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    Re: 991 Speedster

    Josef:
    Gnil:
    Porker:
    I know a certain Swiss company that likes to work that way. Smiley

    One that sells cars ? Smiley They are far from being the only ones . At each Porsche cup  track event , they are at least 20 cars ( GT3 , RS , GT2 ) sent down by truck . 

    Actually I once calculated the depreciation vs the truck cost and at the end it is probably cheaper to take the truck then to all miles on the car 

    Interesting point. Did you only compare the depreciation with the truck cost or did you also add the additional cost to go to the track (by plane or another car)?

    It was not that precise , as the selling price of a car is also pretty vague to guess . I did take into account the drive down with a car , but did not count the depreciation of that other car Smiley   The difference was not huge . 


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Agree with most here that the Speedster`s list price is too much, probably about $50K more than my anticipation.  But since I have committed in my mind to get one, I will just proceed.

    Depreciation and Holding value is never a factor in car buying to me.  First thing with delivery I will drill the front bumper and mount license plate.  I may even track this Speedster one day.  We will see.indecision


    --

    Tim

    2010 997.2 GT3RS;  2008 Cayenne Turbo;  2006 911 Club Coupe;  2016 911 GTS Club Coupe;  2015 Macan S
     


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Targa Tim:

    Agree with most here that the Speedster`s list price is too much, probably about $50K more than my anticipation.  But since I have committed in my mind to get one, I will just proceed.

    Depreciation and Holding value is never a factor in car buying to me.  First thing with delivery I will drill the front bumper and mount license plate.  I may even track this Speedster one day.  We will see.indecision

     

    And paint it blue!


    --

     

     


    Re: 991 Speedster

    I do not think that the base price is worth a penny above $180k...


    Re: 991 Speedster

    SciFrog:

    I do not think that the base price is worth a penny above $180k...

    if I don't spend it, wife will spend it on more handbags (that she does not need), so might as well...


    --

    Tim

    2010 997.2 GT3RS;  2008 Cayenne Turbo;  2006 911 Club Coupe;  2016 911 GTS Club Coupe;  2015 Macan S
     


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Whoopsy:
    Targa Tim:

    Agree with most here that the Speedster`s list price is too much, probably about $50K more than my anticipation.  But since I have committed in my mind to get one, I will just proceed.

    Depreciation and Holding value is never a factor in car buying to me.  First thing with delivery I will drill the front bumper and mount license plate.  I may even track this Speedster one day.  We will see.indecision

     

    And paint it blue!

    of course, blue is faster Smiley


    --

    Tim

    2010 997.2 GT3RS;  2008 Cayenne Turbo;  2006 911 Club Coupe;  2016 911 GTS Club Coupe;  2015 Macan S
     


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Targa Tim:

    Agree with most here that the Speedster`s list price is too much, probably about $50K more than my anticipation.  But since I have committed in my mind to get one, I will just proceed.

    Depreciation and Holding value is never a factor in car buying to me.  First thing with delivery I will drill the front bumper and mount license plate.  I may even track this Speedster one day.  We will see.indecision

    In any case, that amazing engine screaming in the back with the top down must be quite an experience, looking forward to hearing your impressions when you get it!


    --

    ⇒ Carlos - Porsche 991 Carrera GTS


    Re: 991 Speedster

    SciFrog:

    I do not think that the base price is worth a penny above $180k...

    It is if it comes with authentic cocoa floor mats....

    Really it's a cool car, priced right for emotion driven buyers and probably more fun to drive then a Turbo S.


    Re: 991 Speedster

    margin on this one is probably around 100% indecision


    --

    GT Lover, Porsche fan

    991.2 GT3 manual, 991 GT3 2014(sold)

    Cayenne GTS 2014


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Gnil:

    It was not that precise , as the selling price of a car is also pretty vague to guess . I did take into account the drive down with a car , but did not count the depreciation of that other car Smiley   The difference was not huge . 

    Thanks for the clarification, I was just wondering. In the end, you have to do what pleases you most. Put the track car on the truck and drive down with a Roadster, not too bad indecision


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Josef:
    Gnil:

    It was not that precise , as the selling price of a car is also pretty vague to guess . I did take into account the drive down with a car , but did not count the depreciation of that other car Smiley   The difference was not huge . 

    Thanks for the clarification, I was just wondering. In the end, you have to do what pleases you most. Put the track car on the truck and drive down with a Roadster, not too bad indecision

    Exactly . Do what gives you the best pleasure .Smiley At the end , it will only be a few thousands difference anyway . 


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: 991 Speedster

    RC:
    DaveC:

    Holding value depends greatly on condition and low mileage, i.e. non-use.  So the purpose of the car, the pleasure of driving, becomes lost in the pursuit of value retention. The logic of the limited production collector car is entirely lost upon me.

    Very true. People buy Speciale Aperta, La Ferrari, 918, etc. and drive them, maybe up to 5000 km in a couple of years, so the cars loose little value. So where's the pleasure in that? I already put this weekend 1200 km on my Performante, I plan to put 1300 km more next weekend, so the car is finally run in. I will drive it at least 30000, maybe 40000 km over the next couple of years, I don't care about the value. If it goes up, great. If not, so what? In these coming years, I am pretty sure I am going to have the time of my life. Smiley Smiley

    Respect man, that is a cool approach


    Re: 991 Speedster

    FWIW:  Driving impressions embargo is on until the 15th of May.


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Tim, no doubt the car is overpriced but getting at MSRP is a gift and no brainer to buy. Contrary to what many believe, this is one limited production car you can put miles on and it will not significantly lose its value. But for it being a manual, I would have pressed my dealer for an allocation. Even then, I probably would not been able to get one. You have a winning lottery ticket.kiss


    --

    There is nothing stronger than gentleness.


    Re: 991 Speedster

    I think I might have been wrong about the emargo: "May 14 @ 3:01pm PST"   might be the right end of embargo.


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Kobalt:

    I think I might have been wrong about the emargo: "May 14 @ 3:01pm PST"   might be the right end of embargo.

    So Kobalt, how is it to drive ? 


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Amazing!


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Kobalt:

    Amazing!

