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    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    For NA engines, the only way to get more power to rev higher for a given engine displacement. Going for more cylinders is the only way to get smaller pistons. 

    But at the end of the day I don't get this new Murray car, it doesn't seem plausible and possible.

    100 cars at at least 2 million pounds each, say 2.5mil. That's only 250mil pounds. Not a lot if the car is completely bespoke with nothing shared with anything. 

    The brand new engine is already eating up a giant chunk of that budget. Then there is the bespoke carbon fibre monocoque.

    One thing I think I can bet on is that if the car becomes reality, it will only be for Europe and RoW only.

    If you might be interested, I hear it's £600k upfront to get on the list... which already includes some McLaren F1 owners! Smiley


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    I agree with you Nick, developing this car with this small budget seems impossible.


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    For NA engines, the only way to get more power to rev higher for a given engine displacement. Going for more cylinders is the only way to get smaller pistons. 

    But at the end of the day I don't get this new Murray car, it doesn't seem plausible and possible.

    100 cars at at least 2 million pounds each, say 2.5mil. That's only 250mil pounds. Not a lot if the car is completely bespoke with nothing shared with anything. 

    The brand new engine is already eating up a giant chunk of that budget. Then there is the bespoke carbon fibre monocoque.

    One thing I think I can bet on is that if the car becomes reality, it will only be for Europe and RoW only.

    If you might be interested, I hear it's £600k upfront to get on the list... which already includes some McLaren F1 owners! Smiley

    Murray is putting his faith in his iStream manufacturing process to make this car a reality. However, the budget does seem tight for all the systems that need development for the car including the powertrain.  He has done it before so the odds remain in his favor.  


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    I would have to think the Cosworth charged Aston Martin for most of Murray's engine development.

    And look at koenigsegg. It is possible...


    --

    Past-President, Porsche Club of America - Upper Canada Region


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    I'm a little surprised at the skepticism of some of the members here in regard to the feasibility of a the project. Particularly since Murray is involved. However, I'm in no position to purchase a car at a such a price, hence my rosy outlook. And I guess the SLR was not specifically a "success" either. 

    All that being said, I would take this over the equivalent Aston or Benz product. Would be fun to see a venn diagram of the owners of these three cars. I suspect there will be considerable overlap. 

     

     


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    CGX car nut:
    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    For NA engines, the only way to get more power to rev higher for a given engine displacement. Going for more cylinders is the only way to get smaller pistons. 

    But at the end of the day I don't get this new Murray car, it doesn't seem plausible and possible.

    100 cars at at least 2 million pounds each, say 2.5mil. That's only 250mil pounds. Not a lot if the car is completely bespoke with nothing shared with anything. 

    The brand new engine is already eating up a giant chunk of that budget. Then there is the bespoke carbon fibre monocoque.

    One thing I think I can bet on is that if the car becomes reality, it will only be for Europe and RoW only.

    If you might be interested, I hear it's £600k upfront to get on the list... which already includes some McLaren F1 owners! Smiley

    Murray is putting his faith in his iStream manufacturing process to make this car a reality. However, the budget does seem tight for all the systems that need development for the car including the powertrain.  He has done it before so the odds remain in his favor.  

    The engine will be built to Gordon Murray's specification by Cosworth and the gearbox by Xtrac. The brakes, suspension, wheels, carbon tub and body panels will also be built and supplied to specification by experienced third-party suppliers. Hence, a large part of the costs of the project will be known and agreed up front.

    It's worth keeping in mind that this will be a very high profile supercar and suppliers will be extremely motivated to be part of the project. The publicity and credentials from being a supplier will be of significant value.

