
    Dynamically, the biggest single improvement with the 991 comes with the optional active antiroll feature, which uses hydraulic actuators at each corner to correct for changes in camber. This system, which is undetectable to the driver, helps keep the big 20-inch Pirellis fully planted in corners, adding another dimension to the 911's asphalt-fanging, corner-carving agility. Theoretically, a longer wheelbase should have made the 991 less responsive. So much for theory.
     
    You like to go fast, do you, missy? Here's an off-the-rack sports car with lateral adhesion in the range of 1 g, a car that hits 60 mph in 4 seconds (the 394-horsepower Carrera S with the dual-clutch PDK gearbox), a car that trips the trap lights in about 12 seconds and decelerates from 60 mph to 0 in about 100 feet. These numbers reflect the enormous electromechanical leverage the computers hold over the road—particularly the active antiroll hydraulics—but the experience behind the wheel is decidedly untechnical, a kind of sinister and primal euphoria. I get out of this car very much inclined to bite the head off a pigeon or something.
     
    This is important. A lot of fast street cars feel slightly damp from all the dynamics software onboard. The Nissan GT-R, for instance, is a hellacious piece of machinery and, by the numbers, quite a bit faster than even the new 911. But the GT-R doesn't make you oath and curse like a Viking as the 911 does. If anything, Porsche has managed to dial up the immediacy of the 911, with quicker reflexes—the electrical steering is first-rate—a more emotional exhaust note and, at full throttle, the capacity for real, edgy violence. You need only drop the Porsche into second gear and nail the throttle. The car will swat you like you have "Titleist" on your backside.
     
    Above 4,000 rpm the max torque (325 pound-feet) comes on and stays on until 5,600 rpm, supplying big whoops with each dab of throttle. Lovely.
     
    All this torque barks through one of two transmissions: the first, a seven-speed double-clutch automated manual, the PDK, now with proper paddle shifters available as an alternative to the Tiptronic-style two-way buttons on the steering wheel, which I loathe. The second, for those who really have it bad, is Porsche's new, weirdly retro seven-speed manual, with the seventh-gear gate to the far right, somewhere near the glovebox. The manual is much slower than the double-clutch gearbox but it's a nice, irrational touch for irrational people.
     
    The car's performance envelope opens from the bottom, too. With the active exhaust system turned off (muting the mighty tailpipes) and the car's fuel-saving stop-start system engaged, the Carrera S is notably servile around town. The naturally aspirated, direct-injection 3.8-liter flat six mutters quietly, awaiting its chance. The suspension compliance is velvety, the throttle response relaxed. Porsche's product planners would like the new 911 to appeal to more women. Just call me Nancy.
     
    This car is a work in progress? More like an unfinished masterpiece.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Porsche 911 Carrera S -- Test Drive by WSJ -- Article Link

    Porsche 911 Carrera S -- Test Drive by WSJ -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    WOW! maybe the best write-up till now! Perfect speccs also! In -20mm guise the car looks so cool!


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    A few pics of a Porsche 991 Carrera S from a test drive in Sweden...

    ...thanks and all due credit to Mike J in Sweden!

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 Carrera S -- Test Drive by WSJ...

    What a level-headed, well thought out article from the WSJ.  And who would have thought a brown 911 would look so nice..?!


    --


    Porsche Carrera GTS (2012); Porsche Cayenne Diesel (2012)


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    My thoughts exactly, very cool shot angle wink


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Attended the Porsche function last night at the dealership. They had four 991 two S's and the other regular 991. Interesting, the S's were on display in the showroom while the basic 991's were relegated to the parking lot.

    The interior of the 991 is vastly better than the 997. A considerable improvement. However, the exterior to me and to many others at the function was a bit of disappointment. Honestly, the car looks better in pictures than in person. The only way I can describe my reaction to its appearance is the car is between a sport car and a transport car. I suppose that is what Porsche was striving for and they have succeeded.

    However, the purity and classic style of the 911 has been savaged to address changing demographics and competition. I was thoroughly unimpressed. Hopefully the Turbo will bring back some of the rawness and aggression that the 991 lacks. surprise


    --

     


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    At the moment, and after liking the 991 for most of its parts ( except front blinkers ) , I am getting already tired of the line at the back surprise This novelty has worn off very quickly . I start to see 991 once and a while in town, and that line at the back is too intrusive and has spoiled the nice rounded shape of the 991.

    I would probably still buy the car , but instead of liking it better , I am liking it less and less and finding the 997 actually quite nice looking. 


    --

     997.2 C2S, PDK, -20mm


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Gnil:

    At the moment, and after liking the 991 for most of its parts ( except front blinkers ) , I am getting already tired of the line at the back surprise This novelty has worn off very quickly . I start to see 991 once and a while in town, and that line at the back is too intrusive and has spoiled the nice rounded shape of the 991.

    I would probably still buy the car , but instead of liking it better , I am liking it less and less and finding the 997 actually quite nice looking. 