     

    Thanks, was worth the wait. 😀


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Targa Tim:

    Agree with most here that the Speedster`s list price is too much, probably about $50K more than my anticipation.  But since I have committed in my mind to get one, I will just proceed.

    Depreciation and Holding value is never a factor in car buying to me.  First thing with delivery I will drill the front bumper and mount license plate.  I may even track this Speedster one day.  We will see.indecision

    Awesome, way to go... guess people should stop worrying about depreciation and pristine condition. Enjoy the car, that’s what matters.


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Kobalt:

    I think I might have been wrong about the emargo: "May 14 @ 3:01pm PST"   might be the right end of embargo.

    That would be May 15th, 1 minute after Midnight in Europe...


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Ferdie:
    Kobalt:

    Amazing!

     

    Thanks, was worth the wait. 😀

    SmileySmiley....it's called "speechless"


    --


    Re: 991 Speedster

    From Pete Stout of 000 Magazine (from Rennlist post):

    Now, to some driving impressions:

    Surprise #1: HD Throttle
    The new individual throttle bodies (ITB), a 25% bump in fuel injector pressure, and a new Bosch engine management platform have been employed to counteract the new particulate filters required to meet Euro 6 emissions standards. The result is something my co-driver and I quickly nicknamed “high-definition throttle response.” It feels like a sort of 21st Century MFI, only more accurate/precise. No bad thing, this. Frankly, I cannot recall any Porsche with greater sensitivity to what my right foot is up to—whether it’s on, off, rolling into, rolling out of, or modulating throttle. Put simply, the throttle response with this setup is brilliant—and adds up to more confidence, more pace, and greater accessibility to the Speedster’s power. How does that manifest itself? It’s subtle, and I can see where some may go on to disagree with me for this (and there is always some risk in sharing impressions gleaned from one day with a car!), but where I find it tricky/hectic to obtain the last 1000~ rpm of a GT3 or GT3 RS between bends in second or third anywhere other than a race track, it’s very easy and “unalarming” to do so in the Speedster. YMMV, but I find that to be a not so subtle upshot. Where so many GT3s feel hairball when you’re after them, this one doesn’t, so you end up using more of the engine more of the time…and feel safer doing it. This is a boon, in my opinion, and if the last 991.2 GT3 RS will get this setup, I suspect those will be special cars in terms of track use. Ditto for the next generation of GT3s, if they will also use this system. Time will tell, as Porsche didn’t want to talk future product.

    Surprise #2: Pinpoint Accuracy on Downshifts
    The lightened dual-mass flywheel, when paired with the new engine’s throttle response, is simply fantastic when it comes to heel-toe work. It’s very easy to get in this car and start nailing every heel-toe downshift, at least it was for me. I’d put the margin of improvement at 10-20% on what was already a great setup in previous cars. As light and revvy as 911R? Perhaps not as a result of the flywheel alone, but other gains (losses, actually) elsewhere in the rotating mass make this a very free-spinning flat six. The only criticism I have in this area is the occasional “hang up” on the way down when you push the clutch in or blip the throttle. The tach needle hangs at 2000 rpm (or wherever it is) for a moment before dropping down…kind of like the old Z3 2.8 did in order to meet emissions targets. Engineers confirmed this is a matter of smoothing out emissions, but, unlike the old Z3 2.8, it isn’t an every time kind of thing. In fact, it only did it a few times during the day, usually on the approach to an intersection upon clutching in. Can’t remember it ever getting in the way while we were “after it” on the road. We did have a few cases of light detonation on heavy throttle inputs at low rpm, but it was light and dealt with quickly; the engineers present noted not great gas on Sardinia, something I’d be curious to hear more about from our resident Sardinian here on RL. And, if the gas on this Italian island was so-so, then there’s more power to be had from the engine on the good stuff.

    Surprise #3: Unlike Previous Speedsters, the Top is Very Well Engineered
    Unlike the 997 top (and every previous Speedster top dating back to the 1950s), there really is no practical downside to the 991 Speedster top in use. The only electric element is the latch at the windshield, but this is intuitive in use when putting the top up and down. It’s the first thing you do when leaving your seat to put the top down, and the last thing you do when returning to the driver’s seat to drive off. The rest of the process is seamless and easy, with the only possible demerit being raising the manual top out of the well from one side adds too much leverage to one side if you’re doing it by yourself—but you can work around this in the way you approach the job. With the top up at speed, it’s clear that the interior is fully sealed. While we didn’t get any downpours, my suspicion is this is a top properly engineered to withstand the car’s 192-mph top speed as well as whatever the elements throw at it. I was told the top’s development, the new A-pillars, and the integration of GT3 running gear is what drove the price up far higher than the 911R—which didn't require a new body in white. Considered from another direction, the 991 Speedster gets a Motorsport flat six and transmission along with chassis bracing and all of the GT3 chassis gear where the 997 Speedster was a 997 GTS Cabriolet with a different (and in my view, inferior) top. Yes, the 997 Speedster was far rarer, but was it more desirable?

    Surprise #4: The Speedster is Quieter than Expected
    Going into this, I wondered if the Speedster would be the best sounding “hardcore” Porsche since the Carrera GT—a fair bet for the first roofless GT3. A drive in fellow Rennlister JP’s fantastic Arena Red 993 Speedster a while back only fed into that expectation, as the valley between its nacelles seemed to pipe the air-cooled engine’s noises right into my ear. Fantastic. So it was no small surprise when my co-driver and I both found that the 991 Speedster’s engine noises are collectively quieter than a GT3 or GT3 Touring (let alone an RS or 911R), and the reason for this is more than a matter of the particulate filters—it’s a matter of introducing what is effectively a second firewall and a “box” between the driver’s ears and the engine. That new Speedster top and its nacelles creates more insulation between your ears and a flat six that’s a long ways back there. In fact, all we could really hear was exhaust noise…never intake or engine noise. With the top down, you have the firewall way back there that any coupe does and then a well filled with a thick fabric top and its frame (that isn’t relegated to the extreme rear of the cabin, as in a Cabriolet) plus then another “wall” just behind the seats. Top up, it’s still pretty quiet inside the cabin when it comes to engine noise—at least by the standards set by GT3s, 911Rs, etc. So we put the top back down pretty quickly, and ran with Sport Exhaust on at all times (though we couldn’t tell a huge difference between the modes, as in the past). Caveat: It’s unknown how much louder, if at all, North American cars will be without the particulate filters. Their mesh replacements to replicate the back pressure of the particulate filters may allow more noise. Let’s be clear here, however: This is not a “quiet” car by normal sports car standards. It’s only “quiet” by our crazy GT3 standards. I am sure other drivers in Sardinia could hear the Speedster’s flat six whenever we stepped on the gas to pass a vehicle, and you can always hear the exhaust from the driver’s seat when you’re on it. I wouldn’t say the car is too quiet for me, but there are plenty of people who uncork current GT3s. While it’s hard to convey the volume and soundtrack in words (or video, for that matter), I’d say the new Speedster’s exhaust note is more 991.1 Carrera GTS/X51 (no bad sounding device!) with a harder edge and another 1200 rpm to play with than 911R or GT3. Make sense?

