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    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    sounds stupid but the impossibility to order parking sensors and a rear view camera was one of the few reasons why i bought the fiat 458 instead of the 911 GT3. i understand the 'hard-core' background of the GT3 but after all you can order a cruise control which isn't really a track car feature either.  i just don't get it, those things are so simple nowadays so why not put them into the GT3? probably because AP was worried to get even more flogged by the purists, can't think of any other reason. certainly you can put aftermarket sensors and even cameras but they have limited functionality and integration. also i was told that the warranty would be at risk when doing so.

    beside that my only other issue were the R compound tyres.

    peter


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    I wouldn't swap the lovely aluminium trim (light or dark) for painted parts instead .. paying more for less.

    with red stitching and red belts, you have enough colour contrast in the cabin. You could add red leather edged floor mats to add a bit more colour.

    red dials IMO is trying too hard .. too much colour coordination.

    I have white dials on my 7.2 GT3 .. I didn't spec it (am 2nd owner) but I quite like it. very personal thing though. may be only white sport chrono dial?

    what about light design package (adds lights to cabin at night for more 'glow')?

    you could also get painted key (to add a splash of white in to the interior).

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    agree with the above advice against colored dials.  They just don't look good to me.  Deviated stitching and belts, however, seem to integrate well with the interior. 

    Sport chrono provides some extra gadgetry in your dash, but i think it's a bit of a gimmick and you'll not mess with it after a month.  The big issue is the useless clock (aka, 'wart').  The wart isn't as ugly as teh 997 wart but it's distracting (IMO).

    Full leather is great. 

    Enjoy your car, it will be epic!


    --

    991 GT3 incoming, 964 Turbo 3.6, E36 M3 ltw S54 conversion, bunch of other stuff


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Here are a few more thoughts. On all generations until 991 all dials were changed to colour when you order this option. Now one of the instruments is an LCD display which is black when the car is off or idle and then any myriad of colours once its fired up and dependant on what screen you are using (i.e. sat nav). No longer do coloured dials look as homogenous as they once did as they are broken by that LCD instrument. I thik the factory may have got it jjust right with the iconic centre tach dial in grey (a GT3 feature) and the other dials in black.

    Secondly parking sensors. This is a good questions and one I missed. My Porsche dealer has offered a restro fitted sensor system which they say will look like factory for $800 usd installed to a friend of mine who has ordered a red 991 GT3. There are many such kits available now and its not difficult to have this done. I think its also a very good idea. Because of the way the back of the car is raised and high the system he has chosen requires no drilling into the bumper skin but the two small sensors are mounted under neath the rear valance and still give 120 degree operation.

    I personally still dont like the "wart" reagdless of what timing trickery it can provide. For the Track i use Racelogic Performance box GPS lap timer or Harrys lap timer on iPhone 5.

    I agree the alloy looks better in this black cabin and its free! I have acres of carbon fiber in my 993 but its classic grey and makes a nice contrast.

    I agree with you on the clubsport pack. We need the rear for storage. I also like the folding chair for touring and the heat. When they introduce the one piece lightweight bucket seat I may buy it for the track...

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    That red one is nice. I normally hate red,,,, scary...


    --

    throt

    "I didn't do it"


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    markow:

    sounds stupid but the impossibility to order parking sensors and a rear view camera was one of the few reasons why i bought the fiat 458 instead of the 911 GT3. i understand the 'hard-core' background of the GT3 but after all you can order a cruise control which isn't really a track car feature either.  i just don't get it, those things are so simple nowadays so why not put them into the GT3? probably because AP was worried to get even more flogged by the purists, can't think of any other reason. certainly you can put aftermarket sensors and even cameras but they have limited functionality and integration. also i was told that the warranty would be at risk when doing so.

    beside that my only other issue were the R compound tyres.

    peter

    Dear Peter, I really think it's too bad they don't make it available but I do understand Porsche wants the GT department to be a niche. If they start and provide the PDC the car will have more day practicality and thus it will lose it's niche appeal. Ofcourse it is for them to decide where they draw the line.