    I agree. Sitting stationary, I don't really like the rear. In fact, all around I prefer the design, look, fit, finish, style, and character of the 997. I like the 997 better I guess you could say. The proportions of the rear on the 991 look a little bit off. The 997 has just such a simple classic 911 design.

    But, I have to admit, in videos where the 991 is in motion, it looks astonishing from every single angle! And the sound!

    I love the 991, it's a fantastic car! I just prefer the 997.Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Gnil:

    At the moment, and after liking the 991 for most of its parts ( except front blinkers ) , I am getting already tired of the line at the back surprise This novelty has worn off very quickly . I start to see 991 once and a while in town, and that line at the back is too intrusive and has spoiled the nice rounded shape of the 991.

    I would probably still buy the car , but instead of liking it better , I am liking it less and less and finding the 997 actually quite nice looking. 

    Perhaps you should order the Porsche Exclusive ducktail. The line is gone.

    porsche_991_02.jpg


    --

    "Form follows function"


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    I didn't even notice a line there until it was just mentioned.


    --

    2005 997S Blk/Blk


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    I too prefer the styling of the 997.  I saw the 991 at Rennsport Reunion in October and was NOT impressed.  Car looks bigger and less sporty to my eye, even though performance figures are better.  I will hang on to my C4S for a few more years and see what Porsche offers come makeover time in 2016.  Looking forward to seeing the new Boxster and Cayman when they appear.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Budster:
    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 Carrera S -- Test Drive by WSJ...

    What a level-headed, well thought out article from the WSJ.  And who would have thought a brown 911 would look so nice..?!

    so  you think this is antracite brown and not agate gray? really hard to tell imo.


    --

    2010 997.2 turbo cab 6 speed / 08 Cayenne GTS Manual - 08 RS 60 sold -04 C4S sold - 08 Cayenne Turbo PDCC sold


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    reginos:
    Gnil:

    At the moment, and after liking the 991 for most of its parts ( except front blinkers ) , I am getting already tired of the line at the back surprise This novelty has worn off very quickly . I start to see 991 once and a while in town, and that line at the back is too intrusive and has spoiled the nice rounded shape of the 991.

    I would probably still buy the car , but instead of liking it better , I am liking it less and less and finding the 997 actually quite nice looking. 

    Perhaps you should order the Porsche Exclusive ducktail. The line is gone.

    porsche_991_02.jpg


    While I like the ducktail at the 997 Sport Classic and the Carrera RS 2.7 of course, I find it looks odd and totally out of place at the new 991. Smiley


    --

    The secret of life is to admire without desiring.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Went to my dealers 991 event today, and drove a Carrera S briefly for half hour.  To me, this car is such an improvement--in design, performance, interior sophistication--compared to the 997.  Each enthusiast can differ certainly, but that's my take.  Car was Agate Grey/black--stunning...

    Only negative for me is too much aluminum trim in the cabin.  I would tune it down with carbon, or at least brushed aluminum.  Also, did not get used to the paddle shifters--kept hitting the windshield washer stalk!  Car revs up so quickly, I did not time the shifts well.  What a klutz--pretty embarassing for me with my 10 year old son in the back...


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Agate Grey (on a grey, frigid day).  thanksgiving and greenbrier 042.jpg


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    What a great looking 911!  Excellent job, Porsche. Smiley


    --

    2005 997S Blk/Blk


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Car and Driver: Manual and PDK
     

    a-tale-of-two-porsche-seven-speeds-manual-and-pdk-photo-437848-s-original.jpg


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express...

     

    "We put the new 911 Carrera S through its paces on track and snowy Welsh roads..."

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Awesome, informative review! Top quality imo. Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porker:
    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express...

     

    "We put the new 911 Carrera S through its paces on track and snowy Welsh roads..."

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Awesome, informative review! Top quality imo. Smiley

    @ Porker: I don't know if you've realised it, but that mountain road is one of the ones you could have taken on your trip back from Ireland with your BMW.  


    --

    fritz


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Don't know if it has been posted yet, but GRIP's tribute to the 997. Very fitting tribute imo!

     

     


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    fritz:
    Porker:
    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express...

     

    "We put the new 911 Carrera S through its paces on track and snowy Welsh roads..."

    Porsche 911 Carrera S video review by Auto Express -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Awesome, informative review! Top quality imo. Smiley

    @ Porker: I don't know if you've realised it, but that mountain road is one of the ones you could have taken on your trip back from Ireland with your BMW.  

    I'm actually planning a return trip with that car, I was so impressed with the roads and atmosphere there... Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Porker  thanks for the great video.


    --

    2006 997 C2S Cab, Triple Black,  2006 Cayenne Titanium Iceland Silver Metalic New York


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    I wish I could speak German!


    --

     911 Carrera 3.2 - Cayenne Diesel


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991... (LAUNCH thread)

    Mikla:

    I wish I could speak German!


    You didn´t miss much. GRIP is the automotive equivalent of the yellow press´ automotive section. The most entertaining part are the driving scenes, dialogue and content is not really their strong point.


     
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