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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Nice video.  Don't think I'll take up any offers of a test drive of the GT2RS as Walter says, when you go back to a normal 911, you wonder what has happened to all the power. lol


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    http://www.phrog.co.uk


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    http://www.vancouversun.com/contests/Driving+fast+shouldn+scary/3342195/story.html

    Driving fast shouldn't be so scary
     
    Crazed journalist had me fearing for my life



    BADEN-BADEN - I am not easily scared. After all, I have sparred with Canadian heavyweight boxing champion Razor Ruddock (well, I sparred; Ruddock, as I remember, giggled). I have exceeded 275 kilometres an hour on a motorcycle with barely a second thought to my personal safety, and I have even -- for a brief moment back in the late 1980s--been married. Truly, I am valiant.

    But, then, I had never driven in a 620-horsepower Porsche with a mad Slovenian in Germany. Initial scrutiny of said Michael Schumacher wannabe yielded no clues I would soon journey through the valley of the shadow of death. Slightly doughy around the edges and outgoing in the extreme (far friendlier, for instance, than Yours Truly), the milquetoasty Bruce Banner-like autojournalist offered no outward indication that the simple act of depressing the gas pedal would transform him into a civilization-threatening Incredible Hulk.

    Within seconds, we were strafing Black Forest backroads at a tempo I can only describe as truly breakneck. Indeed, it was the first time in all my years of co-piloting with fellow autojournalists that I actually started taking an earnest interest in the sturdiness of the guardrails lining the roadway. Trucks coming the other way seemed to grow gargoyles for hood ornaments, their repugnant faces warning me I might soon meet my jailer. I braced myself against the centre console. I held on to the door handle for dear life and, for one particularly thrilling moment, I closed my eyes, trying to meditate for the first time in my life. Had I been religious, I might have even prayed.

    The ironic part of this story is that it wasn't the absolute speed that was so desperately frightening--I have been driven over similar roads with far greater dispatch than my European friend could muster in his most throttle-pegged mania. Indeed, every drive with the Toronto Star's Jim Kenzie ends up with melted rubber and scorched brakes. But I am never afraid.

    The difference is not in how fast you drive but how you drive fast. When my estimable Canadian cohort unwinds a twisty road, it is a relatively calm and relaxed affair, the pace impressive for not only its speed but its lack of drama. My GT2-driving friend, on the other hand, was of the soap opera school of driving -- actual velocity took a back seat to vehicular theatrics. Brakes were jabbed when they should have been squeezed; throttles matted when modulation might have been a better course of action.

    For here is a lesson that all, especially my former Slovenian friend, need to learn -- driving a car fast -- on a race track or otherwise -- should not be a violent affair. Sure, from the outside, it can look like one unending crisis of tire-shredding slides and last-minute braking. But the real secret of superior driving is controlled aggression.

    Driving is not a binary function. Brakes are not meant to be either off or on. Likewise, there are many useful positions for the throttle pedal between idle and wide-open throttle. Stomping on the brakes has all manner of deleterious effects -- weight transfer is dramatic, the balance of the car is upset and the front tires are suddenly overstressed. Mashing the gas pedal has the same effect, only in reverse. The untold story that most non-racers don't fully appreciate is that throttle -- and brake -- application, even at the most elevated of speeds, is a gradual affair. Yes, the very best racers are feeding in power as fast as they think the car can handle it, but it is never, ever a digital affair. Great, dramatic shows of aggression may look great for the camera, but they are never the quickest way down a twisty road.

    What does this matter for everyday driving, you ask? Well, the same lessons apply to everyday driving as well. My friend, former autojournalist and driver instructor extraordinaire Gary Magwood -- who taught me the intricacies of ice racing in about 15 minutes -- used to stress in his driving courses that one of the most common causes of accidents on Highway 401 near his Tweed home was young motorists driving onto the soft shoulder while looking down to switch a radio station. Upon determining they were now off-roading, they would panic and immediately try to rejoin the highway. They would turn the steering wheel forcefully, the outside front tire would dig into the soft sand and, suddenly, it was all arse over tea kettle. If they had just gently steered back onto the roadway, said Magwood, the worst that would have befallen them was dirty tires.

