Crown

Forum - Thread


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0


     

     

    2011-Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_AMS-article-link

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    I like the white one more...
    --

    There is no try. Just do.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 road and track test...

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Porsche GT3 RS 4.0 at Silverstone...

    Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_AutoExpress-video-link

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    I love this car, both in white and black, but first order of business would be to remove the decals! I really can't understand why Porsche would blemish such an important car like this. That center stripe, what were they thinking? At least they are only stickers and not paint! Smiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Thanks for your effort Boxster Coupe GTS!

    @trip: Same here! Is it my imagination or does the 4.0 wing have different end plates on the wing than the 3.8 RS?


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Porker I believe the end plates are larger on the 4.0.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Having a black one of these would be a dream come true

    What are the chances of the 991 GT3 being nearly as good as this? 


    --


    RT Moderator 
    - 997.1 C2S GT Silver/Cocoa, -20mm sports suspension/LSD, PSE, short shifter, SportDesign rims, Zuffenhausen collection


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    The car in black is just so....SEXY! 1308203569147poledancin.gif


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    trip:

    Porker I believe the end plates are larger on the 4.0.

     

    from RC´s PDF:

    "...in combination with a slightly steeper wing position of the rear wing and modified side plates...."

    BlueflameSmiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Pentium:
    I like the white one more...

     +1 Smiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    trip:

    ........but first order of business would be to remove the decals! I really can't understand why Porsche would blemish such an important car like this. ......Smiley

    Totally agree, all the decals and strips are so "boy racer"....I never liked them in the 60's and 70's either!


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

     I had a discussion on another forum about the GT3 RS and their history. This is what I wrote. I am only posting this , because it may give us an insight on why Porsche always puts decals on their RS models.

    There have been RS models since 1972. The car was first made as a homologation special so that Porsche could compete in the FiA group 4 World Championships.
    There was such a demand for the RS models, that it continued through the 964RS, 933RS and finally in 2003 the modern era 996 GT3 RS. The 996RS was the brainchild of Andreas Preuninger and gave birth to to a line of ultra focused sport cars. He mocked a sketch using 70's styling on top of a 996 diagram. This was presented to the design studio , who subsequently bought it and decided that the car needed to be produced. Thus the GT3 RS was born.
    In 2007 we saw the introduction of the 997 GT3 RS Generation I and the current 997 GT3 RS is Generation II.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 road and track test...

    (16 June 2011)

    "Sensationally fast on road and track, Porsche's GT3 RS 4.0 is one of the most exciting cars, well, ever..."

    So, this really is it for the current, 997-generation of Porsche 911. Impossibly wide, hunkered down to the ground and looking every inch like a full-blown racer, the 4.0-litre version of the already hardcore GT3 RS is about as extreme a road car as you're likely to find.

    Standing alongside it at Silverstone today - and, it has to be said, looking as pleased as punch - is Andreas Preuninger, who heads up Porsche's GT car programme and has played a role in every version of GT3 since the first one was launched in 1999. "Before we came along, 'GT3' was just the name of a class in racing. Now, if you search just for GT3 on Google it comes up with Porsche as third on the list - now it is associated with us," he beams.

    The GT3 RS 4.0 follows on from the basic 997-generation 3.8-litre GT3 and GT3 RS road cars, throwing in some bits of the turbocharged GT2 RS road car and RSR race car for good measure. It's also the eighth and final GT3 that will use the M97 "Metzger" engine, which will make way for a direct injection unit for the next generation of 911 GT3.

    And be in no doubt that this car is all about the engine. With no room to increase the bore (already at its limit at 102.4mm), Preuninger and his team instead worked on the stroke, which has gone from 76.4mm to 80.4mm. "To increase the stroke is not good for a high revving car usually," he says. "But this one was better because we changed a lot of other things. There are different rods and heads and we've lowered the compression ratio meaning you can use a more aggressive ignition curve."