    Those in the automotive and motorsport press will be very keen to write about Gordon Murray's new F1 supercar, to film it and to drive it...  1554541446878image.gif

    Those customers that had faith in Gordon Murray to pay £540,000 back in 1994 for the original McLaren F1 have been rewarded with a unique three-seater V12 supercar that is now worth more than 20 times the original price... Smiley

    You won't be surprised to hear that the list of depositors includes existing and former owners of the McLaren F1... Smiley

    1559944142277image.jpeg

    ...25 years after the original McLaren F1...  1554541446878image.gif 


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Here is an interesting read for someone thinking of buying a F1. I imagine it would be the same for the T50.

    https://finance.nine.com.au/personal-finance/what-it-costs-to-run-a-mclaren-f1/acf42f51-26ce-4545-8c3c-bc1485f3a2d6


    --

     

    Failing to prepare is preparing to fail.

     


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    1560028454977image.jpeg


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    For NA engines, the only way to get more power to rev higher for a given engine displacement. Going for more cylinders is the only way to get smaller pistons. 

    But at the end of the day I don't get this new Murray car, it doesn't seem plausible and possible.

    100 cars at at least 2 million pounds each, say 2.5mil. That's only 250mil pounds. Not a lot if the car is completely bespoke with nothing shared with anything. 

    The brand new engine is already eating up a giant chunk of that budget. Then there is the bespoke carbon fibre monocoque.

    One thing I think I can bet on is that if the car becomes reality, it will only be for Europe and RoW only.

    If you might be interested, I hear it's £600k upfront to get on the list... which already includes some McLaren F1 owners! Smiley

     

    I have absolutely no interest in this car. 

    To put it frankly it's a bastard. It's isn't a pure GT car, which by my definition needs to carry at least 2 people and 2 sets of golf clubs and luggage. Some sports cars can already do it, like Corvette and 911s. 

    And after begin spoiled by race cars, any track focused street car will be a compromise. For that price I will get a 911RSR instead, with the leftover money hiring a race team to support the car. Arguably the RSR will sound better also.

    Heck I gathered that the 1/2 million dollar GT2RS Clubsport will run rings around this Gordon Murray car on any track. Or a GT3R for that matters.

     

     

     

     


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    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    I completely agree. I am not into tracking cars but if I did I would get a real track car and not compromise on a road car to do so. Safety alone, the car to use on the track would need to have a roll cage and a fire extinguisher.

    Also road cars like the McLaren 720 are so good and fast now, there is no need to compromise fun and use on the road for a road car.


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    Nick, you are correct that choosing the number of cylinders is a balancing between the ability to rev higher (more smaller cylinders) and friction/weight (fewer is preferred).  When you balance these factors in a high performance engine, you arrive at the optimum cylinder size being in the neighborhood of 350cc.  The reason that many F1 engines went to V10's in 1989 is that the displacement limit was 3.5L and a V10 gave ten cylinders of 350cc capacity.

    When the F1 rules changed to 3.0L limits in 1995, most of the top teams continued with V10's.  So, I assume the optimum cylinder size was likely on the slightly lower side of 350cc (between 300 and 350cc).  Downsizing to V8's would have resulted in cylinder sizes of 375cc and the teams must have concluded that ten 300cc cylinders was more optimum than eight 375cc cylinders.

    This Gordon Murray motor is nearly 4.0L (3.98L), so going to V12 is preferred over a V10 or V8 for this capacity (332cc for V12 cylinders is nearly perfect, rather than 398cc for V10 or nearly 500cc for V8).


    --

     

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi

     


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Grant:
    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    Nick, you are correct that choosing the number of cylinders is a balancing between the ability to rev higher (more smaller cylinders) and friction/weight (fewer is preferred).  When you balance these factors in a high performance engine, you arrive at the optimum cylinder size being in the neighborhood of 350cc.  The reason that many F1 engines went to V10's in 1989 is that the displacement limit was 3.5L and a V10 gave ten cylinders of 350cc capacity.

    When the F1 rules changed to 3.0L limits in 1995, most of the top teams continued with V10's.  So, I assume the optimum cylinder size was likely on the slightly lower side of 350cc (between 300 and 350cc).  Downsizing to V8's would have resulted in cylinder sizes of 375cc and the teams must have concluded that ten 300cc cylinders was more optimum than eight 375cc cylinders.