    And if Magwood was around to teach the Slovenian, I might have saved myself some severe gastronomical distress.


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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos










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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Love it in black!


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Spyderidol:

    Love it in black!

     Me too :D

     


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    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” -- George Bernard Shaw


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    This car is beauty AND the beast all in one - I love it  


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    RT Moderator - 997.1 Carrera S GT Silver/Cocoa, -20mm/LSD, PSE, short shifter, SportDesign rims, Zuffenhausen collection

    Rennteam signature photo 2.jpg


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/car/10q3/2011_porsche_911_gt2_rs-first_drive_review



    2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS - First Drive Review

    A wicked, $250,000 high-five.




    Feast your eyes on Porsche’s fiendish self-embrace, a devilish pat on its own back. That’s right, the GT2 RS’s primary reason for being is for the heroic German automaker to reassert itself atop the Nürburgring lap-time pack. And, at 7 minutes 18 seconds—a whopping 14 seconds quicker than the ’08–’09 GT2—it leaves the Corvette ZR1, the Nissan GT-R, the Ferrari 458, the Dodge Viper ACR, and pretty much every other production car in the dust. If you’re still questioning the $167,200 premium over a base 911’s price, also note that the GT2 RS is the first Porsche to one-up the Ring time of another P car, the exotic *Carrera GT.



    Although the RS suffix (for rennsport, German for “racing sport”) is usually reserved for the street-legal homologation versions of racing models, Porsche defensibly decided that this latest GT2 is hard-core enough to deserve the prestigious label anyway. After all, it’s the most powerful Porsche street car ever and the ultimate, 500-unit send-off for the current 997-generation 911, about a quarter of which will be headed to the United States.

    Naturally, horsepower is a component. Dating back to the GT1 Le Mans racer of the late ’90s, the GT2 RS’s twin-turbo, 3.6-liter flat-six was originally a motorsports design and, with constant updating, has been the go-to powerplant for Turbo, GT3, and GT2 models over the past decade. Though it can never match the breathtaking 8400-rpm wail of the naturally aspirated GT3’s engine, this latest boosted variant continues to retain much of the edgy, raspy character that’s often lost in the turbocharging process. It’s a welcome sound overlaid by a 23.2-psi peak hurricane of boost, an increase of 2.9 psi. Along with a more effective intercooler, the GT2 RS achieves 620 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque without increasing the 3.6-liter displacement—that’s 90 horses more than the GT2, 120 over and above the current Turbo, 205 more than the 996 Turbo (’01–’05), and a pretty phenomenal 172 horses per liter. Still, the new car is slightly more efficient than the GT2 and is expected to continue to shirk gas-guzzler penance in the U.S.

    But even more wowing is the meticulous—almost surgical—150-pound paring of mass throughout the car, adding up to a 3050-pound curb weight that undercuts everything from the 996 GT2 of a decade ago to the carbon-fiber-tubbed Carrera GT. And the GT2 starting point—which had ditched the back seat and featured carbon-ceramic brakes, a titanium exhaust, and various carbon-fiber bits—was already impressive.

    Here’s a sampling of the reductions: a single-mass flywheel, 18 pounds (it also seriously hastens the engine’s off-idle response); a carbon-fiber hood (versus aluminum), 5.5 pounds; strategically replacing steel with aluminum for various suspension bits and using two-piece rear springs as well as front springs with fewer coils, 10 pounds; single-lug wheels, 6.6 pounds; swapping the steel hubs of the brake rotors for aluminum, 11 pounds; optional carbon-fiber front fenders (formerly steel), 11 pounds; optional lithium-ion battery, 22 pounds. Porsche even eliminated nine pounds from the carpeting. Working in the opposite direction, U.S.-bound cars have airbag-equipped seats that are 11 pounds heavier (apiece) and rear glass instead of plexiglass, which adds back 8.8 pounds.