    A naturally-aspirated unit with 493bhp at 8,250rpm and 399lb ft of torque at 5,750rpm are the results of the fettling, which also includes swapping the GT3's standard crankshaft for the item from Porsche's RSR racer. Compared with a "standard" RS, those are gains of 50bhp and 22lb ft of torque, enough to knock a tenth off the car's 0-62mph acceleration time (now 3.9 seconds) and add 1mph to the top speed (193mph). That last figure might not seem particularly impressive given the extra grunt on tap, but that's because the 4.0 has more downforce than a regular RS. Much more.

    "The 3.8 isn't a tractor engine," says Preuninger. "It's been maxed out for 10 years. Top speed is not important, it's about acceleration. This car has a nine-degree angle on the rear spoiler, whereas it's six degrees on the 3.8, so we have 195kg of downforce at top speed. Then we've put flics on the front bumper to balance out the extra rear downforce." He points to the small aerodynamic additions in the corners of the front bumper. Do they work? "In the Fuchsröhre at the Nürburgring with the flics on you can take it flat. Without them, you can't."

    The result of such differences is that the RS 4.0 is six seconds faster around the Nordschleife than the RS 3.8, not to mention five seconds quicker than the Carrera GT supercar, with a lap time of 7min 27.

    The attention to detail exercised to gain that extra power is matched by the focus placed on the 4.0's suspension, which gets a rose-jointed rear setup from the GT2 RS, as well as helper springs to reduce unsprung weight. Lightweight plastics (for the side windows and rear screen), plus carbon-fibre abound, while inside the changes include carpets that are half the thickness of a normal 911's. As a result of all the tinkering the RS 4.0's kerb weight is 1,360kg, a further 10-kilo reduction on the 3.8-litre RS.

    Clearly this is a very special car, with just 600 being built and all already sold despite the £128,466 price tag being nearly double that of a basic 911. The question is, does the driving experience live up to the exotic specification?

    In a word: yes. There was little doubt that the RS would be sensational around Silverstone, but just how ferociously it accelerates and just how stable it feels through corners is bordering on surreal. Miss an apex or brake too late and never do you get the sense that the RS might bite. Indeed, so composed is the chassis and so communicative are the major controls (this really is one of the best steering systems around) that you'll rarely see the traction or stability lights flashing, no matter how ham-fisted your driving.

    It is the engine that steals the show, however. The first time you hit the reserves of mid-range torque your initial thought is that you must be a gear lower than you actually are. It's a clue that what you really need to do is approach every corner a gear higher than you're used to, and let the torque do the work.

    Pick-up from 2,000rpm is strong and by 3,000rpm you're bordering on the mid-range shove offered by a 911 Turbo. That it then pulls hard all the way through to 8,500rpm shows that the work Preuninger and his team have done to maintain the flat-six's character has been a complete success. So fast is the RS 4.0 that it feels like it smashes through the 10mph increments between 130-160mph as easily as it does from 30-60mph. It really is epic.

    What's always surprised about RS 911s is that the excellence they demonstrate on track doesn't translate to a car that's impossible to drive on the road. Get used to the heavy clutch and weighty, short throw of the six-speed gearbox and guiding the RS 4.0 through town traffic is no more intimidating than any other 911. And the ride quality, while firm, is certainly not unbearable, even on typical British B roads. In truth, if you can make do with noise (and there is quite a lot of it from the engine and tyres) it's almost as satisfying to drive on the road as it is on track.

    So, despite its serious track car credentials, the GT3 RS 4.0 is no one-trick pony. Rather, it's a first class road and track car, not to mention a fine investment for the lucky 600 who had their names down for one.

    The best car of 2011 so far? It might just be...

    THE FACTS

    Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

    Tested: 3,996cc naturally aspirated flat-six engine, six-speed manual transmission, rear-wheel drive
    Price / on sale: £128,466 / sold out
    Power/torque: 493bhp @ 8,250rpm / 339lb ft @ 5,750rpm
    Top speed: 193mph
    Acceleration: 0-62mph in 3.9sec
    Fuel economy: 20.1mpg (EU Combined)
    CO2 emissions: 326g/km
    VED band: M (£1,000 first year, £460 thereafter)
    Verdict: Sensational. Costs nearly twice as much as an entry-level 911 and worth every penny
    Telegraph rating: 5/5 stars

    ...in glorious High Definition! 

    Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_Telegraph-review

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    A GT3 Cup Experience review, nice read!

    http://www.autoblog.com/2011/06/17/2011-porsche-911-gt3-cup-first-drive-review/


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Porker:

    A GT3 Cup Experience review, nice read!

    http://www.autoblog.com/2011/06/17/2011-porsche-911-gt3-cup-first-drive-review/

     Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    GT3 RS 4.0 in black...

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 First Drive...

    If You Thought the Standard 911 GT3 RS Couldn't Get Any Better, You Were Wrong...

    (by Andrew Frankel, 6 June 2011)

    About ten minutes into my first drive of the new 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0, I had an epiphany.

    Until then I'd been utterly seduced by its new 4.0-liter, 500-horsepower flat six. I was screaming around Silverstone at 8,500 rpm, electronics off, tail out, game on. It was brilliant fun — in every regard the visceral, soul-enhancing, tire-destroying orgy of excess I'd planned on having. After all, this is the final GT3 in a series stretching back to the last century.

    It was only when I eased back for the final lap that it dawned on me: I was driving it the wrong way.

    And the Right Way? 

    If you want to understand what the new four-liter engine does for Porsche's greatest road car, forget the headline power figure. It's impressive, it shaves a tenth from the zero-to-sixty time, but it's not what this car is about.

    Instead, the new GT3 RS is all about torque. In previous GT3s, the only major problem was their combination of peaky engines with wide gear ratios. In isolation either is fine but together they add up to a car that has to be driven like your pants are on fire to get the most from it. Which is why I was driving the way I was.

    To make this engine, Porsche extended its stroke by installing the crank from the RSR race car (the bores were already maxed out), a move that finally provided the GT3 with the only tool it was missing. On paper, the extra 22 pound-feet of torque doesn't look like much, but that's only the peak number. When you overlay old and new torque curves you see not a thin ribbon separating the two lines, but something closer to an Interstate.

    More Than Just a Bigger Engine

    But before we examine the effect this has on the GT3's already well documented abilities, it's worth bearing in mind that while the badge only says "RS 4.0" (it's the first GT3 not to carry the name), in reality there's far more here than just an extra 196ccs of displacement.

    Normally, when you stroke an engine you expect to gain flexibility at the expense of top-end bite. Porsche took it a step further by adding higher flow air filters and a new intake manifold along with freer flowing catalysts with 300 instead of 400 cells. The extra breathing capacity boosts the engine's output from 117 hp per liter to 125 hp per liter. Then the engineers drove it 2,000 miles at maximum engine speed just to see if it was as durable as Porsche's other motors. It was.

    "It's a car capable of making even the 3.8 GT3 RS look compromised..."

    To make sure the rest of the car does not shrink into the shadows of that engine, many components have been taken from the sledgehammer (and $60,000 more expensive) GT2 RS, including its carbon-fiber hood and front fender, rose-jointed lower arms in the rear suspension and even its lightweight carpets. The overall result is a 22-pound weight reduction that gets the RS 4.0 just under the 3,000-pound mark. Like the GT2 RS the rear springs also carry tiny helper springs to keep the coils pre-loaded but the springs themselves are unique to the 4.0 RS front and rear.

    And then there's the aero package. Not content with the massive downforce achieved on the 3.8 RS (greater even than the GT2 RS), Porsche added an all-new rear wing with a 9-degree angle of attack. It actually created so much downforce that it destabilized the front. Balance was restored by adding the tiny winglets you see to the front and side. They might look like cosmetic afterthoughts but Porsche Motorsport guru Andreas Preuninger assured me, "at the Pflanzgarten at the Nürburgring Nordschleife, with the wings you go flat. Without, you go off." He did not look like he was kidding.

    Not Just Faster, Easier

    So, I took this knowledge and tried to apply it to driving the car. And the feeling is of a car not merely considerably quicker, but so much simpler to drive. By the end of my session I was a gear up through every corner, because now the car has the mid-range drive to haul you away from the apex. And lower revs plus higher gears means less torture for the tires while still providing enough pure grunt to challenge the traction of this track-tuned 911 on bubblegum sticky road racing rubber.