    This Gordon Murray motor is nearly 4.0L (3.98L), so going to V12 is preferred over a V10 or V8 for this capacity (332cc for V12 cylinders is nearly perfect, rather than 398cc for V10 or nearly 500cc for V8).


    --

     

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi

     

    Smiley

    We are so getting the other Nick totally lost now Smiley


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    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    So true, So true.kiss

    In my defense, I’m the type of person who is more interested in the end result rather than the details. indecision


    --

    Failing to prepare is preparing to fail.


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Whoopsy:
    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Whoopsy:

    Now for more engine facts. 

    For the same displacement, a V12 will have more inherit friction loss than a V8, more moving parts and surfaces. One reason way back then F1 went to V10 as a compromise between piston speed vs friction loss. Not to mention weight.

    For NA engines, the only way to get more power to rev higher for a given engine displacement. Going for more cylinders is the only way to get smaller pistons. 

    But at the end of the day I don't get this new Murray car, it doesn't seem plausible and possible.

    100 cars at at least 2 million pounds each, say 2.5mil. That's only 250mil pounds. Not a lot if the car is completely bespoke with nothing shared with anything. 

    The brand new engine is already eating up a giant chunk of that budget. Then there is the bespoke carbon fibre monocoque.

    One thing I think I can bet on is that if the car becomes reality, it will only be for Europe and RoW only.

    If you might be interested, I hear it's £600k upfront to get on the list... which already includes some McLaren F1 owners! Smiley

     

    I have absolutely no interest in this car. 

    To put it frankly it's a bastard. It's isn't a pure GT car, which by my definition needs to carry at least 2 people and 2 sets of golf clubs and luggage. Some sports cars can already do it, like Corvette and 911s. 

    And after begin spoiled by race cars, any track focused street car will be a compromise. For that price I will get a 911RSR instead, with the leftover money hiring a race team to support the car. Arguably the RSR will sound better also.

    Heck I gathered that the 1/2 million dollar GT2RS Clubsport will run rings around this Gordon Murray car on any track. Or a GT3R for that matters.

    That's why so many people are looking to silent, fast Teslas for city driving! Smiley​​​​​​

    I agree though mostly. I daily drive and SUV because I can schlep my wife, two boys and crap easily and around town or on the 100km/h limited highway there isn't a reason for much else. On the track I have a fast, fun track car without the limitations of street legality. It's as fast as an older cup car. If I want to go faster on just fun lapping I'll get a radical. It will blow the doors off any million dollar supercar on the track. 


    --

    Past-President, Porsche Club of America - Upper Canada Region


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Top Gear: Here’s how Gordon Murray’s V12 T50 supercar might look*

    1564087920079image.jpeg

    This isn’t Gordon Murray’s new T50 supercar, but it’s a good – if unofficial – look at how the fabled McLaren F1 designer’s newest creation might just turn out.

    TG enlisted the help of chief renderiser person Andrei Avarvari to put some meat on the bones of the original, official sketch we saw only last month (see below). The results, as you can see, reveal something quite special indeed.

    “The new car is 30mm wider than the F1 and 18mm longer,” Murray told TG, “but it’s got more luggage space. We have got 50 per cent easier ingress and egress than the F1 too, thanks to lower structures either side of the driver, instead of those high carbon-fibre rails.

    “I don’t like cars getting bigger, I don’t like no luggage space and I don’t like the styling that looks like it’s been done for a lap time.

    “It’s about purity and dynamics,” he added.

    So that’s the design bit then. You of course, will have your own unique opinion on the looks, but the hardware’s solid. There’s a 3.9-litre naturally-aspirated V12 designed and built by Cosworth, producing 650bhp. Murray reckons the roof-scoop ram-air effect should boost that still to 700bhp at speed.