    The six-speed manual carries over as the lone transmission, with high-effort though extremely positive and precise shifting action intact. Porsche’s dual-clutch PDK doesn’t bolt up to this engine; plus, it would unacceptably undo half of the weight savings.

    Front grip is increased by half-inch-wider 19-inch wheels with 10-millimeter-broader (245/35) Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires. The rears remain 325/30-19s, but the compound has been reworked to match the newfound front bite. A fixed rear spoiler with a 0.4-inch taller lip and extended front air dam help increase downforce by 60 percent. Long a Porsche hallmark is excellent steering, as well as the concerto of mechanical interconnectedness that makes the GT2 a delight to drive. The brake feel is second to none, and the electronically controlled dampers (PASM) take the edge off the firm ride. We found the grip to go away in a predictable fashion, even in the wet—beware of the absurd quantities of power oversteer available, though—but we’ll reserve judgment on the car’s balance until we can explore the GT2 RS’s mountainous limits on drier and more open roads than during our brief drive in Germany.



    “It’s not about top speed,” insists project manager Andreas Preuninger, although the GT2 RS will do a gearing-limited 206 mph, 192 of  which it deploys during what must be a wonderfully terrifying max-attack Ring lap. Acceleration to 60 mph is also secondary—Porsche would rather quote the claimed 4.1-second improvement from 0 to 300 km/h (186 mph) instead—but should improve by a couple of tenths, to the mid-threes, and continues to be aided by a launch-control system.

    And all it took was a little Nürburgring competition, which doesn’t appear to be letting up. How much more can Porsche possibly extract from its rear-engine stalwart?


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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    0 - 300 - 0 km/h

    28,6 s - Porsche 911 GT2 RS (7,6 s faster than the 997 GT2)

     



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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    A MONSTER.Period!


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos


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    Porsche 997 GT2 & Porsche Cayenne Turbo 8-Spd


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    A pure monster, I love it. Nevermind the price, it destroys GTR, ZR1, 458 and all others! It is so track focussed. Forget zero to 60mph, and top speed, this beast is a serious performer on the time attacks! 0-300-0 7.6 sec improvement is amazing!! 


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    indeed shifting is ancient technology - so is a fuel burning engine..  I happen to like both :) 


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS (First-Drive by Car and Driver)

    "A wicked, $250,000 high-five"

    Feast your eyes on Porsche’s fiendish self-embrace, a devilish pat on its own back. That’s right, the GT2 RS’s primary reason for being is for the heroic German automaker to reassert itself atop the Nürburgring lap-time pack. And, at 7 minutes 18 seconds—a whopping 14 seconds quicker than the ’08–’09 GT2—it leaves the Corvette ZR1, the Nissan GT-R, the Ferrari 458, the Dodge Viper ACR, and pretty much every other production car in the dust. If you’re still questioning the $167,200 premium over a base 911’s price, also note that the GT2 RS is the first Porsche to one-up the Ring time of another P car, the exotic Carrera GT.

    Although the RS suffix (for rennsport, German for “racing sport”) is usually reserved for the street-legal homologation versions of racing models, Porsche defensibly decided that this latest GT2 is hard-core enough to deserve the prestigious label anyway. After all, it’s the most powerful Porsche street car ever and the ultimate, 500-unit send-off for the current 997-generation 911, about a quarter of which will be headed to the United States.

    Naturally, horsepower is a component. Dating back to the GT1 Le Mans racer of the late ’90s, the GT2 RS’s twin-turbo, 3.6-liter flat-six was originally a motorsports design and, with constant updating, has been the go-to powerplant for Turbo, GT3, and GT2 models over the past decade. Though it can never match the breathtaking 8400-rpm wail of the naturally aspirated GT3’s engine, this latest boosted variant continues to retain much of the edgy, raspy character that’s often lost in the turbocharging process. It’s a welcome sound overlaid by a 23.2-psi peak hurricane of boost, an increase of 2.9 psi. Along with a more effective intercooler, the GT2 RS achieves 620 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque without increasing the 3.6-liter displacement—that’s 90 horses more than the GT2, 120 over and above the current Turbo, 205 more than the 996 Turbo (’01–’05), and a pretty phenomenal 172 horses per liter. Still, the new car is slightly more efficient than the GT2 and is expected to continue to shirk gas-guzzler penance in the U.S.