    Surprise #5: Despite 991.2 GT3 Spring Rates, the Speedster Rides Beautifully…
    …so much so that we ended up both preferring to run the Speedster in Sport PASM at all times, even when the road was a bit rougher. The damping in this chassis is simply fantastic, and indicates that lessons learned by Motorsport after the “freeze” on 991.2 GT3 settings have been applied here, or that development of this car based on GT3 development have paid off, big time. Never once did we wish for more body control, and never once did the car feel over- or under-damped—or, for that matter, under- or over-sprung. The chassis tuning is, in a word, perfect. That isn’t a compliment I pass out lightly. Car also had direct and pinpoint accurate steering, fantastic front end grip, brilliant roll couple, and great traction out back leaving bends. The PCCB brakes were, as always, brilliant, and all this plus the insanely intuitive throttle response added up to what might just be the most approachable GT3 variant yet. The brief was “911R without a roof,” and it’s interesting that Motorsport has managed to create such a comfortable, approachable chassis without resorting to softer springs. Credit the chassis brace under the top cartridge and calibration genius gleaned from projects such as the 918, 991 GT2 RS, etc.

    Surprise #6: The Speedster has Less of an “Edge” than You Might Expect
    The revised engine and the six-speed manual gearbox are both brilliant, as are the chassis and brakes. Having now driven all versions of the Speedster save the 964 wide-body variant, this is the best driving, best performing Speedster yet—hands down. And yet… I drove harder and harder, as quickly as I’d want to go on public roads (particularly roads I don’t know), and found myself looking for a bit more…edge. The Speedster is very polished, and while I appreciate that level of polish in many cars, part of what keeps me coming back to the GT franchise is an edge that keeps me on edge. When my co-driver wanted to experiment with ESC Off to see if it would sharpen the car, all my hackles went up. Had it been any other driver but maybe two to three drivers I’ve gotten to know on these trips, I would have said no thanks. Not on the street, and not with me in the passenger seat. But we tried it. While he was the first to question whether it was placebo effect, he felt the car was a bit keener, a bit more willing to turn in. A bit sharper. I tried the same later, and found the same—while questioning my perceptions also. In speaking with an engineer about it that night, the engineer said that it is possible, that it would make sense for the torque-vectoring to sharpen things up for a driver confident enough to go ESC off. I found it interesting that these are safety nets I feel no need to defeat in other GT dept cars on the road, yet I preferred the Speedster this way…as I was after more “edge” in the experience. One engineer told me the edge is there, that you have to push further—and that I might find it on roads I know better. Could be, but I gotta say I was pushing about as hard as I’d like to on public roads (largely because the car was so good I felt comfortable to do so), and the Speedster was perfection yet left me wanting for a bit more “hairball.” In discussing that with some of those involved with the project, they seemed quite interested but also made a point: While this is the first Motorsport-developed Speedster and the first open Motorsport-developed 911 road car, it was set up differently to be different than a GT3 coupe for a different customer—or the same customer who will enjoy this 911 differently. It is more 911R without a roof—more road-oriented and aimed at the GT3 customer who wants to enjoy the car on a sunny day with their significant other. I can see that, and if that was their brief, they nailed it. The Speedster offers GT3 performance in a more approachable that will be an awfully nice way to travel through the wine country, etc. Front trunk remains as useful as in any Carrera or GT3, and I was surprised by how perfect the bays behind the seats were for more luggage. Two people could easily travel in this car for weeks at a time. One last thought about the "edge" I found myself seeking: I wonder about tweaks to the alignment settings…and whether some added "edge" is to be had there given the adjustability of the GT3 suspension. Something to consider, as well.

    These were the six big takeaways (or six groupings of multiple takeaways) for me. The car is very well executed per Motorsport's stated goals, being more “open 911R” than “open GT3,” but it is something new from the shops in Weissach-Flacht. If you’ve got questions, please feel free to ask them…

    __________________
    pete @ 000


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Porsche 911 Speedster review: hardcore 991 swansong driven (Top Gear magazine)

    (14 May 2019)

    Wait, isn’t that the old 911? Very well spotted. The new 992-generation Porsche 911 may currently be melting our expectations of how well-rounded a sports car can be, but the outgoing 991-gen hasn’t quite retired yet. This 911 Speedster is its spectacular send-off, a roofless, rear-engined Porsche with motorsport nous coursing through its veins. A motorsport convertible. Say what? Yep, the needs and wishes of keen drivers and keen tanners rarely overlap, but there’s more to this Speedster than meets the eye. Overseen by Andreas Preuninger – affectionally known as ‘Mr GT3’ – it has every bit as much credibility as the 911 GT3 and GT2 models, despite appearing, on first acquaintance, a bit tartier. For want of a more eloquent word.

