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    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Well guys at some point even a second faster will be impossible... I am sure this car will be fast enough at 7:22 lol

    The technology and experience is much more valuable and measurable by the owners. Think great reliability, daily drivability (front lift) and insane tight and sporty.. those exhaust right behind the head of the passengers angel All Form-follows-function as the exhaust system is put far away from the heavy battery equipment! This is Porsche at its best!


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Hi Atz,

    I agree that there is somewhere a limit where you cant go faster..already getting below 7:30 is very difficult. No problem with that .and thats common techncial understanding...but its Porsche itself that always proclaims "-14sec for 991 vs 997".."-17sec. for 981vs987"..

    However I disagree there are (besides some collectors) enough supercar fans/people willing to pay 800,000€ for inferior performance than a GT2RS..

    Its no longer a supercar then..yes it will be the first "ecological supercar"..but you remember that most of the supercar owners are like "little children" ..and dont care much about CO2..


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Well, I guess another function of the 918 will be a top-model to introduce certain features, which can then be introduced into the "lesser" models, claiming it to be "derived from the supercar".

    So, by creating a supercar that has technology that nobody would want on a normal 911, they create the future possibility to introduce a hybrid 911...

    Having said that, I guess that the 918 will have performance (read: nbr time) equal to or slightly better than the CGT.


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    I think ( hope )  918  will be the first  >> http://www.spannerhead.com/2012/02/13/koenigseggs-new-cam-less-engine/


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Porshe are using a camshaft, there is a pic of it, how it work on the other hand I have no idea, and would love if someone could explain.


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    GM Austin:

    I guess there has been a design change.  See this from Auto Express:

    It’s immediately clear that significant alterations have been made since the 918 was revealed. For starters, there’s been a complete rethink on the electric motors acting on the front wheels. Instead of two, there’s now a single 80kW motor powering both wheels via a single-speed transfer gearbox.

    Read more:http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/news/autoexpressnews/280651/porsche_918_spyder_exclusive.html#ixzz1pqr9Y2aK

    So, ....... Inquiring minds want to know; How do they achieve torque vectoring?

    Not by individual front brake activation I hope Smiley


    --

    Mike

    Carrera GT + Tesla Roadster 1.5 + Panamera Turbo +  BMW Z8 + BMW 3.0 CSi + Bentley Arnage T + GT3 RS 4.0


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    I am probably way out of the loop. But I thought that the 918 was going to imply the KERS flywheel regenerative system that Porsche is developing with Williams for the GT-R Hybrid.  Is that not the case for the 918?


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    bhnyc:

    I am probably way out of the loop. But I thought that the 918 was going to imply the KERS flywheel regenerative system that Porsche is developing with Williams for the GT-R Hybrid.  Is that not the case for the 918?

    No.  It's batteries instead of the flywheel.


    --

    Mike

    Carrera GT + Tesla Roadster 1.5 + Panamera Turbo +  BMW Z8 + BMW 3.0 CSi + Bentley Arnage T + GT3 RS 4.0


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    bhnyc:

    I am probably way out of the loop. But I thought that the 918 was going to imply the KERS flywheel regenerative system that Porsche is developing with Williams for the GT-R Hybrid.  Is that not the case for the 918?

    Flywheel is good for racing (many quick charging and discharging cycles) and batteries are good for road (more energy storage )


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Also, I think that it is quite undesirable to have a high velocity spinning mass on a car for the public. If that thing breaks, it will make mince meat of the occupants...
    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    thanks - seems like the new McClaren (F1 replacement) will have a flywheel on board.  not sure how and where it will sit.  I am wracking my brain, as I recently read another car which will deploy the keys system (maybe it was Enzo) not sure.  

    i understand the flywheel would not be as productive without the intensity of track driving, but it will be interesting to see who, if any, put it into a road, if they do, how will they package it and what will it weigh


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    I be interested to see how they reduce the noise from a fly wheel spinning at 40,000 rpms.


    --

    2006 997 C2S Cab, Triple Black,  2006 Cayenne Titanium Iceland Silver Metalic New York


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    u get the latest Bose Noise Cancel headphone plugged in behind yr head-rest imitating the sound of the engine while being on Eco mode...


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    cannot wait, but nice footage though: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2il6_hDM6U&feature=related


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Great video! The camera at 8:17 even shows the rear-wheel steering.


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    The May 2012 issue of Automobile magazine has an article by Georg Kacher that continues on the theme from the 918 press event at Nardo.  Georg can be seen in the video posted by pxaxh above.  Georg is the tall (6'7") guy with the pony tail seen towering above everyone else.

    The article mentions that the 918 will use the same 265/35-YR19 and 335/20-YR20 tire sizes from the Carrera GT.  The development wheels can be seen on the black CGT in the Nardo film.  They are silver while the same ones in black are seen on the 918.

    If true, this is exciting to Carrera GT owners because a very weak link in purchasing limited volume Porsche super cars is the poor situation with ongoing tire support.  Super cars don't perform their best on tires with production dates 5 years before they are sold as "new" tires via their dealer system.  It is quite off-putting to have only seriously "aged" rubber to take to a track event.

    Does anyone know what differences there might be in the new "N2" version of the Pilot Sport Michelin CGT tires now being sold by Tire Rack?

    My dealer says they are aware of no differences from the "N0" version originally supplied on the car.  Their best information is that Michelin Super Sport tires are the best option for replacement CGT tires.

    Anybody have better information?


    --

    Mike

    Carrera GT + Tesla Roadster 1.5 + Panamera Turbo +  BMW Z8 + BMW 3.0 CSi + Bentley Arnage T + GT3 RS 4.0


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Has anyone got any idea when the actual car test mules will start to appear?