    But even more wowing is the meticulous—almost surgical—150-pound paring of mass throughout the car, adding up to a 3050-pound curb weight that undercuts everything from the 996 GT2 of a decade ago to the carbon-fiber-tubbed Carrera GT. And the GT2 starting point—which had ditched the back seat and featured carbon-ceramic brakes, a titanium exhaust, and various carbon-fiber bits—was already impressive.

    Here’s a sampling of the reductions: a single-mass flywheel, 18 pounds (it also seriously hastens the engine’s off-idle response); a carbon-fiber hood (versus aluminum), 5.5 pounds; strategically replacing steel with aluminum for various suspension bits and using two-piece rear springs as well as front springs with fewer coils, 10 pounds; single-lug wheels, 6.6 pounds; swapping the steel hubs of the brake rotors for aluminum, 11 pounds; optional carbon-fiber front fenders (formerly steel), 11 pounds; optional lithium-ion battery, 22 pounds. Porsche even eliminated nine pounds from the carpeting. Working in the opposite direction, U.S.-bound cars have airbag-equipped seats that are 11 pounds heavier (apiece) and rear glass instead of plexiglass, which adds back 8.8 pounds.

    The six-speed manual carries over as the lone transmission, with high-effort though extremely positive and precise shifting action intact. Porsche’s dual-clutch PDK doesn’t bolt up to this engine; plus, it would unacceptably undo half of the weight savings.

    Front grip is increased by half-inch-wider 19-inch wheels with 10-millimeter-broader (245/35) Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires. The rears remain 325/30-19s, but the compound has been reworked to match the newfound front bite. A fixed rear spoiler with a 0.4-inch taller lip and extended front air dam help increase downforce by 60 percent. Long a Porsche hallmark is excellent steering, as well as the concerto of mechanical interconnectedness that makes the GT2 a delight to drive. The brake feel is second to none, and the electronically controlled dampers (PASM) take the edge off the firm ride. We found the grip to go away in a predictable fashion, even in the wet—beware of the absurd quantities of power oversteer available, though—but we’ll reserve judgment on the car’s balance until we can explore the GT2 RS’s mountainous limits on drier and more open roads than during our brief drive in Germany.

    “It’s not about top speed,” insists project manager Andreas Preuninger, although the GT2 RS will do a gearing-limited 206 mph, 192 of  which it deploys during what must be a wonderfully terrifying max-attack Ring lap. Acceleration to 60 mph is also secondary—Porsche would rather quote the claimed 4.1-second improvement from 0 to 300 km/h (186 mph) instead—but should improve by a couple of tenths, to the mid-threes, and continues to be aided by a launch-control system.

    And all it took was a little Nürburgring competition, which doesn’t appear to be letting up. How much more can Porsche possibly extract from its rear-engine stalwart?

     

    2011-Porsche-911-GT2-RS_Car-and-Driver-article

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos


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    Porsche 997 GT2 & Porsche Cayenne Turbo 8-Spd


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    thanks for the scan, im loving what im seeing


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    indeed shifting is ancient technology - so is a fuel burning engine..  I happen to like both :) 


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

     How come there is not a single press shoot of it in black??


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    I think, this video is new:

     

    http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/videos/...#ixzz0yzbUMBOs 


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

     I got a chance to see two of them on the assembly line being built at Zuffenhausen this last  weekend and that is one mean looking 911, in an understated way, it looked like a serious beast.

    I'm not sure about the mate carbon fiber parts like the front hood and side air scoops, I didn't like the clash of the mate with the shinny rest of the body, especially with a black body since its the same color as the carbon fiber. Black is one of my favorite colors for a 911 but not in this one. With a white body (or colors that are opposed to the carbon fiber's) it probably marries much much better.