    To be honest I could have done it without cruisecontrol, I only want the PDC or rearview camera.  Smiley     Smiley

    Hans


    --

    -

    HS (Belgium) -  '14 Porsche 991 GT3 (oct build) - '06 BMW 335I Coupe  


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    sfo:

    I wouldn't swap the lovely aluminium trim (light or dark) for painted parts instead .. paying more for less.

    with red stitching and red belts, you have enough colour contrast in the cabin. You could add red leather edged floor mats to add a bit more colour.

    red dials IMO is trying too hard .. too much colour coordination.

    I have white dials on my 7.2 GT3 .. I didn't spec it (am 2nd owner) but I quite like it. very personal thing though. may be only white sport chrono dial?

    what about light design package (adds lights to cabin at night for more 'glow')?

    you could also get painted key (to add a splash of white in to the interior).

     

    SFO, thank you for your input! I think you might have a point! It is actually paying more for less! I think I just wanted to change it because of the 'exclusivity factor'! Because all the standard interiors have this, I wanted something else. But I  think it's a nice quality finish. 

    For this moment I am going to stick with the brushed aluminum decoration. 

    What the dials concern; I think it a shame Porsche did let the warning signs in the colored light, instead of making the lights 'whiter'. I know, it's hard to explain. But it's a bit too busy for me.

    Maybe a light design pack would be nice. but I really don't have a clue if it looks good. Can somebody please give me advice on this?

    The painted key. I think it's fun! Yes maybe I'll have this.

    Thanks for the advice.


    --

    -HS (Belgium) -  '14 Porsche 991 GT3 (oct build) - '06 BMW 335I Coupe  


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    frayed:

    agree with the above advice against colored dials.  They just don't look good to me.  Deviated stitching and belts, however, seem to integrate well with the interior. 

    Sport chrono provides some extra gadgetry in your dash, but i think it's a bit of a gimmick and you'll not mess with it after a month.  The big issue is the useless clock (aka, 'wart').  The wart isn't as ugly as teh 997 wart but it's distracting (IMO).

    Full leather is great. 

    Enjoy your car, it will be epic!

    Thanks Frayed! You too! When are you expecting yours?


    --

    - HS (Belgium)  -  '14 Porsche 991 GT3 (oct build) - '06 BMW 335I Coupe  


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    macca993:

    Here are a few more thoughts. On all generations until 991 all dials were changed to colour when you order this option. Now one of the instruments is an LCD display which is black when the car is off or idle and then any myriad of colours once its fired up and dependant on what screen you are using (i.e. sat nav). No longer do coloured dials look as homogenous as they once did as they are broken by that LCD instrument. I thik the factory may have got it jjust right with the iconic centre tach dial in grey (a GT3 feature) and the other dials in black.

    Secondly parking sensors. This is a good questions and one I missed. My Porsche dealer has offered a restro fitted sensor system which they say will look like factory for $800 usd installed to a friend of mine who has ordered a red 991 GT3. There are many such kits available now and its not difficult to have this done. I think its also a very good idea. Because of the way the back of the car is raised and high the system he has chosen requires no drilling into the bumper skin but the two small sensors are mounted under neath the rear valance and still give 120 degree operation.

    I personally still dont like the "wart" reagdless of what timing trickery it can provide. For the Track i use Racelogic Performance box GPS lap timer or Harrys lap timer on iPhone 5.

    I agree the alloy looks better in this black cabin and its free! I have acres of carbon fiber in my 993 but its classic grey and makes a nice contrast.

    I agree with you on the clubsport pack. We need the rear for storage. I also like the folding chair for touring and the heat. When they introduce the one piece lightweight bucket seat I may buy it for the track...

     

    Thanks Macca993 can you please be so kind to inform what system it is they mean? 