    Beneath the skin, its chassis is a cocktail of 911 Cabriolet and GT3 bits, with the latter’s screaming 4.0-litre flat-six slotted behind the back axle. Only here it’s tuned to be even sharper, even harder cored. Yikes. So while a new, emissions-focused exhaust system lowers the volume a bit, the engine gets individual throttle bodies and even higher-pressure direction injection, freeing another 10bhp (power now totalling 503bhp) and making the throttle even more responsive than before. The auto blip function of the manual gearbox is now so finely developed, even Preuninger himself never turns it off for DIY heel-and-toeing. Though rest assured you still can turn it off, driving nerds. It’s a cabrio. Surely an auto’s optional? Nope. Unlike the GT3, there’s no PDK paddleshifter on the options list. Every single one of the 1,948 Speedsters being produced is manual. “Fun is more important than the figures,” Preuninger tells us, so there have been no Nürburgring lap targets, either. This is a feelgood car first and foremost.

    Having spent his last couple of decades modifying soft-top 911s at home, Preuninger has always wanted to make a car like this, and the Speedster popped into his head at the same time as the mighty 911 R. In fact, we should think of the two cars as non-identical twins. The only reason they’ve arrived three years apart is because development budgets wouldn’t cover both at the same time. Good: this engine maxed out at a measly 8,500rpm back in 2016, but Porsche has since extracted the full 9,000rpm from it. My god, the noise. All the better without a roof, I’ll bet… Well, it’s hardly shabby roof up, but flip down the Speedster’s fabric hood – a faffy manual job that involves manhandling the largest piece of carbon in the vast VW empire – and every one of those rpms will bounce off the nearest rockface before ricocheting into your ear. And directly to the nerves in your funny places.

    Hanging on for the full nine thousand goes against instinct, because, despite its lack of turbos, this is an obscenely torquey engine. Getting to 8,000rpm requires willpower but that final 9,000rpm just feels indecent, an act best not done in public for so many reasons.

    Find a stretch of road quick and empty enough to wring every last rev out, though, and it’s a high you’ll want to spend the rest of your life chasing. That final, wailing stretch to the redline is every bit as day-enriching and life-affirming as squirming through a load of Italian hairpins in a mid-engined Ferrari. It makes a good noise, I get it. But does it handle? The same suspension, four-wheel steering and carbon ceramic braking systems as the GT3 live beneath, with small tweaks to account for the Speedster’s slightly heftier weight and its different structure. So yep, it handles.

    Perhaps, driven back-to-back with its roofed relation, you’d find some slight sogginess. I sincerely doubt it, though. The instantaneous throttle response, the utterly transparent steering, the sheer alacrity of its turn in… the Speedster is a car completely free of slack, bristling with feedback and bombarding just about every one of your nerve endings relentlessly and tirelessly.

    The grip limits are so staggeringly high that you’d be foolish to ever slide this around on the road, but rarely has that mattered so little. It’s a thoroughly pleasant car to just potter in, changing gear for the hell of it, enjoying how muscular the engine is low down and playing tunes with the exhaust. But you’re missing out if you don’t extend its abilities as far as you dare. The fact Porsche has vehemently refused to offer PDK shows this really is a car for driving with intent, too.

    Electric steering gets no better than this. Changing gear gets no more satisfying than this. The Speedster feels like a slightly anachronistic step back in time after the tech-rich 992 (the interior suddenly feels old), but that’s probably why it’s so damn lovely. What makes its roof different to a 911 Cabrio’s? It’s slenderer, for starters, as is the windscreen. In the Cabrio you hold an electronic button for ten seconds or so and the whole thing folds away, fuss free. There are back seats, too. Here there’s only seating for two, and after electronically releasing the roof from the top of the screen, you then have to climb out, fold back the huge carbon-reinforced plastic rear deck (easy work, it’s spookily light), concertina the fabric roof into the space that’s opened up, then clunk the deck back down into place.

    It’s an involved experience and, of course, you have to be pulled over and at a standstill. No instant shelter from a sudden rain shower here. But it’s not physically demanding, and getting such an intimate look at the car’s lightweight manufacture is geekily gratifying. Without any of the Cabrio’s wind deflection kit things are much more blustery on the move, mind.

    Porsche thought about having no roof at all, for ultimate lightweighting. Some of its harder cored, 918 Spyder-owning customers actively discouraged them from adding one, in fact. But the presence of a proper roof structure (over a fiddly tonneau cover) surely means you’ll use this car, given it allows you to leave it parked up safely and use it comfortably in the wet. So how much is it? Um, £211,599. Which is nearly twice what its GT3 base car cost when new. Motorsport-developed 911s have a tendency to ascend in value pretty quickly, mind. The chunkiest option is the £15,302 Heritage Design pack which you can see on the silver car up top, but you can delete its decals. Silver, tan and gold detailing works far more sweetly than you might imagine and, without the slightly naff numbering, it’d be our choice.

    Even though the Speedster’s not track-focused, you can delete the climate control and stereo, and Porsche expects about 25 per cent of customers to do so, compared to just three per cent of GT3 drivers, who typically keep the air con to make trackdays less sweaty. Two hundred grand still sounds ludicrous.Then it’s worth telling you just how painfully complex the engineering behind the slightly lower windscreen is, with all manner of new tooling required to make it work. Likewise the new exhaust system; despite the addition of a particulate filter to keep it within emissions regulations, it’s actually 10kg lighter than before, thanks to exquisite new soldering.

    Porsche wouldn’t have gone to all that effort for fewer than 2,000 cars, we suspect, meaning this engine almost certainly lives on in future motorsport models. Far from being the 991-gen’s swansong, then, this Speedster offers us a glimpse of Porsche’s still naturally aspirated future, which should warm the cockles of every car enthusiast reading. Told you this was a feelgood car. 

    Overall rating: 9/10

     

    Link:  https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/porsche/2dr/first-drive-0

    Smiley


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Porsche 911 Speedster review: icing on the cake (Car magazine)

    ► The fifth double-bubble Porsche
    ► 1948 models being made
    ► A 991.2, not a 992

    Porsche’s fifth Speedster, and it’s fourth based on the 911 is a 70th birthday present to itself. More correctly, a present to 1948 customers, this celebration model in the best tradition of Porsche specials and being built in limited numbers. It’s a bit late, because Porsche’s engineers - like the rest of the industry - have been a bit preoccupied with emissions recently.

    Urm, it’s a 991, right?