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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    I saw the GT2 RS at the factory with Carlos together and yes, I have to agree with him...it looks gorgeous, like a real beast, very aggressive.

    I'm also not sure I like the carbon hood, etc. but if I could afford this beast, I would order it in all matte black (if possible), incl. the rims. Can't help it, I love black on such a car.

    Whoever ordered this car, incl. somebody from the Rennteam Team , should consider himself lucky to be able to get such a beast. It is a wonderful machine.


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    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 997 Turbo, BMW X5 M, BMW M3 Cab DKG, Mini Cooper S JCW


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Carlos from Spain:

     I got a chance to see two of them on the assembly line being built at Zuffenhausen this last  weekend and that is one mean looking 911, in an understated way, it looked like a serious beast.

    I'm not sure about the mate carbon fiber parts like the front hood and side air scoops, I didn't like the clash of the mate with the shinny rest of the body, especially with a black body since its the same color as the carbon fiber. Black is one of my favorite colors for a 911 but not in this one. With a white body (or colors that are opposed to the carbon fiber's) it probably marries much much better.


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     Hi Carlos,

    what two colors did you see at the plant? Silver would be your second best choice, right (after white)? Smiley


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    RC:

    I saw the GT2 RS at the factory with Carlos together and yes, I have to agree with him...it looks gorgeous, like a real beast, very aggressive.

    I'm also not sure I like the carbon hood, etc. but if I could afford this beast, I would order it in all matte black (if possible), incl. the rims. Can't help it, I love black on such a car.

    Whoever ordered this car, incl. somebody from the Rennteam Team , should consider himself lucky to be able to get such a beast. It is a wonderful machine.

     What would be your favorite exterior color Smiley


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    I´d take silver or black but agree that the matte bootlid is a bit obtrusive with those colours. As the remaining carbon parts are rather small in comparison, I would even go that far and paint the front hood in the respective body colour.


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    MKSGR:
    Carlos from Spain:

     I got a chance to see two of them on the assembly line being built at Zuffenhausen this last  weekend and that is one mean looking 911, in an understated way, it looked like a serious beast.

    I'm not sure about the mate carbon fiber parts like the front hood and side air scoops, I didn't like the clash of the mate with the shinny rest of the body, especially with a black body since its the same color as the carbon fiber. Black is one of my favorite colors for a 911 but not in this one. With a white body (or colors that are opposed to the carbon fiber's) it probably marries much much better.


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     Hi Carlos,

    what two colors did you see at the plant? Silver would be your second best choice, right (after white)? Smiley

     

    The one I got the best look of was a black one since it was almost completed in the asembly line. Indeed, IMO white is the best color for this car since its not "hey-look-at-me flashy" yet its sporty, and makes great contrast with the carbon fiber parts. Second choice would be silver.


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    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Porsche 911 GT2 RS driven - £164,107

    http://www.topgear.com/uk/porsche/911-gt2/road-test/rs-driven

    Welcome to the new 911 GT2 RS. Let's talk about first and fourth gears. First gear is relatively long for a first - when you pull away initially, before you get used to it, you give the clutch a dip because the ratio is a little taller than you expect, and you need to feed in a few more revs to get it moving. First runs to 78kph, or 48mph at peak revs of 6,750rpm.

    I'm here to tell you that when you launch this car at full throttle, first gear disappears faster than you could possibly imagine. The GT2 RS's engine is a work of art - among its features are a lightweight single-mass flywheel (8kg lighter than its GT2 equivalent) and two variable-geometry vane turbochargers. This engine runs at 1.6 bar of boost. Not sure if you have a mental marker for bars of boost, but it's time you did because 1.6 is a lot of bars - the standard 911 Turbo, for example, runs at only 0.8 bar.

    Combine this enormous level of boost with the lightweight flywheel, and factor in a racing-spec flat-six 3.6-litre base motor that is free-revving in normally aspirated form and you get an idea of what happens when you give the RS the full works in first gear. BANG and it's gone in a microflash, leaving your gearchange hand lagging and your eyelids fluttering and the engine on the limiter the first time it happens. It is shocking, and looking at the figures, 62mph disappears in 3.5 seconds, so you're hunting for second in about 2.5. Second continues the trend and revs equally quickly up to 80mph in a single, seamless surge, third gear gets you to 109mph and pulls with the same urgency as the first two, and then there's fourth.