    Gr Hans


    --

    - HS (Belgium)  -  '14 Porsche 991 GT3 (oct build) - '06 BMW 335I Coupe  


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Hans. Its just an aftermarket $200 four sensor kit with a buzzer in the car that blips more frequently the closer you get to an object when the Reverse is selected. Nothing visual - just the same type system used in my 2001 e39 M5. Works well, reliable and cheap. Best still there is a perfect place to put it on the rear of the 991 GT3 where it is almost impossible to see and doesnt require drilling the bumper or painting. Have a look in the photo below and you can see there is a black plastic valence where the exhaust pipes protrude which is angled appropriately to get 4 sensors without them looking particularly visible.

     

    Porsche-911-GT3-729x486-f3e06a7653ba7d0b.jpg


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    !B2Utu+!B2k~$(KGrHqEOKisE)R46()hOBMi!S)ud3!~~_12.JPG

    Here is the product they recommend - $150 USD Cobra 0258 (cobra are a well known brand who make aftermarket car alarms) with new slim line 22mm sensors. You can buy on ebay. They carry replacement sensors for the future. Very simple to install with no ugly LED dash kit just hidden pizo buffer that blips just like on the older BMW etc. Works perfect and is almost invisible on the black plastic valence. Very easy install estimated at 2 hrs and $150 USD so $300 USD and you are all ready to go.....and it look better than round bumps on the lovely bumper plus that black part is replaceable by the looks of it so later you can by the factory Valence and return to normal. Cheap solution that looks less obvious than factory and gets the job done...


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    991 GT3:
    frayed:

    agree with the above advice against colored dials.  They just don't look good to me.  Deviated stitching and belts, however, seem to integrate well with the interior. 

    Sport chrono provides some extra gadgetry in your dash, but i think it's a bit of a gimmick and you'll not mess with it after a month.  The big issue is the useless clock (aka, 'wart').  The wart isn't as ugly as teh 997 wart but it's distracting (IMO).

    Full leather is great. 

    Enjoy your car, it will be epic!

    Thanks Frayed! You too! When are you expecting yours?

    Ahh, well, since I'm in the states not until Feb.

    I'll be in Belgium and Germany before the holidays.  Would love to check out your rig!


    --

    991 GT3 incoming, 964 Turbo 3.6, E36 M3 ltw S54 conversion, bunch of other stuff


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    macca993:

    Hans. Its just an aftermarket $200 four sensor kit with a buzzer in the car that blips more frequently the closer you get to an object when the Reverse is selected. Nothing visual - just the same type system used in my 2001 e39 M5. Works well, reliable and cheap. Best still there is a perfect place to put it on the rear of the 991 GT3 where it is almost impossible to see and doesnt require drilling the bumper or painting. Have a look in the photo below and you can see there is a black plastic valence where the exhaust pipes protrude which is angled appropriately to get 4 sensors without them looking particularly visible.

     

    Porsche-911-GT3-729x486-f3e06a7653ba7d0b.jpg

    I have a little experience with after-market parking sensors which leads me to believe that mounting them that low would lead to them picking up too many extraneous signals from the ground (low kerbs, etc.), which would render them almost useless. (Think of the story of the boy who cried "wolf"). 


    --

    fritz


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    991 GT3:

    Because all the standard interiors have this, I wanted something else. But I  think it's a nice quality finish. 

    Maybe a light design pack would be nice. but I really don't have a clue if it looks good. Can somebody please give me advice on this?

     

    brushed aluminium only standard on GT3 .. cost options on other 991s.

    light design package - level of light is adjustable. I had it on my 981S and I liked the soft glow in the cabin at night.


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Hi Fritz. Good point. I spoke with the dealer today. they are fitting the new cobra 0359 flush mount kit with 17mm sensors behind the bumper. Cobra supply them OEM to Audi and others. They need painting white. The minimum height should be 45cm as you say. Here is the kit its 85 GBP. They quoted around 300 Euro installed...

