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    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Cool! blush


    --

    "I don't mean to brag, but I am really good at self-deprecation."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Carlos from Spain:

    Chris Harris' first contact and small clip. Looking foward to his review on EVO next month, I really enjoy his insights and usually identify with them.

    http://community.evo.co.uk/users/Monkey-Harris/blogs/index.cfm/2011/11/19/CHRIS-HARRIS-New-Porsche-991-brief-thoughtsvid-clip

    'So, much as I want to complain at the creep of everydayness, I just can’t in light of the surprising improvement in raw driving...'

    Smiley Smiley Smiley

    CHRIS HARRIS: NEW PORSCHE 991, BRIEF THOUGHTS...

    "Porsche has become adept at parrying criticism of the obvious kind – that’s my lasting impression from driving the new 991. Well, that and learning California has some sparkling roads.

    Here’s how it works. I think the 991 has become unnecessarily big, but it is now so much more refined than the 997 – and I mean almost beyond comparison in terms of NVH and especially tyre noise – that it feels like a GT car. This is good for people who buy 911s for very different reasons than I would – which, I suppose, potentially makes it a bad thing for me.
     
    But it’s hard to bemoan extra width when that itself brings the biggest improvement in the car as a driving object. The extra front track width, combined with the vast increase in wheelbase gives the 991 a superb chassis. Far less understeer, much more balance and, of course, the inherent traction benefits of being rear-engined remain. So see what I mean here? It’s bigger and far more comfortable – it’s a better cruiser, but it’s also a far, far better sports car to drive as-fast-as-you-dare. I didn’t expect that.
     
    The new PDK calibration is way more immediate than before, with a much better balance of seamlessness and kick-in-the-back. The Carrera S motor is smooth, rev-hungry and yet can return over 30mpg at a fast cruise. The quality of trim and materials in the cabin makes a 997 feel like a Ford Ka.
     
    So, much as I want to complain at the creep of everydayness, I just can’t in light of the surprising improvement in raw driving.

    Expanded thoughts in the mag next month..."

    Porsche 991 Teaser video by Chris Harris, Evo magazine

    "Brief clip of 991 before full video goes live on www.evo.co.uk next week..."

    Chris Harris - HD video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8xWxoxsJHY&hd=1

    Chris Harris - Twitter link: http://twitter.com/harrismonkey

    ...looking forward to the full video review by Chris Harris! Smiley

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

     


    --

    "Things turn out best for people who make the best of the way things turn out."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    bluelines:
     

    They also said they would never build a diesel Smiley

    Well...Porsche actually never did (engine). Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 997 Carrera GTS Cabriolet PDK, BMW X5M, BMW M3 Cab DKG, Mini Cooper S Countryman All4


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    2012 Porsche 911: First Drive by Jalopnik...

     
    Does the 2012 Porsche 911 continue to advance the 911's sports-car capability, while making it accessible to the widest possible pool of potential drivers, and without throttling its famous rear-engined motoring quirkiness? Let's drive the new Carrera S and find out.
     
    Imagine a world in which lifting a Porsche 911's throttle mid-corner does not guarantee an about-face toward oncoming traffic. It's a world Porsche 911 engineers have striven to create for decades, even while the one factor that might correct the problem shan't be touched — that is the 911's engine, hanging, rucksack-like out over the rear axle.
     
    And yet, in doing so they've created a car that, in skilled hands, can do miraculous things — both despite and because of — its unique configuration. Now, here we are, driving the most radically altered 911 model since the 996. It's longer, lower and rides on a wider front track than the 997 model it replaces. It's also more efficient, thanks to a few hybrid-like tricks like a start-stop function (in the PDK transmission) and the adoption of electromechanical steering. That last one's been a controversial move, since steering feel has been one of the 911's best traits.
     
    Porsche calls the new 911 model — the 997's successor — 991 because, well, don't bother asking — it doesn't matter, anyway. Porsche executives joke that they'll still be building 911s long after they run out of potential 900-range numbers to use. And when German engineers make jokes, you know it's very serious stuff.
     
    They also say the new 911 S has beaten the previous model's Nürburgring lap time by 14 seconds, putting it in 997 GT3 and Turbo territory. That's pretty serious too.
     
    Naturally, a boost in power has been a major factor in the faster lap. The new S model's 3.8-liter flat six produces 394 hp and 325 lb-ft, continuing a relentless march upward. The base Carrera gets a downsized 3.4 liter six that produces five more horsepower than the previous 3.6-liter. From the driver's seat, the extra power translates into more dramatic launches via PDK's launch control.
     