    And in even better news, that nat-asp V12 revs to 12,100rpm. There’s no flywheel; instead a ‘plate to react to the clutch loads’. Plus a manual six-speed gearbox. Plus rear-wheel-drive. Speaking of the rear, you’ll have spotted the fan at the back. It’s 400mm in diameter, interacting with the top surface of the car and operated by a 48v electrical system, not engine power.

    The whole car will also weigh less than a tonne, be able to seat three people and – as mentioned – their luggage, and cost £2.5m, with just 100 cars planned.

    Now you can get excited.

    Pictures: Andrei Avarvari for Top Gear

    1564087932392image.jpeg

    Link:  https://www.topgear.com/car-news/supercars/heres-how-gordon-murrays-v12-t50-supercar-might-look

    Smiley


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50





    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Love that project, the perfect antidote to the next-gen hypercars/EV's. 


    --

    1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3  / 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS (sold) / 2011 Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG Performance / 2014 BMW-Alpina D3 biturbo Touring / 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Clubsport


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    I love this project too. And a big fan of Mr. Murry. But that fan is a little odd looking. Of course, it is very hard to judge these things without seeing it in person. 


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Gordon Murray Automotive partners with Racing Point Formula One team to ensure T.50 supercar has most advanced aerodynamics ever

    • Collaboration with Racing Point Formula One Team will facilitate access to state-of-the-art wind tunnel and the pinnacle of motorsport expertise
    • First official T.50 image reveals purity and drama
    • Murray shares details of ground-effect ‘fan car’ innovation that rewrites the rulebook for road-car aerodynamics
    • Six aero modes enable driver to optimise dynamic and outright performance
    • Vmax Mode and ram induction boost T.50 output to 700hp

    Gordon Murray Automotive (GMA) is partnering with the Racing Point Formula One Team to further develop and test the aerodynamics of its forthcoming T.50 supercar. According to Professor Gordon Murray, the driver-focused new model will have the most advanced and most effective aerodynamics ever seen on a road car.

    In addition to utilising the race team’s advanced rolling-road wind tunnel at its Silverstone (UK) headquarters, GMA will gain insight and expertise from Racing Point’s highly-experienced engineers.

    The announcement comes as GMA reveals the first official image of the T.50 supercar ahead of its global unveiling – set for May 2020. The rendering shows the purity and drama of the T.50, which has been penned by Professor Gordon Murray and the design team at Gordon Murray Design.

    Contrasting with the clean lines of the T.50 body, perhaps the most notable feature of the exterior is the rear-end, which is dominated by a 400mm ground-effect fan – part of a unique airflow management system. Coupled with active underbody aerodynamics and dynamic rear aerofoils, the revolutionary aero system enables the T.50 to achieve considerably more aerodynamic performance and control than a conventional ground-effect supercar contributing to an unrivalled driving experience.

    The T.50 features six different aero modes that optimise the car for different scenarios to balance traction and outright performance. The most extreme – Vmax Mode – combines motorsport slipstream technology, extra power from a 48-volt integrated starter-generator, and ram induction to boost power to 700hp.

    The announcement comes as customer allocations of the T.50, priced in excess of £2 million before taxes, enter their final phase. The majority of the exclusive production run of 100 cars has already been allocated to automotive enthusiasts. The supercar has generated demand from a wider than expected global customer base, with a significant number heading to customers in the USA and Japan.

    Weighing just 980kg, the T.50 will deliver the purest, most driver-focused performance and dynamics of any road car. The car’s bespoke Cosworth V12 will be the highest-revving road car engine ever made, capable of an extraordinary 12,100rpm.

    The rear-wheel drive T.50 features Murray’s favoured three-seat layout, with the driver benefitting from a central ‘jet-fighter-style’ driving position. Aligned with Gordon Murray’s claim that the T.50 could be the pinnacle of great analogue supercars, the driver-centric analogue controls are positioned to provide the ultimate, highly-intuitive, and totally-immersive driving experience.