     

    DSC_8802.JPGDSC_8801.JPG$(KGrHqV,!rUFHNmJOmPUBR1weWET+Q~~60_12.JPG


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    macca993:

    Hi Fritz. Good point. I spoke with the dealer today. they are fitting the new cobra 0359 flush mount kit with 17mm sensors behind the bumper. Cobra supply them OEM to Audi and others. They need painting white. The minimum height should be 45cm as you say. Here is the kit its 85 GBP. They quoted around 300 Euro installed...

     

    DSC_8802.JPGDSC_8801.JPG$(KGrHqV,!rUFHNmJOmPUBR1weWET+Q~~60_12.JPG

    Good to see that the retro-fit sensors are getting smaller in (visible) diameter and that this type also allows for some angular adjustment of the sensor within the bumper.  Smiley

    NB: If you are about to order some, you'll probably want the 0358 kit (4 sensors) shown in your pic, rather than 0359 (only 2 sensors) as mentioned in your post! 

    Correction:  I just realised that the "alignment" spoken of on the web-site refers to adjustment for the wall-thickness of the bumper material to keep them flush, not to angular adjustment to compensate for the inclination of the mounting surfaces. That'll make it harder to find suitable positions for the sensors on some vehicles. 

    --

    fritz


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Sorry. typo by me. Yes 0358. Deal says they fitted these to 4.0RS for customer and very reliable and look factory. Replacement sensor only $25 not like Porsche where sensor cost $250 LOL!


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    GT3 RS wannabe:

    20130731160013_2_24051375279213.jpg20130731160012_1_34171375279212.jpg

     


    --


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Is that a GT3 RS camouflaged as a GT3?


    --

     

    2011 Porsche Carrera 4S Platinum Silver (sold)
    2013 Porsche Panamera GTS Basalt Black

    2013 Porsche Carrera S GT Silver

    “The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively” 
    ― Bob Marley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Looks like a normal 991 GT3 with some red paint on the rims, the side view mirrors and rear wing. yes


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 991 Turbo S (Sept. 2013), Cayenne GTS (958), BMW X3 35d (2013)


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    another picture like this and i can die!

    mmmhhhhh...mail

    Porsche bring us the REAL RS!!! NOOOW!!smiley

     


    --

    997TT RS Tuning stage II(sold),2011 Cayenne Turbo


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    RC are there cars in customer hands already, or is the above GT3 a factory car?


    --

    "Don't worry about avoiding temptation, as you grow older it will avoid you"  Churchill


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Porsche-Jeck:
     

     blue-5.jpg

     

    a little bit cheaper and smaller:


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    DaveC:

    RC are there cars in customer hands already, or is the above GT3 a factory car?

    No customer cars yet. First cars are expected at dealers for end of August as far as I heard.


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 991 Turbo S (Sept. 2013), Cayenne GTS (958), BMW X3 35d (2013)


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    I saw in real life a 991 in Rivierablau (which is the color posted above) and it does really look good on the 991. I would guess on the GT3 should look even better. Mexico Blue which is a shade lighter than Riviera would also be a great color for the GT3.  Porsche Exclusive has been running a road show in different German Porsche dealers showing different paint to sample 911s (but also Boxsters and Panamera`s) , this is a very intelligent marketing activity that should raise the awareness among potential customers about the customization options offered by Porsche.


    --

    911 Club Coupe, 993 4S Riviera Blau, 12' Audi S4 Avant


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    2014 Porsche 911 GT3 -- First Drive by Autoblog...