    But an equally important difference in the new car's lap time was from the new addition of Porsche's Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active anti-roll gear. It's a novel version of a system introduced on the Cayenne that engages the stabilizer bar during cornering, while allowing the wheels independent range of motion in a straight line. That means a more comfortable highway ride, but when it's called on to change direction, the 911 stays comically flat — for a road car — responding to steering inputs with remarkable quickness.
     
    But what about the 911's typical, gut-checking rotation after turn-in? It's just not there. Yes, Porsche has largely engineered out the burble in the pit of the stomach that once arose when a 911's engine started doing its pendulum dance. Experienced 911 drivers have always known how to make the car's tail-happiness work in their favor. Now, perhaps due to the new model's longer wheelbase, that feeling is deeply in the background. You have to really screw up to get the new 911 to bite back.
     
    And then there's the steering issue. Naturally, when you mess with a Porsche 911's steering, it's like colorizing "It's a Wonderful Life." Sure, it's got its advantages, but the faithful will undoubtably huck tomatoes. The truth is, the new system delivers slightly less information to the hands, and yet the car's mechanical reflexes compensate by being so alert that it might seem petty to lament the hydraulic pump. Yes, there is a tradeoff, but it's not the end of the 911's steering mojo. That doesn't mean we're not looking forward to how engineers will improve the system in the future, especially for the next GT3 — current king of all steering.
     
    Transmission wise, the new 911 is made for dual-clutching. In Sport Plus mode, the PDK's shift times are astounding, and it's now become clear that the killer app for PDK is letting it do all the shifting work – its predictive algorithm has become just that good. If you'd rather not be tempted by the dark side, stick with the new seven-speed manual, which feels as natural as a fourth appendage. And don't worry about a missed shift – you can only grab seventh from fifth or sixth gears. And you'll only do that when you want to lope along at a couple thousand RPM, sipping high-test through a cocktail straw.
     
    The interior continues Porsche's adaptation of the Carrera GT's console design. It's a little more snug than 911s of the past, but the quality of materials and touch-point feel is better than ever. A new, high-res 4.8-inch screen in the dash cluster provides eye-line access to navigation and other features, which now include a G-Force display.
     
    The 911's relentless march upward in performance, technology and quality indeed comes at a stiff price. And that price is a base of $97,350 including $950 destination for the Carrera S (the base Carrera will cost $83,050). The 2012 911 goes on sale on 4 February 2012, so if your back pension hasn't come in by then, you may be out of luck.
     
    Indeed, the 991 is the most stable, un-scary, even-tempered 911 in the model's 49-year history. But if fear truly is the heart of love, as Catholics believe, then can anyone love a Porsche 911 that gives them nothing to fear? Yes. It's a mystery.
     
     
     
     
    SmileySmileySmiley

    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

     

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley


    --

    "I don't mean to brag, but I am really good at self-deprecation."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Carrageous:
    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

     

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley

     

    +1.  Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    I also like what BC GTS does.

    The problem is that in this new version of Rennteam i cannot embed the videos... don`t know why... yes (i think i`m not the only one...)

     


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    PureBlue:
    Carrageous:
    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley

    +1.  Smiley


    Me too... Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    pjd:

    The problem is that in this new version of Rennteam i cannot embed the videos... don`t know why... yes (i think i`m not the only one...)

     

    There have been many people asking about this, its true, the new method of embedding videos is a bit more complicated. I decided to make a simple guide with simple images that will make it easy for all of you from now on. its simple once you now how  Smiley

    Guide is here Smiley
    http://www.rennteam.com/forum/thread/20281131/Guide_How_to_EMBED_YouTube_videos_in_Rennteam/page1.html


    --


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Ferdie:
    PureBlue:
    Carrageous:
    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley

    +1.  Smiley


    Me too... Smiley

    +1 ... I really appreciate the effort he puts in ... makes it a real pleasure to read/watch etc Smiley


    --


    997.1 C2S
     GT Silver/Cocoa, -20mm/LSD, PSE, short shifter, SportDesign rims, Zuffenhausen pickup, BMW Z4 2.5i Roadster Sterling Grey/Red


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Thanks Carlos, but I would have to write this system down somewhere, and then I would forget where I wrote it.  GTS, keep 'em coming for this techno-challenged geezer...


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Carlos from Spain:
    pjd:

    The problem is that in this new version of Rennteam i cannot embed the videos... don`t know why... yes (i think i`m not the only one...)