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    I seem to recall reading somewhere that the next meeting with journalists will be in about 6 months time. I presume that the actual mule will be available by then.


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    W8MM:

    The May 2012 issue of Automobile magazine has an article by Georg Kacher that continues on the theme from the 918 press event at Nardo.  Georg can be seen in the video posted by pxaxh above.  Georg is the tall (6'7") guy with the pony tail seen towering above everyone else.

    The article mentions that the 918 will use the same 265/35-YR19 and 335/20-YR20 tire sizes from the Carrera GT.  The development wheels can be seen on the black CGT in the Nardo film.  They are silver while the same ones in black are seen on the 918.

    If true, this is exciting to Carrera GT owners because a very weak link in purchasing limited volume Porsche super cars is the poor situation with ongoing tire support.  Super cars don't perform their best on tires with production dates 5 years before they are sold as "new" tires via their dealer system.  It is quite off-putting to have only seriously "aged" rubber to take to a track event.

    Does anyone know what differences there might be in the new "N2" version of the Pilot Sport Michelin CGT tires now being sold by Tire Rack?

    My dealer says they are aware of no differences from the "N0" version originally supplied on the car.  Their best information is that Michelin Super Sport tires are the best option for replacement CGT tires.

    Anybody have better information?


    --

    Mike

    Carrera GT + Tesla Roadster 1.5 + Panamera Turbo +  BMW Z8 + BMW 3.0 CSi + Bentley Arnage T + GT3 RS 4.0

     I have the Supersports on my GT and they are fabulous.

    A friend of mine has the N2 on his and is also very happy. You dearler is wrong, N2 means it is the third evolution of the tyre for the GT and as a matter of fact the current one.

    I don't know about the US but they are available thru your official dealer here in Europe.

    The Supersport is a superior tyre as far as performance is concerned but is not N-rated.

     


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    pxaxh:

    cannot wait, but nice footage though:

    Porsche 918 Spyder Nardo Footage

    Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2il6_hDM6U

    Nice video footage from Nardo!

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Riding Shotgun in the 2014 Porsche 918 Hybrid

     
    Is This Plug-In Hybrid the Future of Sports Cars?
     
    (19 March 2012)
     
    We arrive at Nardo at daybreak. We barely slept an hour last night out of nervous anticipation for what comes today: a ride in a 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder prototype, the only one in the world. It's still winter in the heel of Italy, but the air is warm and there's a blue sky overhead. This is good news, because multimillion-dollar development prototypes and rain don't mix.
     
    A Volkswagen Multivan deposits us at the remote test track where we find a gaggle of Porsche engineers at work, surrounded by all sorts of data-logging equipment. And there, in the middle of it all, is the 918.
     
    The first ever Porsche 918 Spyder to run under its own means is nothing more than a rolling chassis pieced together so engineers can test its gasoline-electric hybrid drivetrain. Partly covered in modified Porsche 911 body panels and flaunting outrageous exhaust pipes that sprout up from the engine bay at the rear (a feature we're assured will be retained for production), it is a long way from the 918 Spyder concept that basked in the spotlight at the 2010 Geneva Auto Show.
     
    Will Look Like the Concept Eventually
     
    "The production version will be very similar to the concept car in overall appearance," Frank Walliser, chief engineer for the 918 program, assures us. "There will be some changes, like these tailpipes. This is really just a systems mule that we're using to sort the various gasoline-electric hybrid components and its electronics package before we begin construction of road-going prototypes back in Weissach (Porsche's research and development center in Germany)."
     
    You should know the Porsche 918 Spyder by now. Mere months after its unveiling, Porsche confirmed it would put the targa-roofed supercar into production as a successor to the celebrated Carrera GT, starting on September 18, 2013. Just 918 examples are planned, each running down a dedicated line that is being established in a former paint shop at the carmaker's Zuffenhausen headquarters in Germany. It is the same factory that builds the latest Boxster and 911 — a holy grail to true Porsche fans, no less.
     
    Waking Up the Engine
     
    The Porsche engineers make some adjustments to the prototype's electronics, which are housed in a makeshift aluminum box strapped to an area that will eventually be occupied by the production car's rear spoiler. Walliser's boss, Wolfgang Hatz, Porsche's chief of research and development, slides down into the driver seat and twists a key in the left-hand-mounted ignition. Odd whirring sounds rise up from underneath before the gasoline engine catches and fills the garage with a deep pulsating blare of exhaust from those prominent tailpipes.
     
    The centerpiece of the new Porsche is its mid-rear-mounted V8 gasoline engine, seated on traditional rubber mounts (rather than the hydraulic mounts used on the 911) within a carbon-fiber cradle that is attached to the back of the main tub by six prominent mounting points. Similar to the 90-degree V8 used in the Porsche RS Spyder successfully campaigned in the American Le Mans series between 2005 and 2008, the engine has gained 1.2 liters of displacement, going from 3.4 liters in race trim up to 4.6 liters in this application.
     
    Walliser describes the engine as "entirely new," noting that it features an all-new crankcase, cylinder head design and low-reciprocating-mass internals, plus that radical exhaust system that sees two pipes exit just behind the integral carbon-fiber roll hoops. The point of this arrangement is to keep hot exhaust gases well away from the car's heat-sensitive battery pack mounted down low directly behind the tub.
     
    Let's Talk About the Numbers
     
    The revamped V8 has been tuned to rev to a dizzying 9,200 rpm (though in its current state of tune, it has a lower redline), and owing to its racing gene, Walliser promises it will deliver the same razor-sharp throttle response as the Carrera GT's 5.7-liter V10. Porsche engineers tell us the V8 makes about 562 horsepower.
     