     
    "The Bearable Lightness Of Being"
     
    (1st August 2013)
     
    Start with a standard Porsche 911 Carrera and its 350-horsepower, 3.6-liter flat six-cylinder engine. Bore a crepe-thin slice of aluminum from each cylinder to get to 3.8 liters, add a wider track out back and two extra exhaust pipes and voila, you can append an S to the Carrera's name. Hang two sets of wet, multi-disc clutches along its spine and you can make that a 4, or a 4S. Bolt on two forced-induction compressors and piping, add two fender vents and comically wide rear tires and you've redeemed your ticket to a Turbo. Increase the boost pressure and swell the corral to 560 horses and you have the Turbo S, which is the Virginia Slims of the 911 line-up because it's come a long way, baby.
     
    Or you can go in a different direction. At that second stop, grab the 3.8-liter and cart it over to the engineers at Porsche's development center in Weissach, Germany. If racing were meat, they would be among the alpha carnivores. The baseboards in their homes are probably painted with miniature billboards for motor oil and vintage cigarettes along the straights, red-and-white stripes around every corner.
     
    Instead of watching them add things to the 911, watch them take away. They will subtract the kinds of things you can feel in your hands, like components and weight and mass. By doing that, they will add the things you can feel in your butt and your gut, like acceleration and handling and thrill.
     
    That has been the formula for the previous four generations of the 911 GT3, and it is that same incantation chanted over this fifth generation 991-based GT3. It's stiffer, more powerful, faster and handles better than the coupe that came before it. It weighs more than the outgoing model, but it also - as we've come to expect - has more power.
     
    And when Thomas Jefferson's line "Every generation needs a revolution" was the opening quote of the press conference that introduced the 2014 911 GT3, the easy explanation would be that the speaker was referring to the coupe's advances. But we're pretty sure he was answering the question everyone's been asking since the words "PDK-only" began being applied to the car: "What in Gott's name have you done with my manual transmission?"
     
    But let us start with the positive subtractions they made.
     
    The lineage of this car is traced back to the 1957 Porsche type 356 A 1500 GS Carrera GT, the first Porsche to wear the letters "GT." Fame would come in the '70s, though; the dynasty of Porsche's road-legal racers began with the 1972 911 Carrera RS and the ducktail by which it was known.
     
    The first 911 GT3 showed up in 1999. It weighed 2,970 pounds, got 360 hp from its 3.6-liter engine, got from 0-62 miles per hour in 4.8 seconds, didn't run out of go until 188 miles per hour and bore features still found on this new car: dry sump lubrication, forged pistons, titanium connecting rods, modified engine mounts and a limited-slip differential.
     
    By the time the second-generation 997 GT3 arrived in 2009, it was getting 435 hp from its 3.8-liter engine, ran from 0-62 mph in 4.1 seconds and had a top speed of 194 mph.
     
    And now: the new 991 GT3 produces 475 hp from a 3.8-liter flat-six, the stoplight dash to 62 mph comes off in 3.5 seconds and the top speed is 195 mph.
     
    Those are the numbers birthed by an engine whose origins date to the 1997 GT1, Porsche's Le Mans racecar that spawned a 544-hp, road-legal version homologation. The powerplant is almost entirely different from that in the regular 911, only sharing parts like the crankcase and timing chain. There's a new tubular manifold and a lighter crankshaft, dry-sump oil system and intake system. This is the first GT3 with direct injection, but it uses a different system than the regular Carrera with higher pressures.
     
    There are larger hubs and wheel carriers suspended by forged wishbones with bigger bearings, but the suspension's aluminum dampers are another source of weight savings. As on previous GT3s, the all-aluminum suspension is adjustable for height, toe and camber.
     
    The 20-inch forged aluminum wheels are nine inches wide in front – half an inch wider than on the previous generation – and 12 inches in back, the same as before. Peer behind them and you'll find the standard brakes, hybrid 380-millimeter units front and rear composed of cast iron discs with aluminum covers, or the optional PCCB brake package with its carbon ceramic rotors – 410 mm in front with six-piston calipers and 390 mm in back with four-pistons – that is also found on the upcoming 918 Spyder hybrid supercar.
     