     

    There have been many people asking about this, its true, the new method of embedding videos is a bit more complicated. I decided to make a simple guide with simple images that will make it easy for all of you from now on. its simple once you now how  Smiley

    Guide is here Smiley
    http://www.rennteam.com/forum/thread/20281131/Guide_How_to_EMBED_YouTube_videos_in_Rennteam/page1.html

    Thanks Carlos (and Ferdie) kiss

    Very good explanation from both!

    Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    pjd:
    Carlos from Spain:
    pjd:

    The problem is that in this new version of Rennteam i cannot embed the videos... don`t know why... yes (i think i`m not the only one...)

     

    There have been many people asking about this, its true, the new method of embedding videos is a bit more complicated. I decided to make a simple guide with simple images that will make it easy for all of you from now on. its simple once you now how  Smiley

    Guide is here Smiley
    http://www.rennteam.com/forum/thread/20281131/Guide_How_to_EMBED_YouTube_videos_in_Rennteam/page1.html

    Thanks Carlos (and Ferdie) kiss

    Very good explanation from both!

    Smiley


    Didn't realise it was so difficult for others to embed...once the system has been explained - it's not rocket scienceyes

    Oh well, if most seem happy with duplication then so be it...Smiley

    Personally I find it irritating and unnecessary.

     


    --

    "Things turn out best for people who make the best of the way things turn out."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    easy_rider911:
    Ferdie:
    PureBlue:
    Carrageous:
    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley

    +1.  Smiley


    Me too... Smiley

    +1 ... I really appreciate the effort he puts in ... makes it a real pleasure to read/watch etc Smiley

    I'd be +6 at this point right? Whenever i see someone post a link to a video I know BC/GTS is going to post the video, makes things so much easier. I thanks him too. 


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Enmanuel:
    easy_rider911:
    Ferdie:
    PureBlue:
    Carrageous:
    John H:

    BC/GTS - as a matter of interest.. why do you keep repeating the posts of others?

    We are all quite capable of clicking on a link and reading it's contents or watching a video in whatever resolution is available...

    Just curious....Smiley

    I love it when he does it ... wish everyone would embed the videos rather than link. I find BC/GTS's actions to be a valuable public service! Smiley

    +1.  Smiley


    Me too... Smiley

    +1 ... I really appreciate the effort he puts in ... makes it a real pleasure to read/watch etc Smiley

    I'd be +6 at this point right? Whenever i see someone post a link to a video I know BC/GTS is going to post the video, makes things so much easier. I thanks him too. 

    I really don't have the appetite, or the right, to clog up this most valuable of current threads...

    I am however really amazed at the response to my initial enquiry, which is all it was!!

    Not so very long ago regular users would have been clambering to shout 'REPOST', but now it seems to serve them as a valuable asset...yes

    I really appreciate some of BC/GTS's posts, especially the multi-photographic offerings, but to act as an enlarger, enhancer or clarifier is simply repetition.

    As Carlos and Ferdie have pointed out...It really isn't difficult to embed anything.  But that's really not the point!  If someone posts a 'simple link', how difficult can it be to click on it, read it, or re-size the video.. if that's what they require?

    Makes no sense to me!... but now let's get on with what this thread is intended for... My apologies for interrupting the flow..wink


    --

    "Things turn out best for people who make the best of the way things turn out."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    First drive: 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S...

    (15 November 2011, LA Times)

    You’ve seen the spy shots, you’ve read the breathless speculation and if you visit this year’s L.A. Auto Show where the 2012 Porsche 911 makes its North American debut, heck, you can smear your grubby hands all over the new taillights.
     
    But what really matters is how does it drive?
     
    Very well actually. But saying a Porsche 911 drives well is like saying Einstein could do long division. So let’s explore some details about the 991 to give its driving experience some context before we hit the road.
     
    The 2012 911 is known internally at Porsche, and to those bowing at the altar of the iconic German automaker, as the 991. The biggest change from the 991’s predecessor, the 997, is efficiency and growth.
     
    The wheelbase itself is about 3.9 inches longer, with the body growing 2.2 inches. This means the car’s overhangs are shorter as the wheels are essentially pushed closer to the corners of the 991. A key reason for this added length is an increased stability at high speeds, something drivers of the 997 will tell you they would appreciate.
     
    Covering these new dimensions is all-new sheet metal. The front looks nearly identical to the 997’s on paper, but in person the 991 front wears a patina of refinement that the 997 lacks. But it’s still a bit too conservative for my taste. Meanwhile the back of the 991 is seductively graceful with thinner, longer LED taillights. If only Porsche designers had managed to capture the allure of the 991 rear and apply it to the front.
     