    So, now you're working less at the shifter and less at the wheel too, providing more of the most precious commodity of all when driving a car as fast as you can: thinking time. You can concentrate instead on positioning the car to perfection, extracting every inch of potential from the car, the track and yourself. From the outside it looks far less dramatic, but from behind the wheel the sense is of discovering another dimension of ability. The single most impressive aspect of this landmark machine is not just that it offers far greater rewards than the 3.8 RS, it's that it does so while actually asking less of you as a driver.

    The Last One for Sure

    Having spent the last dozen years driving GT3s, it seems almost unbelievable that this is the last 911 based on the original 996/997 platform. And it appears as nothing less than a tragedy that its motorsports engine which can trace its roots right back to the 1980s and has won races right around the planet including Le Mans, will die with it.

    Now is not the time to be talking about the next GT3, not least because it is at least two years away. Let us instead focus on the way Porsche has chosen to say goodbye to the old. As far as I'm concerned, the 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 is the finest road car to wear the shield of Stuttgart on its nose. A car capable of making even the 3.8 GT3 RS look compromised and the GT2 RS overblown and unnecessary. It is hard indeed to think of a finer way of signing off than this...

    Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_Inside-Line

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0...

    • Track-focused 4.0-litre 911 driven
    • Limited to just 600 cars worldwide
    • Price from £128,466

    (17 June 2011)

    What is it?

    This is the GT3 RS 4.0, a more powerful version of the stripped-out (and discontinued) GT3 RS, and the last hurrah for the current-shape 911 before its replacement is unveiled in the autumn.

    Just 600 examples of the GT3 RS 4.0 will be built, and these trade the ‘standard’ GT3 RS’s 3.8-litre flat-six for a 4.0-litre that’s related to the engine in Porsche’s GT3 RSR racing car.

    Maximum power is 493bhp at 8250rpm, compared with the 3.8’s 444bhp at 7900rpm, while peak torque climbs from 317lb ft at 6750rpm to 339lb ft at 5750rpm.

    As well as the new engine, the GT3 RS 4.0 benefits from racing car-derived suspension and aerodynamic tweaks that improve downforce.

    What’s more, the bonnet, front wings and seat frames are all made from carbonfibre to help knock 10kg off the GT3 RS’s already feather-light kerb weight.

    What's it like to drive?

    The GT3 RS 4.0 will blast you from 0-62mph in 3.9 seconds, which is just 0.1 seconds faster than the 3.8. However, the new car is a lot more flexible thanks to its extra low-down torque.

    If you’re feeling lazy, you can leave it in fourth gear, because it will happily pull from next-to-no revs. It starts to feel incredibly strong in the mid-range, before piling on speed without a hint of a flat spot all the way to its screaming 8400rpm redline.

    With such ferocious performance, you tend to arrive at corners a lot faster than you were expecting. Fortunately, the sharp steering is full of feel and the car always stays incredibly flat and composed.

    To get even close to the limits, you’ll need to take it to a track, and Porsche reckons 85% of buyers will do exactly that.

    Back on the road, the ride is obviously firm, but it’s nowhere near as punishing as you might think and is beautifully controlled. In fact, aside from a heavy clutch and the considerable road noise the car generates, it’s surprisingly easy to spend time in.

    What's it like inside?

    Porsche’s Clubsport package, which includes a roll cage, seat belt harnesses and a fire extinguisher, is standard, so the GT3 RS 4.0 feels every inch the racing car from behind the wheel.

    The fact that the air-conditioning and stereo have been binned to save weight merely adds to this impression, although Porsche will put these creature comforts back in and delete the Clubsport package if you want something a little less hardcore.

    There are no rear seats and the buckets upfront have only limited adjustment. However, this isn’t the problem you might think it is because they provide fantastic support and the driving position is spot-on. Just don’t expect to see much out of the back window – the car’s huge wing forces you to rely on the door mirrors. 

    Should you buy one?

    If only you could. The GT3 RS 4.0 doesn’t officially go on sale until July, but all 600 examples have already found homes, and it’s easy to see why.