    We’re familiar now with the 992, but this Speedster is a last hurrah for the old 991. It’s been rumoured for years, GT Director Andreas Preuninger admitting on the launch it was shown to a select few customers alongside the then still secret 911 R. That was back in 2014. It’s that car’s open relation, really, sharing a lot with the even more limited-series 911, which Porsche built just 991 examples of. 

    Yup, that's a 991.2, not a new 992

    Tell us more…

    Time’s moved on since that R, so while the Speedster borrows elements from it - carbon fibre front wings and bonnet, its six-speed manual transmission and suspension from the GT3 - it’s had to evolve for the environment it now finds itself in. Specifically relating to its engine, the GT department having found a way to get its incredible, high-revving naturally-aspirated 4.0-litre flat-six through the latest emissions and noise regulations. 

    So it’s not turbocharged?

    Absolutely not, and while nobody’s saying so officially, this is essentially the engine that’ll power the forthcoming 992-based GT3. There’s new individual throttles a higher pressure injection system and an exhaust that uses a clever bonding technique and thinner metals to allow it to weigh in at 10kg less than the GT3’s exhaust. They’ve managed that despite the addition of a pair of mandatory particulate filters. That’s engineering alchemy, the GT department not stopping there, upping the power at the same time to 510hp. 

    The new 991.2 Speedster cuts a unique profile from the side

    And still as intense?

    More so, yes there’s a change in the note from that new exhaust, it more cultured, less rough and ready and having a metallic shriek as it chases its 9,000rpm maximum, that’s, dare we say it, a bit Italian in its tone. It’s better heard, too, with the simple rood dropped and stowed under the massive carbonfibre cover which, in conjunction with the typical dropped and slightly raked Speedster screen, gives the 911 a more lithe look than ever before. 

    It doesn’t just look different outside, but it feels it inside. Snugly situated in the bucket seats, that windscreen, the sky above and the proximity of the rear clamshell over your shoulder changes how it feels in there. It feels a bit more purposeful, more focussed, but familiar at the same time, which, given the 991’s been around so long isn’t surprising. It’s pleasingly so, the simple instrumentation, the lack of digital screens - particularly if you opt for no PCM and climate control to save weight - make it all feel a bit old-school. 

    Deletion-spec keeps it old school

    But fast? 

    Oh, hell, yes. More crucially the Speedster feelsquick, even if Preuninger admits it’s not all about laptimes. It’s more about driving, and here it delivers, with mesmerising cross-country pace. The manual transmission is as precise and quick as they come, being an absolute joy to use. 

    You can heel-and-toe yourself, but press the Auto Blip button and it’ll rev match better than you can. The brakes, standard PCCB, are as effective as ever, but it’s the sheer joy of the feel and feedback that make the Speedster stand out, even from the 911 R. 

    The steering is utterly uncorrupted by it being roofless, the suspension providing superb body and wheel control, riding well even on rougher surfaces on the Sardinian launch route. The sun out helped, obviously, but the Speedster is an engaging, visceral hit that’s arguably as appealing, if not more so than any GT product before it. Yes, we just said that. 

    There are shades of Carrera GT in its intensity, indeed, you’d need a wheelman of Rohrl’s skills to keep up with a well-driven Speedster. If you like driving, you’ll love the Speedster. 

    The 991.2 Speedster verdict by CAR magazine

    Verdict: right, I want one…

    You can’t have one, because they’ll all have been snapped up. If we could have one (and we’d love one) we’d do without the Heritage Design pack, or at least do without the ‘spears’ and painted front bumper and numbers, as it’s all a little bit overt. At £15,302 it’s not cheap, either, though the gold Speedster badges and cognac and black interior is cool.

    If you’ve got an allocation you’ll not care, and you’ll also be aware of the £211,599 price tag. Birthday presents are meant to be indulgent though, and with the Speedster Porsche has really delivered.

    Link:  https://www.carmagazine.co.uk/car-reviews/porsche/911-speedster/

    Smiley


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Porsche 911 Speedster 2019 review (Autocar)

    Porsche's fabled GT-car division turns out the 991-generation lights in spectacular fashion

    (14 May 2019)

    What is it?

    Strange that 65 years have passed since the name first appeared, and yet Porsche is still to fix what exactly a ‘Speedster’ should be.

    The lightweight 1954 original was based on the 69bhp four-cylinder 356 - 1500 and became a relatively affordable purists’ fantasy for the American market – with, of course, the removable windscreen. Drive one today and I guarantee you’ll fall for it instantly. And not only because it operates with the mechanical precision of something far more modern, but also because you just get its whole vibe straight away: pureness.

    Later versions sprouted heavyweight price tags but did little to trim kerb weight and upped the Speedster’s luxury quotient. Among them was a Carrera Cabriolet-based car that borrowed nothing more than interior dressings from the hardcore 964 RS and a modified Carrera GTS built to promote Porsche’s ‘Exclusive’ customisation business. The famous silhouette remained, but there was no common philosophy.

    But hold the phone. This sixth iteration of the concept finally offers some continuity, even if you do need to go right back to the Speedster’s road-racing roots to join the dots.

    And what dots. This is the first time Porsche’s fabled GT division has had a crack at the recipe – ‘no frippery’ is the unofficial motto – and as such a 991.2 911 GT3 dwells beneath the Speedster’s largely carbonfibre new bodywork. We are, in short, firmly back in road-racing territory, 356 Speedster style. 

    The conception is as follows. The rear body-in-white of a Carrera 4S Cabriolet is grafted to the front of a GT3. The carbonfibre wings and bonnet then come courtesy of the 911 R and the rear apron from the GT3 Touring, but the huge carbonfibre rear deck and classic stooped windshield are all new. Figuring out how to fit that last bit cost rather a lot of money, in fact. Millions, apparently.

    Under the bodywork, the GT3’s inverted dampers are softened a touch (spring rates are unchanged), and the four-wheel steering is retuned to compensate for the high-speed stability lost when you shear Porsche’s trackday tool of its enormous rear wing, but overall the mechanical package is practically identical. To underscore the intent, there’s also but a single gearbox offered: a six-speed manual. 