    Inside, the 991 takes a quantum leap forward. The center stack is now nearly identical to that of the Cayenne and Panamera, with much of the chrome-trimmed switch gear for the heating and cooling pushed to the center console between the two front passengers.
     
    2012-Porsche-991_G-Force-meter.jpg
     
    Image -- 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S: G-Force display
     
    The 911’s familiar five-gauge cluster still greets the driver with the tachometer in the center, though one of the clusters is now a full-color, multifunction screen that will feed drivers data including a g-force meter, navigation instructions and a trip computer. The 991 interior gives drivers about an inch of additional legroom, with rear passengers getting more than half an inch added on (it’s still very tight for rear passengers).
     
    In addition to being larger, the 991 also grows in terms of power. The car I drove was the 911 Carrera S, which is powered by a 3.8-liter, direct-injected, six-cylinder engine. It puts out 400 horsepower and 325 pound-feet of torque, each figure a gain of 15 over the outgoing Carrera S.
     
    That maximum horsepower now comes at 7,400 rpm, up from the previous maximum for the S of 6,500 rpm, while the motor now redlines at 7,800 rpm.
     
    The base Carrera actually gets a smaller engine than the previous 911, with a 3.4-liter flat six putting out 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque. That’s a gain of five horsepower and a loss of one pound-foot of torque from the old 3.6-liter unit.
     
    Routing this power to the rear wheels is one of two noteworthy transmissions.
     
    The one getting the most attention is the 991’s base transmission; the world’s first seven-speed manual transmission for a car. Yes, that’s right; just as you were acclimating yourself to rowing through six forward gears, now Porsche has gone and thrown a seventh at you.
     
    But they’ve engineered it for us noobs who might otherwise be worried about mis-shifting, from say, fourth to fifth and accidentally catching that errant seventh gear. A shift lock is in place such that drivers can get to seventh gear only from fifth or sixth.
     
    This seventh gear is really just an overdrive gear with an eye toward efficiency; the first six are for daily driving and drivers hit top speed in sixth gear. Seventh is for freeway or autobahn cruising and the 991’s performance in the final gear demonstrates this as there isn’t a lot of power available.
     
    Also new, for this driver at least, was a start-stop function on a manual transmission. Come to a stoplight, shift the car into neutral and take your foot off the clutch: The engine turns off. Step back on the clutch and the engine fires back up immediately. Cool, but eerie.
     
    If rowing your own gears doesn’t appeal to you, check out Porsche’s optional and improved dual-clutch automatic transmission, known as Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (I think I have his hockey jersey), or PDK.
     
    Both quicker shift times and smoother gear changes are noticeable when compared with the 997’s PDK. Porsche says a new 911 Carrera S with this gearbox and the optional Sport Chrono package will accelerate from 0 to 62 mph in the same 4.1 seconds as the previous 911 S could. After numerous attempts at this in the new 991, 4.1 seconds seems conservative; sub-four second times are entirely possible.
     
    The PDK on the 991 also has a coasting function, similar to that found on Porsche’s Cayenne Hybrid. This system disengages the engine, though the engine stays running, during freeway cruising when no pressure is on the throttle or light pressure is on the brake pedal.
     
    It’s an intelligent system, too, so it monitors the speed with which you pull your foot off the gas; do so quickly and it won’t engage the coast feature because it assumes you’re in the middle of spirited driving. Do so slowly, and the transmission disengages the engine.
     
    If you’re noticing a trend toward efficiency in this 991, that’s no accident. Much of this car was designed with an eye on both European and American fuel economy standards, which are only getting more demanding.
     
    One of the biggest victims in the advancement of the efficiency ethos is the 991’s steering. Previous iterations had a hydraulic steering system that Porsche claimed was the world’s best. If it wasn’t, it certainly was somewhere in the top three. Yet because of the aforementioned and ever-increasing efficiency standards, keeping this fuel-sucking system was never an option.
     
    When I asked one Porsche official about it, he told me on no uncertain terms that the company “had to” switch to a more efficient system, which is an electro-mechanical setup. This will do little to assuage 911 purists who relished the connectivity to the road that the outgoing hydraulic system provided.
     
    But the world kept turning and the 911s kept selling the last time Porsche subverted the devoted in 1997 by introducing the 996 with its water-cooled engine. Such is the price for progress.
     