    But the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder is a hybrid, remember, so it also has a pair of synchronous electric motors — one mounted up front acting exclusively on the front wheels with 107 hp, and a second, 121-hp motor attached to the rear of the gasoline engine providing drive to the rear wheels. We're told total system power will be in the neighborhood of 759 hp, with 568 pound-feet of torque.
     
    Barely containing his delight at finally getting to show off the 918 Spyder to someone other than an engineer, Hatz gingerly guides the prototype out of the garage. After prodding the throttle a couple times to release some heat into the engine and its peripheries, he speeds off into the distance. We scramble back into the Multivan and catch up with the prototype at the end of an immense test track. The engineering team has spent the last 10 days here methodically running through the first systems test of the new car.
     
    How It All Works
     
    Like the Cayenne and Panamera hybrids, the 918 is a parallel hybrid, but its electric motors are obviously a lot more powerful and its battery pack is bigger (Porsche hasn't released a kWh capacity rating, but we know there are 312 lithium-ion cells rated at a maximum 202 kilowatts). The Spyder can be operated in either all-gasoline or all-electric mode, or when added performance is called for, a combination of both. In electric mode, it has a claimed range of 16 miles at speeds up to 93 mph.
     
    Electric energy for the battery pack is collected on the overrun and during braking via a recuperation system claimed to operate up to three times more efficiently than the setup on the Cayenne and Panamera. You'll also be able to plug this car in, with an anticipated recharge time between 2 and 6 hours, depending on the available voltage.
     
    Depending on which engine and/or motor combination is in use, the 918 Spyder is either rear-drive or all-wheel drive. The front electric motor runs a direct-drive unit, and an electronic torque-vectoring function apportions torque between the front wheels to benefit handling. The Porsche engineers tell us that drive to the front wheels is disengaged at 146 mph to improve high-speed stability.
     
    Meanwhile, the gasoline V8 and rear electric motor are mated to Porsche's seven-speed, dual-clutch automated manual PDK transmission, which drives the rear wheels with the help of a torque-vectoring system and mechanical locking differential.
     
    Finally, It's Our Turn
     
    Hatz folds himself in two and uneasily steps out of the precious prototype wearing the biggest smile you've ever seen and, after some data-logging equipment is wired to various VGA sockets, diminutive Porsche test driver Holger Bartels takes his place behind the wheel. We're then asked if we'd like to be the first of a small group of media to ride in the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder. We're halfway into the cabin, tripping over the wide sill, before we remember to answer.
     
    It's snug, dark, and frankly a complete mess in the 918 prototype. Although the production car is set to receive a removable roof panel, the prototype sports a fixed structure. There's a three-spoke steering wheel from the 911, instrument pack from the Boxster and a stubby, cast-aluminum gear selector, along a sea of blue wires in front of our seat, which is borrowed from the 911 GT3. There's an 18.5-gallon gas tank mounted behind our seat. Almost apologetically, Bartels tells us this will all change by the time the new car reaches production. For now, it's one hell of an office.
     
    Unaware the 918 Spyder had been idling in electric mode, we're suddenly whisked away from standstill with only the remote whirring of electric motors. Acceleration is stronger than we'd expected given the prototype's crude build. There's real shove and, as all sort of figures turn over on Bartels' monitor, a proper sensation of speed as grit from the road surface is picked up by the tires and fired into the wheelwells.
     
    Beside us, Bartels points the prototype down a long straight. We accelerate beyond the 93-mph all-electric limit, and the gasoline engine booms to life. There's still a lot of tuning work to be done, but the free-revving V8 instantly provides an added dimension to the performance — both in terms of outright pace and aural attributes.
     
    This car will offer five driving modes. There's "e power" for all-electric operation, a "hybrid" mode that allows either electric or gasoline operation, followed by "sport hybrid," which is the first of three performance-oriented gasoline-electric modes. Beyond that, "race hybrid" calls up even further levels of performance, while "hot lap" unleashes all the battery's remaining power for short periods of what Walliser describes as overboost.
     
    How Quick Is It? 
     
    Nothing is official just yet, but Porsche is aiming for a curb weight around 1,700 kg (3,747 pounds), with 0-62-mph acceleration in less than 3 seconds.
     
    Officials also hint at a 0-124-mph time of less than 9 seconds and zero to 186 mph in less than 27 seconds — quicker than the Carrera GT. Top speed, achieved with the help of a series of active aerodynamic functions including diffuser elements behind the front wheels and a multistage rear wing that extends to a maximum height of 4.7 inches, is pegged at 202 mph.
     
    Still, there's more to this latest Porsche supercar than straight-line speed. Walliser also claims the production version will be capable of returning 78 mpg combined on the European test cycle. It's a headlining figure, of course, achieved primarily on electric drive. But even when driven for performance, the 918 Spyder will be capable of returning more than 30 mpg, we're told.
     
    With a deft flick of the left-hand-side shift paddle, Bartels drops down to 5th gear, then 4th, and then he just stands on the brakes — which include giant 16.1-inch front carbon-ceramic discs and 15.4-inch discs in back. Still going hard, he turns into a tightening 180-degree bend and drops down again to 3rd before unleashing a combination of gasoline and electric power mid-bend. We're sideways. Bartels, still looking calm, winds on a touch of opposite lock and we fire back in the direction we have just come from, up into 4th, 5th and 6th gear, the hard blare of the gasoline engine combining with the whirring of the electric motors.
     
    What About the Chassis? 
     