    With the GT3 RS 4.0, Porsche has created one of the world’s most intoxicating road cars ever and the ultimate track day weapon – it’s both sharper and faster than the BMW M3 GTS, which costs similar money.

    True, the GT3 RS 4.0 carries a £19,343 premium over the 3.8-litre car, but that’s a trifling amount to the people it’s aimed at.

    What Car rating: ***** (5 stars)

    Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_What-Car

    Smiley SmileySmiley 


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Driven: Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0...

     

    The car you see here represents the end of two eras, writes John Simister. And a third (rather short) one because all 600 examples of the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 have already been snapped up by buyers eager for a piece of history. Of these, around 35 – one per Porsche dealer – will come to the UK. So if you haven't placed your order, you'll just have to imagine the RS 4.0 experience with the help of the words that follow.

    This is the last 997-era 911 before an all-new range is revealed at this coming September's Frankfurt show. The next generation will still have a flat-six engine in the tail, derived from the new-generation engines already found in most 911s, Caymans and Boxsters, but the rest of the car will be a complete re-design. But there's something else historic about GT3 911s, which is that they have never adopted this new-generation engine because the dizzy revs a GT3 reaches are too high for the new engine's direct-injection system. 

    So all GT3s, including this latest one, still have an engine block directly descended from the original 911 engine of 1963, complete with dry sump and separate oil tank. Of course the cylinders and heads long since become water-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and two camshafts per cylinder head, but the line of descent is clear. 

    That original engine had a 2.0-litre capacity. This one, unbelievably, is double that, which makes it the largest engine that has ever hung behind a Porsche's rear wheels. The extra capacity comes from a longer stroke, the bores already being at the limit, and it results in an extra 50bhp over the outgoing 3.8-litre GT3 RS to make 500bhp at 8250rpm. That's 911 Turbo power, but delivered in a very different way; its torque peak is 339lb ft at 5750rpm, suggestive of the need to keep the revs flying. That ain't necessarily so, as we shall see. 

    This GT3 RS is full of race-specification, or at least race-inspired, components to help it to a low 1360kg unladen weight. The engine's connecting rods are titanium. The bonnet and front wings are carbonfibre, as is the handmade air-filter box designed to eliminate detectable pressure differences either side of the two cone filters' elements. The rear side windows are polycarbonate, there's a rollcage in place of the rear seats in usual GT3 fashion, and the rear wing atop the lightweight engine cover has a 9deg angle of attack instead of a regular GT3's 5deg to give a hefty 190kg of downforce at the claimed 193mph top speed. Tiny winglets ahead of the front wheelarches help keep the front wheels in road contact while this is happening. 

    Underneath, we find GT2 RS-type suspension components such as the soft 'helper' springs under the stiff main ones, designed to absorb small bumps with acceptable suppleness, and solid Rose joints – six per side – for all the lower pivots of the rear suspension. The upper pivots retain rubber, without which the ride would be too harsh and the steering response too 'darty'. All of the foregoing results in a 911 able to lap the Nürburgring Nordschleife in 7m 27sec, which is 3.8 seconds fewer than the GT3 RS 3.8 required and also quicker than a Carrera GT. Without the front winglets, apparently this latest GT3 would take off at the circuit's Pflanzgarten section. 

    Fine. Could you live with it on the road? The engine has, at 12.4 to one, an extraordinarily high compression ratio for an indirectly injected unit, so you would expect harshness and bad behaviour if attempting to accelerate hard from low revs. There is neither. You can put your foot down at just over 1000rpm and feel a strong surge of instant torque, something GT3s to date have not offered unless already singing at several thousand. At 4000rpm there's a deepening of exhaust note – pressing Sport (hardly a vital adjunct to a car like this) ensures the note is there from the off – and the RS really starts to hurtle as the four variable camshafts find their optimum rotational angles. 

    You can blaze around the lanes all day, as I did, and seldom see more than about 6000rpm on the tachometer. You can stay in a high gear and still have more overtaking urge on tap than anything else you're likely to encounter. But if you do let the revs rip and head towards the figure eight, you're rewarded with a truly extraordinary blast of aural and accelerative energy, a hard-edged rip which cannons you from one bend's apex straight the point where the (£5924 optional) carbon-ceramic brakes dissipate it all before the next one. From a standstill to 62mph takes 3.9sec, to 124mph under 12. 