    On a happier note, the 991 sees some positive changes in the pursuit of efficiency; a lower curb weight. Despite the 991’s larger dimensions and increased features over the 997, a new Carrera S with the PDK transmission shaves almost 90 pounds from its predecessor for a total curb weight of 3,120 pounds. The base Carrera sees similar weight savings. Much of this weight loss comes from the extensive use of aluminum in the doors, roof, and deck lid.
     
    So what kind of driving experience do all these changes add up to? An enjoyable but evolved one.
     
    The 991 is not the 997. The engine note is smoother and more refined, yet just as loud the closer to its redline you push it. The PDK rips off shifts with startling quickness and with the transmission in normal mode, the shifts are nearly seamless. Putting it in Sport (which is now standard on all 991s) or the optional Sport Plus (part of the Sport Chrono package) adds throaty throttle-blipping on the downshifts.
     
    The manual transmission shifter has precise, short throws to it, while the clutch pedal has an encouraging spring to it and engages with short travel. Third gear is deliberately tall and it’s a wonderfully practical place to leave the shifter during tight canyon driving; it has all the torque you need to pull you out of a turn yet the driver can get plenty of speed without needing to shift into fourth.
     
    The wider track and immensely sticky Pirelli P Zero tires (they’re 295/30 ZR20’s in the rear of the Carrera S) provide plenty of grip through turns. Porsche’s first-ever use of active roll stabilization on a 911 (it’s on the Cayenne and Panamera) minimizes, but doesn’t eliminate, body roll.
     
    And then there’s the steering. Swing and a miss. It’s good — cue asterisk the size of Barry Bond’s bald head — for what it is. It’s not the same as the hydraulic setup; it’s too synthetic and it sends too little feedback to the driver’s hands.
     
    If you can overlook the 991’s steering foible (and some won’t), budget $83,050 for the Carrera with the seven-speed manual and $97,350 for the Carrera S, including destination.
     
    The 991 will go on sale in February. Look for a full drive and review then.  Until then, sate your Porsche desires at the company’s booth at the LA Auto Show.
     
    Just make sure you wash your hands before touching...
     

    2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S -- LA Times -- article link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Leawood911:

    regarding the 991 GT3 with PDK. 

    As I recall the PDK could not be used easily with the GT1 Le Mans block (Metzger) which is why we never got PDK in the GT3 or GT2 (but somehow on the Turbo?)

    Since the GT1 derived block will not return on the 991 GT3 I would not bet against PDK being an option - a very popular one.

    It will be interesting how the new GT3 engine compares to the old 997 GT1 block.

    A couple of days ago I had an interesting conversation with the OPC salesman with whom I configured and bought bought both my 997 Turbo and my 997 GT2 from, regarding the upcoming 991 model releases, known options, etc. He stated that the GT3RS 4.0 litre engine will not continue into the 991 Turbo and GT models, so it's going to very interesting to see what happens in the next couple of years, for the engines and transmissions offered as the 991 model range expands.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    This is quite an interesting video. Indicates that the sunroof will be available in Glass rather soon. Also interesting that the rear spoiler extends even further if driving with the sunroof open at a speed above 120km/h. I thought this thing with further extending the rear spoiler only did apply for cars with SPASM -20mm

    On Order: 991 C2S Basalt Black/Black - PDK, PSE, SPASM, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.2 C2S Meteor Grey/Black - PDK, PSE, LSD, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.1 C2S Black/Black - PSE, PCCB, -20mm/LSD, Short-shifter, SportChrono, etc.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Another interesting thing I noticed in this video are the "Black out headlights". Wonder if this also will be an option soon or if it's just the greyish look of PDLS that is shown as black in this rendered model


    --

    On Order: 991 C2S Basalt Black/Black - PDK, PSE, SPASM, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.2 C2S Meteor Grey/Black - PDK, PSE, LSD, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.1 C2S Black/Black - PSE, PCCB, -20mm/LSD, Short-shifter, SportChrono, etc.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    When you order sunroof you will get that further spoiler position that is a standard with PDCC/-20mm option. BUT, with -20mm spoiler extendes further when you use LC or when you choose Sport + mode.

    Little hint... If you order Sport Design package(or even better a Aero package) you will get even better aerodynamics since duckt tail is always in the same position. Also belive it or not you will save some weight since there is no electric motor for the spoiler at the rear. All according to my P source.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Thanks for the valuable info KresoF1! Interesting that it's weight saving. Based on looks only the duck-tale looks heavier than the integrated standard spoiler.