    The 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder prototype rides on a unique chassis made almost entirely from cast-aluminum components. The suspension is a combination of double wishbones at the front and a multilink setup in back, but unlike the system on the Carrera GT, which used a racecarlike pushrod system attached to the unit-body, the 918 has conventional springs and dampers sited outboard near the center-lock-style wheels, which measure 20 inches up front and 21 inches in the rear and are wrapped in 265/35R20 and 325/35R21 Michelin Pilot Sport Cup rubber.
     
    It is all attached to the car's ultra-stiff carbon-fiber structure manufactured by Austrian company CarboTech via solid metal mounts. The dampers are adaptive, altering between comfort and sport modes at the push of a button on the center console in line with the PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) already offered on each and every Porsche model these days. To ease entry into suburban driveways and avoid expensive underbody scrapes on parking lot ramps, the front end offers 1.2 inches of ride height adjustment.
     
    As on the latest 911 and Boxster, the steering uses electric power assist and automatically corrects steering lock to compensate for factors such as stiff side winds. It also provides a small degree of steering angle to the rear wheels, reducing the turning circle at lower speeds.
     
    A Work in Progress
     
    Despite the rough look of this prototype, it rides well on Nardo's smooth asphalt. As we rush up on a fast right-hander, we expect Bartels to back off. But he keeps on it, clearly confident of the car's dynamic properties. There's very little lean, hinting at a low center of gravity, and loads of purchase from the tires.
     
    Walliser tells us computer simulations suggest the production car will be capable of generating up to a 1.4g on the skid pad (though that's a maximum figure, rather than the average lateral acceleration we customarily report). He also drops a Nurburgring claim: Porsche is targeting 7 minutes, 22 seconds on the Nordschleife — still well short of the Dodge Viper's 7:12, but moving nonetheless.
     
    Even in early prototype form, the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder is hugely impressive. There's still a long way to go — another 18 months of intensive development, no less. But as our ride comes to an end, we're struck by just how far Porsche's engineering team has come during just 10 days of development work on the rolling chassis.
     
    In the next phase, Porsche will build 23 road-going prototypes. Stay tuned.
     
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

     the center-lock-style wheels, which measure 20 inches up front and 21 inches in the rear and are wrapped in 265/35R20 and 325/35R21 Michelin Pilot Sport Cup rubber.

     
    This contradicts Georg's tire dimensions with a 1 inch increase in diameter.  Too bad for CGT fitment Smiley
     
    Tire technology improvements are thought to be a big part of the stunning performance increases of the latest Porsche cars.  Oh that the same were available for older cars.

    --

    Mike

    Carrera GT + Tesla Roadster 1.5 + Panamera Turbo +  BMW Z8 + BMW 3.0 CSi + Bentley Arnage T + GT3 RS 4.0


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Porsche 918 Spyder First Ride by Motor Trend...

    (19 March 2012)

    "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth." John F. Kennedy was sticking his neck out a long way in May 1961. It was still some nine months before John Glenn had even orbited the earth. There's that sort of bold aspiration in Porsche's announcement that production of the first of the 918 examples of the 918 Spyder will begin on 9/18/2013. They said that before they'd ever had a prototype running. And this is no ordinarily predictable project. It's the most technically ambitious sports car ever.
     
    It's a hyper-performance two-seater with an all-wheel-drive plug-in hybrid drivetrain. It shares barely a single component with any other vehicle. But if you think that gives grounds for uncertainty, you just don't think like a Porsche engineer thinks. The company decided to build a concept-car only in September 2009; it was unveiled at Geneva in March 2010. But that really was just a show-pony, not an engineered package. Feasibility studies were undertaken that summer, so the production green light occurred a scant three years before job one. In an industry where it usually takes two years just to perform a mid-cycle facelift, the 918 Spyder represents engineering at lightning speed.
     
    Yet here I am at the Nardo high-speed test track in southern Italy standing by the 918 Spyder test car, and precision engineering might not be the first phrase to come to mind. It's mostly un-bodied, and even where there are panels they have several-inch gaps between them. Everywhere you look it's duct tape, cable ties, crooked screw heads and unintelligible German scribbles. Exposed pipes and wires untidily snake all over the place. The cockpit is near uninhabitable; you share it with any number of temporary controls, data acquisition equipment and a noodle-salad of cabling.
     
    Don't be deceived. This is the very first rolling chassis. It's only seven weeks old when I ride in it. That's in itself an astounding fact: a major manufacturer letting an outsider experience a car so early in its development journey. This vehicle contains all the major production-intent systems. These systems are bewilderingly exotic in themselves, but they don't just need to work as standalone pieces. Obviously they will need to integrate with each other under the command of 55 electronic controllers. The prime mover is a bespoke 4.6-liter V-8, with flat-plane crank and titanium connecting rods. It's derived in principle from the V-8 in the RS Spyder ALMS racer, but no parts are shared. It revs to 9000 rpm, an astonishing figure in isolation but even more so when you consider it has direct injection. The engine weighs just 290 pounds, a scant 25 pounds more than the race engine, even though it's rated to pass all Porsche's road-car durability tests. It makes 570 horsepower -- wildly impressive for just 4.6-liters, and a better power-to-displacement number than the 5.7-liter V-10 found in the 604 hp Carrera GT. Still though, Porsche's old super-duper car made more power, right? Not quite.
     
    We haven't yet talked about the 918 Spyder's the two electric motors. The one at the back, between engine and transmission, makes 90kW (121 hp), and the one for the font wheels is 80kW (107 hp). These numbers are provisional; they might rise some more. Porsche R&D chief Wolfgang Hatz isn't shy of talking about a final total system power north of 800 horsepower.
     