    Lastly, increased use of aluminum for the roof, fenders, rear boot lid and doors, as well as high-strength steel, lowers the weight of the bodyshell by nearly 13 percent.
     
    So what did they add? Well, overall weight, to start. The Gen II 997 GT3 weighed 3,076 pounds, this one weighs 3,153 pounds. They also added more revolutions: the 435 hp in the last car came at 7,600 rpm, 900 rpm short of its 8,500 rpm redline, while in this one, the 475 hp clocks in at 8,250 rpm, 750 rev per minute below the 9,000 rpm redline. Torque also goes up a pinch, from 317 pound-feet at 6,250 rpm in the last GT3 to 324 lb-ft at the same 6,250 rpm.
     
    They added aggression, the bodywork nothing less than an aluminum mask of vicious sin. It's lower and wider than the last model, and torsional rigidity has climbed by 25 percent. A stouter front air dam with a fuller lower lip, straighter lines and larger mesh-covered intakes feeds more air to the radiators. The air outlet between the trunk edge and the front spoiler, as we'd find out during the afternoon rains, emits clouds of heat into cooler air.
     
    The composite rear wing is still adjustable, but the molded number "3.8," which refers to the 1993 911 RS 3.8, has moved from the wing endplates to the supports. Along with that beefier front lip, it provides 20-percent more downforce overall.
     
    It is here that we get to Houdini, and the six-speed manual transmission he took with him when he disappeared. Another line we got at the press conference: "At Porsche we all love to shift gears manually. But what we love even more is being the fastest."
     
    Porsche saved 20 kilograms with the redesigned engine, which happens to match the weight penalty incurred by the seven-speed PDK gearbox. No doubt, it is a quick transmission: the so-called "lightning shifts" during sequential manual operation take less than 100 milliseconds.
     
    While there'll be no more swapping gear ratios to suit different tracks, the PDK is "geared to performance" with every one of its seven cogs chosen for their ability to accelerate proceedings – that seventh gear is not an overdrive gear.
     
    One of its prime tricks is that it can be used like a sequential manual transmission, the driver pushing the console-mounted lever forward for downshifts, pulling back for upshifts. But there are paddles on the wheel, naturally, and they're the source of the second trick. Pull them both toward you and the gearbox goes into neutral, as if you had a real clutch to press. Release them and the PDK returns to the gear you had it in.
     
    The adoption of the PDK has made fitment of an electronically controlled, fully variable rear locking differential possible. The LSD on previous cars had fixed locking values of 28 and 40 percent.
     
    The result, on paper, is improved metrics everywhere. Porsche says it's 15 seconds faster around the Nürburgring's Northern Loop than the last GT3, going flag-to-flag in 7:25.
     
    The result, behind the wheel, is improved performance everywhere – but you've got to get to it. Slide into the Porsche Sports Seats Plus, which we won't get in the US because the seatbacks are fixed, and get into position. For the first time on a GT3, height adjustment is electric. Save for the lack of back seats, the cabin is mostly like you'd find in the 'plain' 911, except much of it is swathed in Alcantara.
     
    Turn the car on, and not much happens. The new 3.8-liter sounds exceptionally mechanical from the outside – it doesn't purr – and muted mechanical from the inside. Pull out onto the main road out of the small German town you find yourself in, and not much happens – no wild noises, no drama, a comfortable suspension, an easy seating position, plus navigation and dual-zone climate control. It's like driving... a plain old car. If you can forget about the carbon buckets, it takes a truly nasty section of road to remind you that you're driving a track car.
     
    What you quickly discover is that after you turn it on, you've got to turn it on.
     
    So you roll on a bit to let everything get toasty, then attack the German B-roads, which are winding, rolling and well tended to. Get some altitude in the rpm range and hit the throttle, making your home between 5,000 and 9,000 rpm, then everything out back goes berserk. It roars like an extraterrestrial on PCP, cut only by the sound of a large-caliber air cannon as the PDK obeys your command to hook up the next gear. Things are so well-sorted out back that as long as the road is just alright, the 12-inch rubber will find a way to stay planted.
     