    Do you know what happens if you have -20mm+sunroof (which I have on my order btw devil) and if your car is on idle and you extend the spoiler manually by pushing the button on the center console. Would it extend to the lower position at this point if you have selected Sport mode or Normal mode and if you have engaged Sport+ it will extend even further even at stand still

    Your P-source didn't mention anything about the glass-roof and when this will be available?


    --

    On Order: 991 C2S Basalt Black/Black - PDK, PSE, SPASM, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.2 C2S Meteor Grey/Black - PDK, PSE, LSD, SportChrono, etc.
    Sold: 997.1 C2S Black/Black - PSE, PCCB, -20mm/LSD, Short-shifter, SportChrono, etc.


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    hog:
    Leawood911:

    regarding the 991 GT3 with PDK. 

    As I recall the PDK could not be used easily with the GT1 Le Mans block (Metzger) which is why we never got PDK in the GT3 or GT2 (but somehow on the Turbo?)

    Since the GT1 derived block will not return on the 991 GT3 I would not bet against PDK being an option - a very popular one.

    It will be interesting how the new GT3 engine compares to the old 997 GT1 block.

    A couple of days ago I had an interesting conversation with the OPC salesman with whom I configured and bought bought both my 997 Turbo and my 997 GT2 from, regarding the upcoming 991 model releases, known options, etc. He stated that the GT3RS 4.0 litre engine will not continue into the 991 Turbo and GT models, so it's going to very interesting to see what happens in the next couple of years, for the engines and transmissions offered as the 991 model range expands.

    ...now where could Porsche find a 500bhp high-revving naturally aspirated engine with motorsport heritage for the 991 GT3? Smiley

    Porsche Motorsport Engine -- Video Link

    ...thanks to Porsche and Chris Harris!

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Porsche 911 Carrera S manual review by Autocar...

    Porsche 911 3.8 Carrera S manual (First Drive)

    Test date: 18 November 2011
     
    What is it?
     
    This is the new Porsche 911 Carrera S, tested here with the world’s first manual seven-speed gearbox. The manual is based on the PDK alternative, but has slightly altered ratios in third and seventh to benefit fuel consumption and maintain pulling power in top gear even at relatively low speeds.
     
    Helping you to select the right gear from a crowded gate, a sequential shift lock makes it impossible to select seventh from anything other than fifth or sixth.
     
    Beyond that, this 991 is very much the same as the PDK equivalent – faster than the outgoing car and with a greater top speed, but so much altered that there are several key questions that need answering. Chief among those is whether its new dimensions (56mm longer, 6mm lower, 100mm greater wheelbase, 50mm wider track) and electro-mechanical steering (adopted to save fuel) have messed up the winning formula of previous 911s.
     
    What’s it like?
     
    It’s a grown up version of what’s gone before – and perhaps not quite as fun if you’re an absolute hardcore enthusiast, but otherwise improved in almost every area, and in some of those by quite a significant margin.
     
    Inside, it’s mostly business as normal. The cabin is classy, comfortable and understated. The extra cabin space is welcome, and makes putting a child in the back a more serious possibility than before.
     
    The 3.8-litre engine puts out 394bhp at 7400rpm, up 14bhp, and 324lb ft of torque, up 13lb ft. Coupled to the car loosing 40kg despite its greater size and added equipment, the new flat six delivers a lively performance across a wide rev band.
     
    On the move, refinement has taken a major step forward. Tyre roar and wind noise off the door mirrors are no longer an issue, and engine noise is damped out unless you open up the sports exhaust system or really wind up the revs.
     
    The tall seventh gear makes cruising relaxing, too, a feeling aided by the relatively supple suspension, which absorbs road joints and potholes well, even in the Sports Plus setting. The added wheelbase and wider track undoubtedly help in making the car more stable, too.
     
    The steering lives up to its billing of being “more precise than every other electro-mechanical system on the market” and then some. It imbues the car with a grown-up sense of poise and accuracy, while robbing it of a fraction of that movement and liveliness that was part and parcel of driving a 911 in the past. It takes the 911 in a new direction – but certainly not a bad one. The vast majority of drivers won't even give it a second thought after a while.
     
    The seven-speed manual is more of a technical than practical success. Perhaps the clue is in the fact that Porsche has seen fit to display the gear you are in at the centre of the instrument console; with seven gears to choose from you can both find yourself struggling to be confident with shifts and losing track of what gear you are in. Whisper it, but on a fast twisting road the slick shifting PDK is actually more fun, as its easier to snatch a gear on the corner exit or change down at the last moment, as well as delivering better fuel economy and emissions whatever the conditions.
     
    Should I buy one?
     