    The rear powertrain consists of the V-8, and behind it a decoupling clutch, then the e-motor, then a seven-speed PDK twin-clutch transmission. The decoupler aft of the V-8 means it can be shut down permanently for the driver-selectable electric-only mode, and temporarily for the hybrid mode. So the rear electric-motor drives through the seven-speed box and can operate at all road speeds up to the 202mph top-end. The front motor runs a single reduction ratio and is decoupled at 146mph to avoid over-revving. In pure-electric-mode, the 918 Spyder can pull 0-60s in about 9 seconds, and thanks to its 6.8kWh battery capacity should go about 15 miles if you drive like the man from the EPA.
     
    But you don't drive like that, do you? So for you there will be a little rotary knob on the steering wheel. Turn it out of e-mode, through hybrid mode and into sport mode. Now the V-8 is permanently clutched in, which should do away with worries about system lag when you mash the gas. It also means permanent exposure to its ear-tingling cadenzas: the exhaust system is packaged inside and above the V, and the two pipes fire obliquely backwards like anti-aircraft guns, from a position just less than two feet behind your ears. Where you see them on this mule is where they will be in real life. In this position, their heat is easily vented, rather than soaking into the engine bay and towards the battery.
     
    Another twist of the dial and you're in race mode. All systems are set to maximum, and the battery will cycle deeper. In two-second bursts the electric motors alone will make 260 hp -- the same total amount as a 1974 911 Turbo. And the output power of the electrical systems means they have huge input power too: the system can generate 0.5g worth of deceleration via regenerative braking. That means more electrical energy is available next time the car accelerates. Zero to sixty should fall under 3 seconds flat -- in fact Porsche claims 0-100 km/h will be under 3.0, and it always claims conservatively. More fantastically, 0-125 mph should happen in less than nine seconds, and 0-186 mph (300km/h) in under 27. Those are hypercar figures boys and girls.
     
    The car comes to rest beside me, and I'm invited to the passenger seat. Strangely, the engine is running. I guess, and my engineer-driver confirms, that because they are doing a lot of electric-only acceleration runs today, they're using every chance to keep the battery topped up via the gas engine -- this is a hack mode exactly similar to what Chevy did with the Volt on press outings, and not normal for the production car. So when I'm strapped in, the V-8 cuts out, and we bowl up the straightaway, eventually getting to about 60 mph before he lifts off. Turns out the electrical systems are running at about half power today and 0-60 mph takes longer than the 9 seconds they're claiming for full electric. Also, with no gas beng consumed, the e-mode 918 should do 90+ mph "flat out". In gentle electric acceleration from rest, it's the front motor that does the driving, because the single-speed front gearbox has less friction than the 7-speed PDK at the rear. Yes, a FWD Porsche. At certain times, anyway.
     
    We swing around and return. This time the V-8 kicks in, and hard. The driver pulls the upshift paddle every time it gets to 6000 rpm, by which time it's beginning to sound pretty darned Le Mans. Then instead of going back to the pit, he peels off to the right, down another wide runway, and takes the chance to saw the wheel left and right repeatedly. The lateral forces pull my five-point harness like a heavy bear is running on my chest.
     
    The 918 has to handle properly. Has to: Porsche has given itself a public target 7 minute 22 second Nordschleife time, so to miss it would be (as the kiddies say) an epic fail. To achieve it, there's a 'hot lap' mode that allows the battery to end the lap more depleted than it starts. That's 10 seconds quicker than the Carrera GT. Well, in the workshop where this prototype lives, I also saw a Carrera GT crudely modified to use the suspension geometry, tires and dampers of the 918, and with ballast weights to simulate the new car too. Sad to see this lovely car brutalized, but at least it's for a good reason. I spoke to several chassis engineers and they all admit now (as does Walter Rohrl) that the Carrera GT was evil on the limit. This simulator has a higher but friendlier outer edge. And that's without the front-axle drive that will further stabilize the final, production 918 Spyder.
     
    The dynamics engineers had clear priorities for the packaging guys: low weight, and weight mounted low. That's difficult when there were 700 pounds of hybrid gubbins to include. But they have kept it under 3750 pounds, all-in. The V-8 is dry-sumped and is mounted almost entirely below the center-height of the wheels. The PDK is upside-down from the usual orientation (and so has a bespoke casing as well as almost all-new internal parts versus Porsche's other units), and the battery is behind the occupants' buttocks. Increased efficiency allows the fuel tank to be 18.5 gallons versus 23.8 in the Carrera GT, and it's mounted low, too.
     
    The electronic stability system will not only be able to call on the front wheels to keep the car pointing where you ask: it also commands rear-wheel steering. That's right, all-wheel steering. It's normally programmed to counter-steer at low speed for agility, and work in phase with the front wheels at speed for stability. Active dampers are standard too, and carbon-ceramic brakes of course.
     
    By a margin of 0.05 of an inch over the Cayenne, the 918 Spyder is the widest car Porsche makes, at 76.4 in, with a length of 182.8 in. It's by far Porsche's lowest, at 45.9 in -- the driver sits even lower than in the Carrera GT. That helps it roll so very little and grip so hard. The space taken up by the hybrid equipment means the 918 doesn't have space for Carrera GT-type inboard pushrod-operated springs and dampers, and anyway they were deemed too heavy. The next phase of prototypes, which were being built while I rode in the rolling chassis, will have the production car's active aerodynamics. The system comprises a four-position rear wing, an active front diffuser, an active underfloor flap, and an active radiator flap. Acting under central control, these allow drag, downforce and cooling to be tuned as needed, in real time.
     