    All the while the RS steers with a precision that's simultaneously meaty and delicate, rear end squirming slightly as power and topography attempt an accommodation, nose always glued. Your sense of balance lets you know the engine is behind you, but such are the grip and the traction that pendulous oversteer just doesn't materialise. Not on a dry road, anyway; a wet race track might be another matter. It rides well, too, on its two-range adaptive dampers. Probably better than the Carrera GTS recently tested here, actually. 

    Just two snags. Surprisingly, heel-and-toe pedal work was very difficult in the left-hand-drive test car, which was probably just a matter of accelerator adjustment. And you do find yourself wondering just how you can enjoy all this pace on our crowded roads without becoming a social outcast. You need either to live somewhere like Northumberland or have a regular trackday date. 

    Oh, and the price list starts at £128,466, with an extra £1295 for the rather cool, ultra-lightweight, lithium-ion battery. But it doesn't matter, because they've all gone...

    Porsche-911-GT3-RS-4-litre_Classic-Driver

     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    Isn't it great that Porsche can out do itself by continuing to build a better "the greatest 911 ever" !


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    964C2:

    Isn't it great that Porsche can out do itself by continuing to build a better "the greatest 911 ever" !

     I guess we will hear that again in a few month !! Smiley


    --

     997.2 C2S, PDK, -20mm


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

     I do not understand the fuss about this car. It cost as much as the GT2RS and if I am correct the GT2RS is faster. The GT3 3.8 is almost as fast and about 40% cheaper.

    What is the attraction? They are making only 600 of them? Big deal; most of these track Porsche's look alike. Why in god name would anyone pay $60-$70,000 more for this car?


    --

     


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    nberry:

     I do not understand the fuss about this car. It cost as much as the GT2RS and if I am correct the GT2RS is faster. The GT3 3.8 is almost as fast and about 40% cheaper.

    What is the attraction? They are making only 600 of them? Big deal; most of these track Porsche's look alike. Why in god name would anyone pay $60-$70,000 more for this car?


    I think if you were to drive this car on a track you'd change your tune Smiley

    I should caveat that statement a bit, especially having driven "only" the standard GT3. It seems from the preliminary reviews that journalists are smitten, then again that is how they reacted to the 3.8 RS. Regardless, I would definitely order one if I had the money.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    nberry:

     I do not understand the fuss about this car. It cost as much as the GT2RS and if I am correct the GT2RS is faster. The GT3 3.8 is almost as fast and about 40% cheaper.

    What is the attraction? They are making only 600 of them? Big deal; most of these track Porsche's look alike. Why in god name would anyone pay $60-$70,000 more for this car?

    Nick, you need to embrace it and you will have different feelings towards the car Smiley  It's 155k cheaper than the GT2 RS over here. So it is probably about 70k cheaper in the States than the 2RS.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    nberry:

     I do not understand the fuss about this car. It cost as much as the GT2RS and if I am correct the GT2RS is faster. The GT3 3.8 is almost as fast and about 40% cheaper.

    What is the attraction? They are making only 600 of them? Big deal; most of these track Porsche's look alike. Why in god name would anyone pay $60-$70,000 more for this car?

    Well, I guess that the GT3 (rs) has always been a car that appeals to a certain group of people. Thing is that that particular group is also the die-hard group of porschephiles.

    So it is not weird that this car gets praised so much. Another thing is that not everything can be measured by numbers, right? For example, how do you quantify the beauty of the ferrari exhaust noise? ;-)


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    +1  - just came back from a fantastic 1200 km journey at Lake Garda Italy - and the RS seats are the biggest surprise how comfortable they are - next to the sound the car makes with the Sport Mode pressed (valve opens at 3k instead of 4k) it's a fantastic daily-car.....never thought I would say that and having driven today my friends 458 - it's actually less hard on "road-imperfections" too......so maybe call me "die-hard" porsche fan - but go out once drive a RS and it's go-kart like handling and you'd be amazed about it's everyday capability. Hope to get my hands on a 4.0 to compare once.