    And yet perhaps the biggest news is the engine, which is a development of the naturally aspirated 4.0-litre flat six that has become a hallmark of the GT3 experience. New particulate filters have diluted the manic engine note – bluntly, it’s now a little less ‘motorsport’, if still utterly magnificent – but fuel injectors operating at higher pressure have helped raise power from 493bhp to 503bhp and there are new individual throttle bodies for response that, Porsche claims, borders on the genuinely rabid.

    It is a cleaner, cleverer engine, and Porsche has also kept the stratospheric 9000rpm red line intact. So, without further ado…

    What's it like?

    As befits the name, sliding into the Speedster is a journey back in time. The 360mm steering wheel is devoid of switchgear – it changes the car’s course, simple as. Compared with the one in the new, 992-generation 911, the central tacho feels old-school Porsche with its italicised 'Speedster' script and runs to double digits. Peer into the footwell and there are three functional-looking pedals, and the gearlever is conspicuously short. The seats are those found in the 918 Spyder and are, as ever, so embracing that you’ll never want to get out.     

    But if the weather’s good, you’ll also want to get the roof off, and that means you'll have to get out. Porsche very nearly scrapped the idea of having any roof at all (as per the original concept car built way back in 2014), which would have allowed the decking between the ‘streamliner’ buttresses to sit even lower, but it eventually erred on the side of usability. But even with the need to store a roof, this is a dashing car in the metal – far more so than in the photos, somehow – with the hunkered-down tail seemingly a lot less Quasimodo than previous Speedster iterations.

    Unlike the electric folding setup in the 997 Speedster, you do it by hand in the 991 Speedster – a process that takes all of about 20 seconds, because the roof weighs only 10kg. Accessing the roof itself is simple enough and involves unclipping the rear deck, which pivots up and backwards as you lightly pull on it. Admittedly, having to pull over if it starts to rain is a little inconvenient, but somehow the manual process brings you to closer to the Speedster and is more in line with its ethos – and integrity.  

    And those things are important. This a dream project for Andreas Preuninger, who, as a young man, developed an infatuation with the 1987 G-Series Speedster. Later on in his life, while helping to establish Porsche’s GT division as the engineering dynamo it is today, he even went as far as to draft Speedsters based on the 996 and 997 911s, neither of which saw the light of day. It's another strand that joins the oldest Speedster with this latest one, because somehow you can't imagine the individuals involved poured quite so much love into the interim Speedsters.

    Given the ingredients, it doesn't take a genuis to work out that the Speedster must be mind-blowing on the road – and it is. Performance? More than you’ll ever need. The almost-instant, pulverising acceleration of the current class of 600bhp-plus turbocharged supercars is absent, but the linearity of the power delivery and the throttle response – which is now so sharp that it demands genuine sensitivity while balancing the car through corners – compensate. Porsche's claimed 503bhp feels conservative in any case.   

    And the rigidity lost along with the fixed roof? It simply isn't an issue. Back to back with a GT3, you might notice the slight deficit, but on the road the Speedster tracks beautifully true, grips hard on its trackday-spec Michelin Cup 2 tyres and generally generates the kind of poise that makes you wonder whether it is the engine rather than the roof mechanism that sits less than a foot behind your left ear. Perhaps the four-wheel steering intervention is now a little too detectable through slower direction changes, where the Speedster can seem a little more nervous than the GT3, but that's such a minor qualm. Mostly it's just gloriously intuitive, with pin-sharp reflexes.

    This car is riotous fun, in truth, not least because you’re aware the Speedster is more than simply a serious and profoundly capable performance car: it’s a flight of fancy, epic in its own right.        

    And so it should surprise no one that there are some compromises. This writer would prefer the better all-round visibility of a fixed-top GT3 and, with less wind noise, the more trance-like focus of the cabin ambience, too. This isn’t to say you couldn’t comfortably drive the Speedster all day in reasonable comfort – incredibly for something so theatrical, you could – but the raised rear bulkhead looms in your peripheral vision and makes the interior feel smaller than it actually is.

    Should I buy one?

    A planned production run of 1948 examples is a bit healthy for a limited-edition Porsche, but even so, each Speedster will cost £211,599, rising to around £226,000 if you option the Heritage Design Pack.

    Ah yes, the Heritage Design Pack, which costs £15,300. I’d leave the 1950s-inspired decals well alone but take the tan leather bucket seats, gold details and various historic Porsche crests. Value for money? Absolutely not, but with GT Silver paint, the overall effect is pretty marvellous. 

    Were it still possible to buy a basic GT3 for roughly £100,000 less, at this point you might question the value of the Speedster. But you can’t buy a basic GT3, and in any case, the car that forms the basis for the Speedster was always heroically good value next to the opposition.

    This latest ware is every bit as spectacular to drive as it is to look at, too, and depreciation? Please. No new car is entirely immune to the risk of depreciation, but a limited-edition GT Porsche is as close as it gets.   

    Were it our money, we wouldn’t hesitate, because finally Porsche knows exactly what its hip-high Speedster needs to be, and the result is breathtaking.

    Porsche 911 Speedster specification

    Where Sardinia Price £211,599 On sale Now Engine 6 cyls horizontally opposed, 3996cc, petrol Power 503bhp at 9000rpm Torque 346lb ft at 6250rpm Gearbox 6-spd manual Kerb weight 1465kg Top speed 192mph 0-62mph 4.0sec Fuel economy 20.6mpg CO2, tax band 317g/km, 37%

    Link:  https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/porsche/911-speedster/first-drives/porsche-911-speedster-2019-review

    Smiley


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Porsche 911 Speedster: Driven (PistonHeads)

    Curious cocktail, the Speedster. This is the second time Porsche has used its catchiest nameplate to round out a 911 generation; the first being last time around with the 997 variant. That model, a hulking cabriolet with a GTS engine, wasn't particularly great, truth be told. This one though, verifiably the last gasp of the dearly departed 991, and with a GT3 engine and chassis to boot, arrives with greatness virtually plumbed in.

    Who, after all, wouldn't relish the prospect of an open-air cabin when one of the world's last remaining - and truly sensational - naturally-aspirated engines can be found trilling away over your left shoulder? Porsche knows you would. Porsche knows, in fact, that you might feasibly give your right arm for such a thing. Thus it has conspired to charge an arm-sized sum: this Speedster is £211,599 - essentially £100k more than the 991 GT3 was at launch.