    It will be a habitable car, not too stripped of comfort. The twin carbon fiber roof panels will fit in the front trunk. There will be an 11-speaker sound system. All the instruments will be part of a reconfigurable TFT screen. A new touch-screen navigation/entertainment/connectivity system is being designed for the center console. Air conditioning will be standard, and an electric cabin heater an option. So will be a nose lifter for steep car park ramps. Porsche knows its buyers: another option is to be a 'track pack' of lighter wheels (magnesium: minus 26 pounds) and even lower, stiffer suspension, plus further weight-cutting measures. A high proportion of the buyers are likely to use the car on-track, the engineers all say.
     
    Ah, the buyers. I can't with much ease climb inside the minds of people who drop a million bucks on a supercar. Well, 768,000 Euros at any rate. But I voiced my guess what some of those potential richies would holler: chuck away the hybrid nonsense and give us an ultra-light racetrack murdering double hyper car. It turns out that about half do indeed say that, at least when they first express an interest in the car. But the sales technique is simple. They're just strapped into the passenger seat of one of Porsche's experimental four-wheel-drive electric Boxsters, and the accelerator is floored. Apparently they soon come to see the appeal of a powerful electric motor or two. Whether they want the highest-tech supercar around, the highest-efficiency or simply the highest-performance, the 918 Spyder is on course to have all the bases covered.
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Right Side
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Front
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Front Three Quarter
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Right Side Door Open
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Front Three Quarter On Track
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Passenger Cell
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Seat Molds
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Engine
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Left Side
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Front On Track
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Electric Motor
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Head
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Connecting Rod
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Engine Block
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Camshaft
     
     
    Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Crankshaft
     
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Porsche 918 Spyder: The Most Technically Ambitious Supercar Ever?

    "Motor Trend heads to Italy's Nardo test track to get under the skin of Porsche's very first rolling chassis 918 Spyder prototype..."

    Porsche 918 Spyder: The Most Technically Ambitious Supercar Ever -- Motor Trend -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Porsche 918 Spyder evolution meets emotion...

    The future is taking shape: with more than half of its development time completed, the Porsche 918 Spyder is firmly on course to become the super sports car of tomorrow. As a plug-in hybrid vehicle, it logically combines a high-performance combustion engine with cutting-edge electric motors to deliver performance that is beyond extraordinary: the best of both worlds endows the 918 with the dynamics of a racing car packing more than 770 hp of power accompanied by fuel consumption, which at approximately three liters per 100 kilometers, is less than that of most modern compact cars. Moreover, Porsche is breaking yet more new ground with the technology demonstrator with spectacular solutions such as the full carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) body, fully adaptive aerodynamics, adaptive rear-axle steering and the upward-venting “top pipes” exhaust system. In the process, the 918 Spyder is offering a glimpse of what Porsche Intelligent Performance may be capable of in future.
     
     
    The 918 Spyder has been designed as a super sports car and the legitimate successor to the Carrera GT. As such, the first goal was obvious: improving yet again on the Carrera GT’s performance. As far as is currently known, the 918 Spyder will be significantly faster both in terms of acceleration and also performance on the racing circuit: less than three seconds from zero to 100 km/h (Carrera GT: 3.9 seconds) and less than 7:22 minutes on the Nürburgring Nordschleife (Carrera GT: 7:32 minutes) is an unmistakable statement. However, the uniqueness of the 918 Spyder is best represented by the union of outstanding performance with a level of efficiency never seen before in the super sports car sector. Fuel consumption of approximately three liters per 100 kilometers and an electric range in excess of 25 kilometers are unprecedented.
     
    From comfortable to ready to race: five modes for three motors
     
    The core of the 918 Spyder concept is the distribution of propulsive power across three power units, collaboration between which is controlled by an intelligent management system using five pre-selectable modes. This operating strategy is a core competency of the 918 Spyder. It takes the best possible account of the different requirements between an efficiency-orientated driving profile on the one hand and maximum performance on the other. In order to make the best possible use of these different approaches, the Porsche developers defined a total of five operating modes that can be activated via a “map switch” in the steering wheel, just like in motor sports cars.
     
    Quiet and elegant: “E-Power”
     
    When the vehicle is started up, the “E-Power” mode is the default operating mode as long as the battery is sufficiently charged. In ideal conditions, the 918 Spyder can cover more than 25 kilometers on purely electric power. In this mode, the combustion engine is only used when needed: maximum engine power is available at a moment’s notice by means of the kick-down function. If the charge state of the battery falls below a set minimum value, the vehicle automatically switches to hybrid mode.
     
    Efficient and comfortable: “hybrid”
     
    In “hybrid” mode, the electric motors and combustion engine work together with the focus on maximum efficiency and minimum fuel consumption. The use of the individual drive components adapts depending on the current driving situation and the desired performance. The hybrid mode is typically used for moderate, consumption-orientated driving styles, e.g. in city traffic.
     
    Sporty and dynamic: “Sport Hybrid”
     
    In more dynamic situations, the 918 Spyder selects the “Sport Hybrid” mode for its motors. The combustion engine is now in constant operation and provides the main propulsive force. In addition, the electric motors provide support in the form of an electric boost when the driver demands higher output, or if there is scope to optimize the operating point of the combustion engine for greater efficiency. The focus of this mode is on performance and a sporty driving style.
     
    For fast laps: “Race Hybrid”
     
    “Race Hybrid” is the mode for the highest possible performance and especially sporty driving style. The combustion engine is chiefly used under high load, and charges the battery when the driver is not utilizing the maximum output. The electric motors provide additional support as necessary in the form of a boost when the driver requires even more power. The electric motors are used up to the maximum power output limit in order to provide the best possible performance for the race track. In this mode, the battery charge state is not kept constant, but instead fluctuates across the entire charge range. In contrast to Sport Hybrid mode, the electric motors run at their maximum power output limits for a short time, thus ensuring better boosting. This increased output is balanced out by the combustion engine charging the battery more powerfully.
     