    Formula One aerodynamics partnership 

    The Racing Point Formula One Team rebranded from Racing Point Force India earlier this year, under the leadership of Canadian businessman Lawrence Stroll. The Racing Point HQ in Silverstone (UK) is the hub for all of the race team’s design, R&D, component manufacture, and its race car production.

    The partnership with Gordon Murray Automotive will see the T.50 move from software-based aerodynamic testing (via computational fluid dynamics) to physical testing in the Racing Point rolling-road wind tunnel from early next year. Few facilities in the world can offer T.50 such sophisticated, performance-focused aerodynamic testing capabilities and allow the use of a 40% scale model.

    Team owner, Lawrence Stroll, said: “Working on the T.50 with Gordon Murray Automotive is an honour and a privilege for everyone at Racing Point. Our aerodynamicists will utilise our wind tunnel to harness the very latest Formula One expertise and experience for the T.50 project, ensuring Gordon’s revolutionary fan concept delivers its full potential. I have admired the design and engineering skills of Gordon Murray since his earliest days in Formula One, so it is a personal pleasure to support this project, which truly rewrites the rulebook on aerodynamics.”

    Professor Gordon Murray CBE, Chairman of Gordon Murray Group, said:“Formula One remains a deep passion of mine, so partnering with Racing Point to develop the T.50 is hugely exciting. I’ve dreamt of delivering a road car with a ground-effect fan since I designed the Brabham BT46B F1 racing car in 1978. The system on the T.50 is much more sophisticated than the Brabham’s and will benefit enormously from Racing Point’s expertise and resources.”

    The most advanced aerodynamics of any road car

    The T.50 takes road-car aerodynamics to entirely new levels with Murray’s ground-breaking design significantly enhancing the supercar’s ground-effect capabilities. To achieve unmatched aerodynamic performance, the car’s 400mm fan rapidly accelerates air passing under the car, forcing it through active boundary-layer control ducts that form part of the rear diffuser.

    The fan and its associated ducting system build on conventional ground effect systems by actively helping control both the underbody and overbody airflow ensuring that both airflow systems interact to ensure absolute control of the enhanced aerodynamics and improve the car’s performance.

    The underbody airflow system allows Gordon Murray Automotive to achieve purity of design for the car’s upper surfaces, with air flowing over the top of the car undisturbed by unsightly vents, ducts, or flaps. At the rear, air is channelled down through vents to cool the powertrain oil. Also, a pair of active aerofoils at the rear of the car contribute to downforce or shedding drag, as required.

    The fan’s design and underbody ducting does away with the need for a ‘skirt’ – like that of the BT46B Fan Car – while the vertical inlet ducting ensures no road debris passes through the fan. The novel system has multiple benefits, enhancing engine cooling, boosting downforce and maximising efficiency. The various fan functions, combined with the underbody ducting and activation of the rear aerofoils, are controlled seamlessly as part of the car’s six distinct aero modes.

    Two modes operate without any driver input. ‘Auto Mode’ is the car’s default, which optimises use of the rear aerofoil, fan and underbody diffusers in response to speed and driver inputs. When high levels of deceleration are required, ‘Braking Mode’ deploys the rear aerofoils automatically and the fan operates simultaneously at high speed. This function doubles the levels of downforce, enhancing stability and grip, and enables the T.50 to pull up a full 10 metres shorter when braking from 150mph.

    The other four aero modes are driver-selectable. ‘High Downforce Mode’ delivers enhanced traction – where the fan and the aerofoils work together to increase downforce by 30%. At the flick of a switch, the driver can shift to ‘Streamline Mode’, to reduce drag by 10% and boost straight-line speed, while also reducing fuel consumption and downforce. This mode closes the underbody ducts and sets the fan to operate at high speed to extend the trailing wake of the car, creating a ‘virtual longtail’.