    Undoubtedly, yes – although we’d err towards the PDK gearbox, and recommend at least testing both units before committing.
     
    Beyond that, the new 911 is more comfortable, more refined, more stable and supple, faster and frugal than ever before, and the potential downside of the new steering system will go unnoticed by all but the connoisseurs.
     
    -- First drive by Jim Holder for Autocar
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Porsche 911 Carrera S manual
     
    Top speed: 189mph; 0-62mph: 4.5sec; Kerbweight: 1395kg; Engine type, cc: Water-cooled flat-six, 3800cc, direct injection; Power: 394bhp at 7400rpm; Torque: 324lb ft at 5600rpm; Gearbox: 7-spd manual.
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Porsche 911 Carrera S PDK review by Autocar...

    Porsche 911 3.8 Carrera S PDK (First Drive)

    Test date: 10 November 2011
     
    What is it?
     
    The new Porsche 911 Carrera S operates on a much higher performance plane than the seven-year-old model it replaces. With a 0-62mph time of 4.3sec and a top speed of 188mph, the new model storms up the strip 0.2sec faster and extends 2mph beyond the old Carrera S when running an updated version of the seven-speed PDK gearbox.
     
    So, the new 911 is faster than any of its illustrious forebears by some margin. But the question is, can it achieve such feats with the same intensely involving character as the previous six generations of the car?
     
    Make no mistake, the 991 represents the most significant shift in emphasis for the rear-engined coupé ever – more significant than the progression from the air cooled 993 to the water cooled 996 back in 1996.
     
    Seeing the new car reinforces the impression of Porsche’s revolutionary approach. Haunches widened to accommodate all new underpinnings make the styling significantly more curvaceous and terrific attention to detail endows it with greater precision of build. Its stance is more aggressive, too.
     
    It is 56mm longer and, owing to a flatter roof, 11mm lower than the outgoing 997. The really telling measurement, though, is its wheelbase, which for only the second time in the history of the 911 has been extended, by a considerable 100mm. This serves to shorten up the overhangs, providing an increase in interior accommodation.
     
    The Carrera S as driven here is claimed to come in at 1415kg with its optional PDK gearbox – some 40kg under the kerb weight of its predecessor.
     
    What’s it like
     
    Inside, there’s a new dashboard, a high-set centre and contemporary looking switchgear. It’s a classy, modern driving environment but it’s not devoid of classic touches.
     
    The first thing that hits you as you set off is the all round improvement in refinement. Never lacking in this area, it is now considerably quieter than before, with less buffeting around the door mirrors, lower levels of mechanical noise from the rear and, despite those 20-inch tyres, less tyre roar.
     
    Cruising at a steady 80mph in the tall seventh gear, the 911 feels remarkably relaxed. The reworked suspension absorbs transverse joints in the road surface and copes with potholes with greater aplomb than before. With the Porsche Active Stability Management PASM in Normal mode the chassis takes on a new-found calmness. Switching the PASM into Sport instantly heightens the responses – not only in terms of damping firmness but the directness of the steering and sensitivity of the throttle, too.
     
    But there is still less initial impact harshness than with the previous 911, something that makes Sport mode more suitable over a wider range of road surfaces, and body movements are wonderfully controlled.
     
    A big surprise are the unfamiliarly subtle messages – or is the lack of them – being relayed back from the newly designed steering wheel. Over the years we’ve become accustomed to the joggling inherent in all 911s up until now. Anyone who has driven one will know what I mean. This inherent on centre movement of the steering wheel at the straight ahead, a measure of liveliness and feedback many consider part and parceled of the driving experience, has been eliminated entirely through the adoption of a new electro-mechanical steering system.
     
    It is certainly a big change in character, making the car feel almost anaesthetized on first acquaintance – if only because it’s so unfamiliar to drive a 911 whose steering wheel does not constantly fidget, even at moderate speeds. But it seems the further you drive the more you come to appreciate the added calmness through the steering wheel.
     
    Despite holding on to what is essentially the same engine as the old model, Porsche has held true to 911 tradition by raising the output. Power climbs by 14bhp to a new peak of 394bhp at 7400rpm, in the process taking its specific output beyond 100bhp per litre. Torque also improves by 13lb ft to 234lb ft at 5600rpm. With the drop in weight figured in, the bump in reserves provides for a 16bhp per tonne increase in the vital power-to-weight ratio at 282bhp per tonne.
     