    For pole position: “Hot Lap”
     
    The “Hot Lap” button in the middle of the map switch releases the 918 Spyder’s last reserves and can only be activated in “Race Hybrid” mode. Similar to a qualification mode, this pushes the traction battery to its maximum power output limits for a few fast laps. This mode uses all of the available energy in the battery.
     
    Main propulsion: the racing car’s eight cylinder engine
     
     
    The main source of propulsion is the 4.6-liter, eight cylinder engine delivering more than 570 hp of power, which was directly derived from the power unit in the successful RS Spyder and explains why it delivers engine speeds of up to 9,000 rpm. Like the RS Spyder’s racing engine, the 918 Spyder power unit features dry-sump lubrication with a separate oil tank and oil extraction. In order to save weight, the four extraction pumps are made of plastic. Further extensive lightweight design measures resulted in, for example, titanium connecting rods, thin-wall, low-pressure casting on the crank case and the cylinder heads, a high-strength, light-weight steel crankshaft and the extremely thin-walled, alloy steel exhaust system. The result of the weight and performance optimizations is a power output per liter of approx. 125 hp/l, which is significantly higher than that of the Carrera GT (106 hp/l) and outstanding for a naturally aspirated engine.
     
    Unique racing car construction heritage: Top Pipes
     
    It isn’t just this engine’s performance but also the sound it makes that stokes the emotionality of the 918 Spyder. This is attributable first and foremost to the so-called top pipes: the tail ­pipes terminate in the upper part of the rear end immediately above the engine. No other production vehicle exhibits this solution. The top pipes’ greatest benefit are the extremely short distances, as the hot exhaust gases are evacuated by the shortest, direct route and the exhaust gas back pressure remains low. This design requires a new, thermodynamic air channeling concept: With the HSI engine, the hot side is located inside in the cylinder V, the intake tracts are outside. There’s a further benefit: the engine compartment remains cooler.
     
    This is especially beneficial to the lithium-ion hybrid battery, as it provides optimum performance at temperatures between 20 and 40 degrees Celsius. As such, less energy needs to be used for active cooling of the battery.
     
    In parallel in the drive line: hybrid module
     
    The V8 engine is coupled to the hybrid module, the 918 Spyder being designed as a parallel hybrid like Porsche’s current hybrid models. Essentially, the hybrid module comprises a 90 kW electric motor and a decoupler acting as the connection with the combustion engine. As a result of the parallel hybrid configuration, the 918 Spyder can be powered at the rear axle both individually by the combustion engine or electric motor or via both drives jointly. As is typical for a Porsche super sports car, the power pack in the 918 Spyder has been placed in front of the rear axle, and does not have any direct mechanical connection to the front axle.
     
    Upside down for low centre of gravity: Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK)
     
    A seven-speed Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) transmission takes care of power transmission to the rear axle. The high-performance transmission based on the PDK in the 911 Turbo has undergone a complete overhaul for the 918 Spyder and was further optimized for high performance. In order to ensure that the installation position and thus the centre of gravity of the entire vehicle were kept low, the gear unit was turned “on its head”, by rotating it 180 degrees about its longitudinal axis, in contrast to the mid-engine, two-seater Boxster, for example. If no propulsive power is required on the rear axle, the two motors can be decoupled by opening the decoupler and PDK clutches. This is what is behind the Porsche hybrid drive’s trademark “coasting” with the combustion engine switched off.
     
    Independent all-wheel drive: front axle with electric motor
     
    On the front axle there is another, independent electric motor with an output of approximately 80 kW. The front electric drive unit drives the wheels via a fixed ratio. A decoupler ensures that the electric motor can be decoupled at high speeds to prevent the motor from over-revving. The drive torque is independently controlled for each axle. This makes for a very responsive all-wheel function, offering great potential for traction and driving dynamics.
     
    Lithium-ion battery with plug-in charging system
     
    The electric energy for the electric motors is stored by a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery comprising 312 individual cells with an energy content of approximately seven kilowatt hours. The battery of the 918 Spyder has a performance-orientated design in terms of both power charging and output in order to fulfill the performance requirements of the electric motor. The power capacity and the operating life of the lithium-ion traction battery are dependent on several factors, including thermal conditions. That is why the 918 Spyder’s battery is liquid-cooled by a dedicated cooling circuit.
     
    To supply it with energy, Porsche developed a new system with a plug-in charging inter face and multiplied recuperation potential. The plug-in interface in the B-column on the front passenger side enables the storage battery to be connected directly with the home mains supply and charged. The charging interface is standardized for the country of purchase. The charger is located close to the traction battery. It converts the alternating current of the mains supply into direct current with a maximum charge output of 3.6 kW. For example, using the charging cable supplied with it, the battery can be charged within four hours from a ten ampere rated, fused power socket on the German 230 Volt mains supply. A compact charging station is also supplied as standard with the 918 Spyder. This can be installed permanently in the driver’s garage. It permits rapid and convenient charging within approximately two hours, irrespective of regional conditions.
     