    When maximum velocity is required, the ‘Vmax Mode’ can be deployed by the driver at the push of a button. This utilises the same aerodynamic configuration as ‘Streamline Mode’, but adds an extra boost of around 30hp for up to three minutesby adding power to the crankshaft from the car’s 48-volt integrated starter-generator.

    Finally, ‘Test Mode’ operates when the car is at standstill to demonstrate the capability of the aero system.

    Purity and drama – official T.50 styling revealed 

    Since the T.50 was announced in June this year, media have speculated on the design of the supercar. No official images have been revealed by the Gordon Murray Design team – until now. The rear three-quarter image released by the Surrey-based design team shows how purity and drama are combined to produce a unique and distinctive supercar.

    Aerodynamics plays a critical role in defining the proportions and styling of the T.50. Clean, flowing upper surfaces contrast sharply with the dramatic rear, which is dominated by a prominent 400mm-diameter fan. The entire rear end design is technically driven, with the fan, engine exhaust, ground effect diffusers and engine bay cooling featuring prominently.

    Down its centre-line the rear deck rises subtly to accommodate the substantial 'fan assembly', the trailing edge of which extends just beyond the rear. Flanking the fan outlet on the upper surface are a pair of dynamic aerofoils that actively manage airflow at speed, according to the aero mode in operation.

    The profile of the T.50 is distinguished by the radiator exit duct outlet behind the front wheel and the profiled dihedral door and monocoque. This concept of ‘functional bodywork’ is also evident in the engine ram induction duct in the roof of the car.

    Professor Murray said: “We were highly focused on achieving the purest possible form for the T.50, an objective we’ve achieved through world-first engineering innovations and active underbody aerodynamics. We will reveal the completed design at the T.50 supercar’s global debut in May.”

    Customer uptake grows strongly as T.50 development continues at a pace

    Professor Murray said: “We’ve been taken aback by the enthusiastic reaction of buyers from across the globe. The first customer deliveries will take place in January 2022, on schedule, with every customer who has already been allocated their T.50 receiving their car that year.”

    As whole-vehicle and component development continues at pace, the completed body will be ready for physical aero testing early in the first quarter of 2020. Then, before the mid-year point, the world will see the T.50 in all its glory at its global unveiling in May.

    The first quarter of 2020 will also see the opening of Gordon Murray Automotive’s Customer Experience Centre at the company’s Dunsfold Park site, which includes a service centre alongside the new headquarters and manufacturing facility.

    -Ends-

    Gordon Murray Automotive – T.50 – Technical specification

    Configuration

    • Supercar with GT capability 
    • Coupé – central driving position 

    Dimensions

    • Length: 4,349 mm 
    • Width: 1,850 mm 
    • Height: 1,152 mm 
    • Wheelbase: 2,700 mm 
    • Front track: 1,586 mm 
    • Rear track: 1,525 mm 
    • Weight: 980 kg 

    Chassis / Body

    • Full carbon fibre pre-preg monocoque, carbon fibre body 

    Engine

    • Type / number: Cosworth GMA 
    • Configuration: V12 semi-structural 
    • V. angle: 65° 
    • Displacement: 3,994 cc 
    • Valve train: Double overhead camshafts / variable valve timing / 4 valves per cylinder 
    • Lubrication system: Dry sump 
    • Maximum power: 650 hp 
    • Maximum torque: 450 Nm 
    • Maximum rpm: 12,100 rpm 
    • Starter: 48-volt integrated starter 
    • Alternator: 48-volt ISG (integrated starter-generator) 

    Transmission

    • Configuration: Transverse all synchro constant mesh 
    • Speeds: 6 forward and reverse 
    • Gear selection: Manual with reverse lockout 

    Suspension

    • Front: Double wishbone with anti-roll bar 
    • Rear: Double wishbone – included axis GSP system 

    Steering

    • TypeRack and pinion with LSPA

    Aerodynamics

    • Full ground-effect with fan-assisted boundary-layer control 
    • 6 aero modes 

    About Gordon Murray Automotive

    Gordon Murray Automotive was launched in November 2017 and will manufacture exclusive low volume sports cars – the T.50 supercar will be the brand’s halo model. The company forms part of a new corporate organisation for the engineering group, and is positioned as a sister company to Gordon Murray Design.