    It is such an outrageous amount to pay for an open-top 911 that its maker has not spared the special sauce. For a start, this is the first Speedster to be developed by Porsche Motorsport, the division responsible for every GT-badged variant of the firm's flagship sports car. Then there's the revelation that the manufacturer has been playing around with the concept since 2013 (just two years after the 991's launch, incredibly) and originally conceived the run-out model with no roof at all. That would likely have satisfied the buyers on America's West Coast - historically the place where most of it buyers live - but would obviously have limited usability anywhere with, you know, weather.

    Consequently, there is a roof, a fabric one that you'll mostly be putting up and down yourself. Happily it's an easy-peasy, 45-second-ish job and gives you ample opportunity to eyeball the enormous slab of composite its maker has deployed as a weight-saving solution to the double-bubble rear deck requirement. You'll find no bigger single-piece of carbon fibre on any other road-going Porsche, and its fitment is indicative of the effort applied across the board.

    Re-engineering the 991 with those shortened A pillars was apparently no mean feat. Ditto the job of fusing a GT3 underbody with what is essentially the back end of a cabriolet. To minimise weight gain over the conventional GT3, carbon fibre features heavily elsewhere in the body, including the front wings and bonnet. Then there's the imperious 4.0-litre flat-six, outfitted with a new lightweight exhaust system so that the engineers might have somewhere to put a brace of Euro 6-qualifying particulate filters.

    The result, to look at, duly lives up to its Speedster heritage. Granted, the characteristic styling cues aren't for everyone, and there are still some angles where you might conceivably question the visual pay-off of that outsized rear-end. But it looks great from everywhere else (yep, that's a new front splitter) and, frankly, if you're anything like us, there will be too much excited fumbling at the door handle to pay the exterior too much mind.

    Inside, it's all high-spec 991 - which will be mildly discombobulating if you've driven the 992 because its successor does such a good job of tidying up all the extraneous switchgear. Still, it's wonderfully well finished, you get analogue dials (which are better, no question) and the drive modes remain pleasingly limited to two-stage dampers, a two-stage exhaust note and a two-stage deactivation of the ESC and traction control.

    For the Speedster, Porsche has also given you the choice of turning the gearbox's auto blip on and off separately, too. The six-speed manual itself though feels as it did before: brawny, mechanical, accurate and very positive. The thickset clutch pedal follows suit. Bring it up too gingerly or put the throttle down too hesitantly and the transmission won't spare your blushes. This, encouragingly, is not a car for pussyfooting about in.

    At mediocre speeds, it rather does what it says on the tin, and trundles around the place like a GT3 with the roof removed. Which is, of course, startlingly high praise. Structurally speaking, at least half the Speedster is a convertible, which, by definition, makes it slightly heavier and wobblier than the 991.2 GT3. But don't expect to notice either demerit on the road, much less waste time decrying them. Whatever Porsche did to marry the open-top architecture to the GT-grade chassis has worked splendidly: there's no tremor or sense of disconnect or squidgy lack of edge to the Speedster - or if there is it can be rated as no more significant than the 0.2 seconds the model has sacrificed in the sprint to 62mph. Which is to say not at all.

    In the bad old days the addition of fuel particulate filters might have meant a gentle sullying of the engine's high-revving pyrotechnics - but Porsche's engineers have proven themselves more than equal to the task: the latest 4.0-litre unit has had its fuel pressure increased to 250bar courtesy of new injectors and a modified intake system now features individual throttle valves. The result is 510hp at 8,400rpm - marginally more than was delivered in the outgoing GT3.

    Its maker says you get better throttle response as part of the bargain, although that's difficult to measure in any objective way. Subjectively, the Speedster goes phenomenally well. There is the very real possibility that no comparable engine on sale today forges such a quintessential relationship between throttle and trainer sole. It doesn't surge or erupt or seek to overwhelm; it goes quickly, then very quickly, then, in its final throes, it slays you dead.

    The difference between stationary and dead is as nuanced as a Robert Frost poem. Measuring very precisely how many of the motor's rasping revolutions you want at any given moment - and from what gear - is scandalously rewarding. Much time is spent plotting a way back to the euphoric 1,500rpm adjacent to the redline, and yet, thanks to the interactiveness of that third pedal, Porsche's finest engine is no less compelling 3,000rpm earlier.

    The driveline would be nothing though - or half as good, at least - without the magicked up contribution of the chassis underpinning it. Unweighted and tenacious at the front, laser-guided by soft-edged, silly-good steering and cheerily beholden to its steerable back axle, the Speedster takes its GT3 impression deadly seriously. Porsche has apparently set it up to be slightly more benign at high speeds to account for the degradation in aerodynamic performance - but, on any road governed by speed limits, it still flatters you with its approachability and swaggering, tactile sense of beyond-limit control.

    Because it does all these things, and in the same moment indulges you with the soft swirl of a summer's breeze, it must be considered a triumph on its own terms. It is easily good enough to have you wondering at journey's end if any other car separated from its roof holds a candle to its virtuosic marshalling of ride and handling and speed and sound. The Ferrari 488 Spider, perhaps. Or the McLaren 600LT. The Speedster can count itself in the same cathedral, certainly.

    Does that make it worthy of its £100k premium versus an original 991 GT3? Well, on the face of it, and with used values still sky high, there's little doubt that Porsche is on remarkably solid ground charging beyond £200k for a limited edition, run-out 911. It will sell all 1948 examples immediately, and some will be resold for much more.

    But, for us, a six-figure markup also requires a commensurate step up in ability or driving experience - and for all its absurd loveliness and implied desirability, it could be argued that the Speedster doesn't advance the stock GT3's own sky-high charm sufficiently far down the road. When Porsche worked a similar trick with the 981, the much venerated Spyder came with the kicker of a larger - and consummately better - 3.8-litre flat-six, instantly redefining just how amazing the already very good Boxster could be.