    Cornering is excellent, beginning with the steering. It's lighter on center than we expected, but as soon as you apply lock it loads right up, and it provides more than just accuracy but actual steering feel – an old yet rarely seen friend in a world of electronically assisted power steering.
     
    A suspension lowered by 1.2 inches, Porsche Torque Vectoring aided by that rear diff and the active rear-wheel steering help immensely. Whereas the 2014 Porsche Turbo will offer up to 2.8 degrees of rear wheel steer, the GT3 offers up to 1.5 degrees, but it's plenty. Under 31 mph the rear wheels turn in the opposite direction to the fronts, above 50 mph they turn in the same direction. The coupe flicks around anything from a U-turn to a hairpin almost like a bearing in a rail. Long fast corners don't require heart medication while you wonder if, just maybe, you're putting too much faith in a rear end that still greets physics with a backhand to the mouth every time they meet. It's so sticky front and rear that our co-driver said at one point, "The grip never ends." Of course, that's not true. But what felt true is that the grip only ends after you cross the line marked, 'I Want to Hurt Myself.'
     
    Not being the biggest fan of paddle shifters, we spent almost all of our time behind the wheel swapping cogs with the sequential manual mode, pushing and pulling the lever into and out of corners. We found the experience the perfect middle ground between the soulless (but yes, fast) contraction of forearm flexors needed to pull paddles and the (what now seems like) geologic span of time needed to shift and get back on the power when using a third pedal.
     
    And then there's launch control. Hold down the brake, press the accelerator to the floor and listen to the car holler and wail as it holds 4,500 rpm. Let go of the brake and boom – you're 200 yards down the road before your senses can catch up to your reflexes, which have been busy shifting gears for you.
     
    When you're done filling the boondocks with the shrieking thunder of that 3.8-liter, scaring the bejeezus out of every kind of forest and farm creature, take the GT3 back down to around-town speeds and be reminded, incredibly, that you're driving... a plain old car. Kind of. Along with that high-revving wail you can't help remembering that the co-driver tailed a diesel Audi A7 that was fireballing down the highway during a serious rainstorm, and the GT3 never once fell into any skittish, floaty sports car antics. Rather, it sang Elvis to the Autobahn: "I'm gonna stick like glue, yeah yeah, because I'm stuck on you..."
     
    About the only knock we can give the driving experience is due to that ass-planting tail. Get the rear-view mirrors placed just right and don't be afraid to work your neck, because you can forget about seeing cars behind you in the rearview mirror.
     
    Way back yonder in time, the magazine Car had a section at the back of each issue that detailed the specs of every car sold in the UK. The entry to each brand was noted with a one-liner, and the tagline for Porsche was: "If you can, then you must."
     
    When it comes to the GT3, we can boil that down to one word: "Bingo."
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Vital Stats
     
    Engine: 3.8L Flat-Six
    Power: 475 HP / 325 LB-FT
    Transmission: 7-Speed PDK
    0-60 Time: 3.5 Seconds (62 mph)
    Top Speed: 195 mph
    Drivetrain: Rear-Wheel Drive
    Curb Weight: 3,153 lb
    Seating: 2
    Cargo: 4.41 CU-FT
    MPG: TBD
    Base Price: $130,400
     
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Thanks for the article mate!


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    I don't know why you would order this car in any color but red...


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Did anyone notice the Michelin Pilot Cup 2 tires??


    --

     

    2011 Porsche Carrera 4S Platinum Silver (sold)
    2013 Porsche Panamera GTS Basalt Black

    2013 Porsche Carrera S GT Silver

    “The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively” 
    ― Bob Marley


    Re: OFFICIAL: New 911 GT3 (991)

    Yes. Tread wear rating 150. 


     
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