    About Gordon Murray Design

    Gordon Murray Design is a visionary design and engineering company headquartered in Surrey, UK. Established in 2007, its focus is on developing innovative and disruptive manufacturing technologies trademarked iStream®. The company has built a global reputation as one of the finest automotive design and engineering teams in the world.

    The company’s unique approach and truly creative thinking enables Gordon Murray Design to deliver complete car programmes in a highly efficient and innovative way from concept and design, through to prototype and development for production.

    About Professor Gordon Murray, CBE

    Having spent 20 years as Technical Director to two Formula One teams from 1969-1990 Gordon Murray has a wealth of technical, design and engineering experience. At Brabham he was instrumental in two world championship wins (1981 and 1983) before three consecutive championship wins with McLaren Racing (1988, 1989 and 1990). In 1990 – after 50 Grand Prix wins – Gordon moved away from Formula One to concentrate on establishing a new company for the group, McLaren Cars Limited.

    His first project there, the F1 road car, is still regarded as one of the world’s best-engineered cars. A racing version won two world sports car championships and the Le Mans 24-hour race in 1995. McLaren Cars then completed several other successful projects culminating in the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren.

    Gordon left McLaren in 2005 to set up a Gordon Murray Design Ltd (in 2007), of which he is Chairman. The innovative British company is a world leader in automotive design, and reverses the current industry trend for sub-contracting by having a complete in-house capability for design, prototyping, and development.

    In 2017, Gordon Murray Design celebrated the company’s 10-year anniversary along with that of the iStream manufacturing process at a special event, named ‘One Formula’. Gordon also marked the 25th production anniversary of the McLaren F1 road car, and his 50th year of design and engineering.

    In May 2019, Professor Murray was made a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) by the Duke of Cambridge, Prince William, in recognition of his contributions to the motorsport and automotive sectors over the past 50 years.

    Link: https://www.gordonmurraydesign.com/t.50-articles/gordon-murray-automotive-partners-with-racing-point-formula-one-team-to-ensure-t.50-supercar-has-most-advanced-aerodynamics-ever.html

    Smiley


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Absolutely in love with this car !

    six speed manual gearbox , high revving naturally aspirated V12 , 980 kgs, small car etc ..

    hope the front looks good ( clean design too )


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    JEANTET:

    Absolutely in love with this car !

    six speed manual gearbox , high revving naturally aspirated V12 , 980 kgs, small car etc ..

    hope the front looks good ( clean design too )

    This seems to be too much for the bigger brand names to give us in the (1500 - 2000) limited edition cars and if all are spoken for, let the project begin  Smiley

     



    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    This is a great interview with Gordon Murray:


    --

     

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi

     


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Grant:

    This is a great interview with Gordon Murray:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrHHdMFBRco


    I actually didn’t realise that you posted this back then… But here is the next interview with the man himself:

    https://youtu.be/hySbZVhroWk


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Thanks!


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    Some really great insights there...


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    CASE STUDY: T.50 - Engine Spec

    Highlights:

    - 4.0 V12
    - 663 PS (652bhp) at 11500 RPM
    - 467 Nm at 9000 RPM (with 71% available from 2500 RPM)
    - 166 PS/l
    - Titanium valves, conrods and clutch housing; Titanium+Inconel exhaust
    - 178kg

    Global premier of the car is on August 4th!

     


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    His passion is evident in every part of his story. Thanks for posting!


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    0 to 11300 RPM in 0.3 sec.....


    Re: Gordon Murray - T.50

    8000RPM

    gordonmurrayautomotive

    The world’s highest-revving V12 engine on test again. Revs are rising: we’ve hit 8000rpm and there’s 4100rpm to go


     
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