    Energy recuperation trebled: recuperation
     
    In order to convert the kinetic energy of the vehicle into electric current when braking significantly more effectively than today, Porsche’s developers created a new generation of the recuperation system. A modern-day Porsche hybrid recovers braking energy up to a deceleration of 0.15 g. That corresponds to a braking maneuver in which the driver applies approximately 1.5 kilograms of pedal force. The 918 Spyder can recover up to 0.5 g, equating to eleven kilograms of pedal force – that is more than three times the amount of energy. The 918 Spyder can brake using both electric motors and thus recuperate energy for the traction battery. The super sports car features a ceramic braking system (PCCB) as standard.
     
    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) monocoque promotes lightweight design with low centre of gravity
     
    Despite, or rather because of the heavy components in the electric motor, the 918 Spyder is a model of lightweight design. The load-bearing structure of its body comprises a monocoque with a unit carrier, both of them made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). This concept has a critical part to play in the curb weight of less than 1,700 kilograms, an outstandingly low value for a hybrid vehicle in this performance class. A system of adjustable aerodynamic elements ensures unique, fully adaptive aerodynamics that automatically reconcile optimal efficiency and maximum downforce.
     
    The drivetrain components and all components weighing more than 50 kilograms are located as low down and as centrally as possible within the vehicle. The result is a slightly rear end biased axle load distribution of 57 per cent on the rear axle and 43 per cent on the front axle, combined with an extremely low centre of gravity, ideal for driving dynamics. The central and low position of the traction battery directly behind the driver not only supports the concentration of masses and the lowering of the centre of gravity; it also provides the best temperature conditions for optimum battery functioning.
     
    Chassis with racing car genes and rear-axle steering
     
     
    The Porsche 918 Spyder’s multi-link chassis is inspired by racing car construction, complemented by additional systems such as the adaptive shock-absorber system PASM and rear-axle steering. Basically, this comprises an electro-mechanical adjustment system on each rear wheel. The adjustment is speed-sensitive and executes steering angles of a few degrees in each direction. The rear axle can therefore be steered in the same direction or the opposite direction to the front wheels. At low speeds, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction to the front wheels. This makes cornering even more direct, faster and more precise, and reduces the turning circle. At higher speeds, the system steers the rear wheels in the same direction as the front wheels. This minimizes the “pushing” of the vehicle’s rear end when changing lanes quickly. The result is very secure and stable handling.
     
    A new super sports car for a new decade
     
    The 918 Spyder continues the super sports car line in Porsche history; as technology demonstrators, the driving force behind emotion and evolution alike and the ultimate sports cars of their decade: the Carrera GTS, the first Porsche Turbo, the 959, the 911 GT1, the Carrera GT. More than any of its predecessors, the 918 Spyder is providing a critical impetus to developing the technologies for future vehicle concepts.
     
    Specifications of the Porsche 918 Spyder*
     
    Body:  Two-seater Spyder; carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) monocoque interlocked with CFRP unit carrier; two-piece Targa roof; fixed roll-over protection system. 
     
    Drivetrain:  Parallel full hybrid; 4.6-litre V8 mid-engine with dry-sump lubrication; hybrid module with electric motor and decoupler; electric motor with decoupler and gear unit on front axle; auto start/stop function; electrical system recuperation; four cooling circuits for motors, transmission and battery; thermal management. 
     
    Engine Power:  570 hp (V8 engine) 90 kW (hybrid module on rear axle) 80 kW (electric motor on front axle) 770 hp (combined) 
     
    Max. Torque:  >  750 Nm (combined) 
     
    Maximum Revs:  9,000 rpm 
     
    Power Output per Liter:  ~  125 hp/l (V8 engine) 
     
    Power transmission: Combustion engine with hybrid module and transmission bolted together to form a single drive unit; seven-speed Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK); rear-wheel drive; electric motor in the front with gear unit for driving the front wheels; five pre-selectable operating modes for optimum coordination of all drive units. 
     
    Suspension:  Double-wishbone front axle; optional electro-pneumatic lift system on front axle; electro-mechanical power steering; multi-link rear axle with adaptive electro-mechanical system for individual rear wheel steering; electronically controlled twin-tube gas-pressure dampers in the front and rear with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM).
     
    * Provisional specifications
     
    Brake system:  High-performance hybrid brake system with adaptive recuperation; ceramic brake discs (PCCB). 
     
    Weights: Curb weight, DIN  < 1,700 kg 
     
    Dimensions:
     
    Length: 4,643 mm
    Width: 1,940 mm
    Height: 1,167 mm
    Wheelbase: 2,730 mm
    Luggage compartment capacity ~ 100 l 
     
    Energy supply: Lithium-ion battery with 6.8 kWh capacity (BOL nominal), 202 kW maximum power and mains-compatible plug-in charger. 
     
    Performance:
     
    Top speed > 325 km/h 
    Purely electric  > 150 km/h 
     
    Acceleration:
     
    0 – 100 km/h  < 3.0 s 
    0 – 200 km/h  < 9.0 s 
    0 – 300 km/h  < 27.0 s 
     
    Consumption (NEDC):  Total  ~ 3.0 l/100 km 
    CO2 emissions:  Total  ~ 70 g/km 
    Range:  Purely electric  > 25 km 
     

    Porsche 918 Spyder evolution meets emotion -- Article Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Found these.....sorry if repost

    133657555792701.jpg133657555800703.jpg133657555800102.jpg133657555803204.jpg


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    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    That car is going to be drop dead gorgeous!


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    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Awesome looking thing, can't wait! angel


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    Thats a pretty polished mule. debut ahead of what we first speculated?


    Re: 918 latest news Thread Closed

    dxpetrov:

    Lookey, lookey! What we've got here....

    http://www.auto-motor-und-sport.de/eco/erlkoenig-porsche-918-spyder-superhybridsportler-erstmals-erwischt-3555223.html

    Great find mate! Smiley


    --


     
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