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    First RS 4.0 cars in Germany will be delivered at Porsche Zuffenhausen in 1o days (on 1st july 2011).


    Re: GT3 RS 4.0

    nberry:

     I do not understand the fuss about this car. It cost as much as the GT2RS and if I am correct the GT2RS is faster. The GT3 3.8 is almost as fast and about 40% cheaper.

    What is the attraction? They are making only 600 of them? Big deal; most of these track Porsche's look alike. Why in god name would anyone pay $60-$70,000 more for this car?

    Nick, don't resist, just give yourself over to the "Force" Smiley


     
    Edit

    Forum

    Board Subject Last post Rating Views Replies
    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part I) Thread Closed 9/24/20 12:47 AM
    watt
    629690 2849
    Porsche Sticky The moment I've been waiting for... 12/30/20 9:03 AM
    rhino
     
     
     
     
     
    389510 1279
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New Porsche 911 Turbo S (2020) 7/4/21 12:06 PM
    nberry
    91572 1094
    Porsche Sticky Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos) 7/28/21 4:07 PM
    pgouveia
    49471 354
    Porsche Sticky ROAD TEST: New 992 Carrera 4S 3/3/21 10:57 PM
    Wonderbar
    37437 336
    Porsche Sticky Porsche Taycan Turbo S - Short Review 10/19/20 6:12 PM
    Leawood911
    34919 380
    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA (Part II) 8/2/21 4:14 PM
    lexs4
    21735 465
    Porsche Sticky Porsche extends the Taycan model range (Taycan 2WD) 2/1/21 12:42 PM
    Leawood911
    5755 29
    Porsche Cayman GT4 5/4/21 4:46 PM
    Topspeed
    447869 3586
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 GT2 RS (2017) 6/25/21 2:56 PM
    the-missile
    373838 3506
    McLaren McLaren on a winning streak 6/22/21 5:42 PM
    Topspeed
    373447 3917
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 991.2 GT3 RS (2018) 4/28/21 12:26 PM
    W8MM
    336305 3252
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 R (2016) 12/8/20 7:51 PM
    DJM48
    312779 2646
    Porsche Tesla Roadster 9/23/20 8:22 PM
    bluelines
    282894 4279
    Porsche OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car 7/20/21 3:10 PM
    Topspeed
    239511 1567
    Porsche OFFICIAL: New Panamera (2016) 2/11/21 9:22 AM
    Itsme
    163668 1379
    Porsche 992 GT3 7/31/21 11:32 PM
    bvineyards
    150212 2840
    Others Alfa Romeo 4C 9/23/20 10:22 AM
    RCA
    139628 792
    Lambo Lamborghini Huracan and variants 4/9/21 4:32 PM
    Topspeed
    113319 1225
    Porsche Donor vehicle for Singer Vehicle Design 7/30/21 4:07 PM
    WhoopsyM
    96736 735
    Porsche Welcome to the new Taycan Forum! 7/5/21 4:30 PM
    BjoernB
    80164 1221
    McLaren F1 7/10/21 7:43 AM
    BiTurbo
    78586 209
    AMG AMG GT R 7/8/21 3:07 PM
    CGX car nut
    67380 824
    Lambo Aventador and SV 7/10/21 1:17 AM
    4trac
    67163 697
    Porsche 991 Speedster 9/3/20 4:29 PM
    Topspeed
    64577 878
    Porsche Nürburgring - Tesla vs. Taycan 11/23/20 6:10 PM
    Topspeed
    46738 596
    Others Bugatti Chiron 7/22/21 6:55 PM
    Topspeed
    38436 480
    Ferrari Ferrari 812 Superfast 6/24/21 6:30 PM
    Porker
    35217 531
    Porsche Olive 991.2 GT3 Clubsport 1/1/21 7:58 PM
    throt
    35197 615
    Others Tesla 2 the new thread 7/31/21 9:40 PM
    Gladstone
    30012 1117
    269 items found, displaying 1 to 30.