    Unlike the engine, the gearbox the new 911 Carrera S uses is all new – and rather special, too. Replacing the old six-speed manual is the first ever seven-speed manual to make its way into a series production road car. Based around the seven-speed PDK gearbox, the ground-breaking manual uses a mechanical lock-out to stop you from inadvertently shifting into seventh. The new top gear can only be selected via fifth or sixth.
     
    Another interesting development is a so-called sailing function, which sees the engine disconnected from the gearbox via the clutch on periods of trailing throttle, allowing it roll freely at idle on slight downhill grades.
     
    The detail changes Porsche has made to the engine give the new Carrera S a gutsier feel across a wider range of revs; it might lack the sheer intensity of some of the engines used by its supercar rivals, but the evergreen flat six remains as stirring as ever.
    Rushing up to a tightening right hander, the 911 squats ever so slightly over the rear wheels, its engine howling with an intoxicating combination of induction and exhaust clamor. The front end is uncharacteristically calm with no unruly bobbing across the heavily patchworked surface; the changes to the suspension provide the new 911 with a much more settled feel even in the most aggressive Sport Plus mode.
     
    Should I buy one?
     
    The 991 is not only more capable than the 997, but its handling also hints at greatness. In Carrera S form it is faster, more neutral at the limit, considerably more stable, incredibly comfortable, a lot quieter at motorway speeds and amazingly frugal. At the end of the day, I’d even come to terms with the new steering, accepting that it lacks the ultimate precision and sensitivity of the old hydraulic arrangement.
     
    The question I’m asking myself now is: how can Porsche possibly top it? For the moment, the original supercar has reached a new zenith – both in ability and desirability.
     
    -- First drive by Greg Kable for Autocar
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Porsche 911 Carrera S PDK
     
    Top speed: 188mph; 0-62mph: 4.1sec; Weight: 1415kg; Engine layout: 6cyls, horizontally opposed, 3800cc, petrol; Installation: rear, longitudinal; Power: 394bhp at 7400rpm; Torque: 234lb ft at 5600rpm; Specific output: 104bhp/litre; Power to weight: 282bhp/tonne; Gearbox: seven speed double clutch
     
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Cool, thanks for posting.

     

     


    --

    "I don't mean to brag, but I am really good at self-deprecation."


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Porsche 991 dealer launch (Cape Town)

     

     

    wink


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    I can't remember seeing better score lately for any other car...

    http://www.topgear.com/uk/porsche/911/verdict

    :)

    ''911 is a masterpiece, but so it bloody should be. They’ve been fiddling with it for 50 years...''


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    hog:
    Leawood911:

    It will be interesting how the new GT3 engine compares to the old 997 GT1 block.

    A couple of days ago I had an interesting conversation with the OPC salesman with whom I configured and bought bought both my 997 Turbo and my 997 GT2 from, regarding the upcoming 991 model releases, known options, etc. He stated that the GT3RS 4.0 litre engine will not continue into the 991 Turbo and GT models, so it's going to very interesting to see what happens in the next couple of years, for the engines and transmissions offered as the 991 model range expands.

    ...now where could Porsche find a 500bhp high-revving naturally aspirated engine with motorsport heritage for the 991 GT3? Smiley

     

    Perhaps this - i.e. the engine from the RS Spyder - is what Wolfgang Hatz had in mind when he said "a flat-eight will fit" (see the Car & Driver interview posted a few pages back).  Would be a very interesting development. Smiley


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    Fascinating conclusion from Car Magazine

    Verdict

    It’s more refined, more comfortable, and more economical than ever before, but what really matters is that it still has that unique 911 feel and character. The outgoing Carrera GTS is more interactive and involving, but this new Porsche 911 isn’t far behind – while offering up a much broader range of talents to a bigger audience.

    http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/Drives/Search-Results/First-drives/Porsche-911-Carrera-S-2012-CAR-review/

     

     


    --

    Gen II Cayman S


    Re: Ladies and gentlemen, the new 991...

    GR:

    Fascinating conclusion from Car Magazine

    Verdict

    It’s more refined, more comfortable, and more economical than ever before, but what really matters is that it still has that unique 911 feel and character. The outgoing Carrera GTS is more interactive and involving, but this new Porsche 911 isn’t far behind – while offering up a much broader range of talents to a bigger audience.

    I think this is the operative phrase as far as PAG are concerned.

    Otherwise, they could have kept the 997.2 in GTS guise for another 7-8 years, as there is nothing wrong with it as a sportscar, really. The days when Porsche could afford to keep the 3.0 SC/Carrera 3.2 practically unchanged from 1974 to 1989 and sell nevertheless, are over as the market is much more demanding nowadays.


    --

    "Form follows function"


     
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