    The latest Speedster doesn't quite manage that. Its defining achievement is making a convertible 911 very nearly as spectacular to drive as a manual 991.2 GT3. Which is good enough for it to be among the best open-top sports cars in the world, without it being the best 991 ever made.

    Still, if the colossal asking price helped justify the (all but confirmed) extension of the 4.0-litre flat-six's lifespan, cult status beckons. It would befit the wonderful car Porsche has built.

    SPECIFICATION - PORSCHE 911 SPEEDSTER (991)
    Engine:
     3,996cc flat-6
    Transmission: six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
    Power (hp): 510@8,400rpm
    Torque (lb ft): 346@6,250rpm
    0-62mph: 4.0sec
    Top speed: 192mph
    Weight: 1,465kg (DIN)
    MPG: TBC
    CO2: 317g/km
    Price: £211,599

    Link:  https://www.pistonheads.com/news/ph-driven/porsche-911-speedster-driven/40191

    Smiley


    Re: 991 Speedster

    Ferdie:
    Kobalt:

    Amazing!

     

    Thanks, was worth the wait. 😀

    pretty impressive !


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: 991 Speedster

    New Porsche 911 Speedster 2019 review (Auto Express)

    (14 May 2019)

    New Porsche 911 Speedster is a fabulous last hurrah for the 991-generation 911

    Verdict: 5 stars

    This last-of-the-line 991-generation Porsche 911 Speedster is one of the best, blending the sensational performance of the outgoing GT3 with a chassis that’s brilliantly in tune with the road. Very few experiences compare with driving a naturally aspirated car that has such a sweet manual gearbox – a set-up that’s becoming rarer by the day. With this latest Speedster, not only has Porsche created a great 911, it’s also managed to produce one of the finest sports cars of a generation.

    There are a few things you need to know about the new Porsche 911 Speedster. Number one is that it’s not a brand-new 911 like the 992 we drove earlier this year; instead, it’s the last of the 991-generation of 911s. Number two, only 1,948 examples will be produced, marking the year the first Porsche – the Roadster Nr1 – was built. Three, they are all sold out. Sorry.

    But if you’re lucky enough to have put down a deposit, we’ve no doubt you’ll enjoy it. This last hurrah for all things 991 is a gem of a sign-off, primarily because it has been created by the company’s GT department. No disrespect to those who slave away developing Carreras, Boxsters, Caymans and the like, but the GT cars have always been that little bit more special. And the Speedster is no different.

    Conceived in 2013 as an internal project to investigate what an open-top 911 GT3 could look like, the Speedster was soon earmarked as the car Porsche would launch to celebrate its 70th anniversary in 2017.

    This sixth-generation Speedster (the fifth based on the 911) is produced from two 911s: the last 991 GT3 and the same era of Carrera Cabriolet. The former donates its front end, the latter its tail. That means the body loses about 20 per cent of its rigidity compared with a GT3 coupé, but it’s still a fair chunk stiffer than a Carrera Cabrio. It’s also lighter, thanks to the use of carbon fibre on the bonnet, wings and engine.

    The roof, like another core component of the car that we’ll get to in a moment, requires some manual intervention. You can’t just press a button and wait. Instead, you have to flick a switch in the centre console, get out of the car and lift the 10kg rear deck out of the way, then manually fold the roof into the opening provided before closing the deck. It’s not as fiddly as a Boxster Spyder’s roof, but some precious open-top driving enthusiasts may grumble.

    After experiencing the latest 992-generation 911, it feels a little strange to be in a ‘new’ 911 surrounded by old fixtures and fittings. The lack of screens is a stark reminder of how quickly cars evolve. There’s not even an infotainment system in the Speedster – only an open cubbyhole with two shelves (you also get a storage area behind both seats where the rear seats would have been). But that really doesn’t matter, because there is a manual gearbox and a 4.0-litre naturally aspirated flat-six engine to entertain you. That’s the same unit as in a 911 Carrera Cup race car.

    A new injection system and throttle valve set-up have liberated an extra 10bhp, lifting power to 503bhp. The new exhaust is 10kg lighter, despite the fitment of particulate filters, and unlike in the GT3, there’s a dual-mass flywheel, too, which removes the chunter and clatter at tickover.

    In those first few moments you notice three key things. The lower windscreen doesn’t hamper forward vision one bit. Imperfections in the road don’t generate a single degree of flex through the body, either. Oh, and driving a car with a manual box and a naturally aspirated engine is still near-impossible to beat.

    Over those first few miles, your senses suggest the Speedster’s six speeds are very short, so frequently are you changing gear, but the tacho tells you otherwise.

    The engine comes on song at just above 3,000rpm, and by 6,000rpm your instincts tell you it’s time to change up, so you do.

    Then you realise your mistake, because things are only getting going. This engine revs to nearly 9,000rpm, forcing you to hold the gear and enjoy the moment of a pure race-bred engine catapulting you on a journey of engineering brilliance. It’s addictive, and with the roof down you can revel in that pure-911 soundtrack, too.

    Combined with its sublime gearshift and direct steering that matches speed with precision, the chassis – lifted wholesale from the GT3 – is more supple, allowing you to enjoy more of its talents on the road at very little cost to outright performance.

    In the Speedster, you have one of the finest open-top Porsches since the Carrera GT – and yet another legend in the making.

    Key specs:

    • Model: Porsche 911 Speedster
    • Price: £211,599
    • Engine: 4.0-litre 6cyl petrol
    • Power/torque: 503bhp/470Nm
    • Transmission: Six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
    • 0-62mph: 4.0 seconds
    • Top speed: 192mph
    • Economy/CO2: 20.6mpg/317g/km
    • On sale: Sold out

    Link:  https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/porsche/911/106822/new-porsche-911-speedster-2019-review

    Smiley


    Re: 991 Speedster

    I find it hard to distinguish automotive journalism from advertising.


    --

    "Don't worry about avoiding temptation, as you grow older it will avoid you"  Churchill


    Re: 991 Speedster

    I just watched at video at lunch time and this car looks muted, shocking angry


    --

    GT Lover, Porsche fan

    991.2 GT3 manual, 991 GT3 2014(sold)

    Cayenne GTS 2014


     
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