    Fourth. Jesus H Christ, Fourth. This side of a Bugatti Veyron or a superbike, I have never experienced anything on the road like Fourth Gear In A 911 GT2 RS. It gets capital letters because it's significant and it's bent right out of proportion. The car pulls fourth like a quick hot-hatch pulls second - it is the same experience as the first three gears. I'm not joking: Fourth in a GT2 RS is a gear that would annihilate just about every car on the road, certainly every car I've driven bar a Bug or a Zegg. It runs all the way to 226kph, or 140mph, and if you've changed into it from third on a flat-out run, you've engaged it at 109mph, a speed you've got to in not much more than seven seconds - that 30mph increment, on a normal quickish A-road, is one that will live with you forever. Because once you start going above 100mph on such a road, it starts to feel very fast indeed - get to 140mph and it starts to feel like you're doing something faintly absurd. OK, I was on a tightish track, but it'd be the same feeling on the road, especially if there are trees. And that 110-140mph blast in the 911 GT2 RS happens in an eye-blink, the car's racing bucket seat trying to force its way through your kidneys. Porsche's official figure for 0-200kph (0-124mph) is 9.8secs, and anything that does 0-100mph in under 10 is shattering.

    I'm going to talk about fourth gear some more because I loved it and you don't have anything better to read right now. This 613bhp engine develops its maximum torque - 516lb ft - between 2,250rpm and 5,500rpm. So you can leave the car in fourth down to 2,200rpm, or about 34mph, and then nail it just for fun, all the way to 140 and jail. I did. The 911's little nose pitches into the air and the engine goes about its deep breathing and fourth gear utterly changes the way you think about fast cars yet again, the digital speedo racking up the numbers like an electrocuted calculator. Fifth and sixth don't exactly feel tardy, either - Porsche says the car gets from 0-300kph (186mph) in 28.9 seconds, a figure that I can't really contemplate but know must be incredibly rapid, assuming your car can get to 300kph in the first place - but above 150mph you're starting to encounter some thick drag. Fourth is where it's at, and you hardly want to go much faster than where that gear takes you.

    Whew, so you get the idea. This is fast. And it's fast around corners too. Porsche claims a lap time of 7min 18 secs around the 'Ring. Again, that should ring a mental marker bell. If it doesn't, consider that it is a full 14 seconds faster than the old 530bhp 911 GT2, which was itself a monster, and 21 seconds faster than a four-wheel-drive 911 Turbo.

    It's not too much for the car, either - the power. It's about adequate and if you ever wanted more, your name is probably Walter Röhrl. The chassis can handle the engine, the question is whether you as a driver are prepared to learn it. I left the stability system well and truly on for my A-road drive, but I suspect that because the engine is so linear and tractable, its throttle response so exact, you could probably drive it rapidly in the wet round a track with all the systems switched off and not be bitten as long as you gave it due respect. It demands quite a bit of respect, this engine, but in every other way - the direct steering, the perfect balance and vivid communication from all four tyres - it's as rewarding and involving as a GT3.

    The engine's supremeness is mostly the work of the VTG (variable turbine geometry) turbochargers. The rotors are small, so they spin up very quickly and limit lag, but with variable vanes they can also develop an incredible amount of boost when you need it at peak revs. So you don't drive it as you would an old-school big-turbo car, like a tuned Toyota Supra, where you mash the throttle about half-an-hour before the apex in anticipation of the boost hitting post-lag - you drive it as you would a normally aspirated machine, working with the boost and knowing it'll be right with you when you want it. This is a very natural and easy car to drive quickly, and even rowing it along on the torque and changing up early, a normally-aspirated GT3 RS wouldn't see which way it went. 

    Ah, the GT3 RS. Now there's a car. If somebody put a GT3 RS and a GT2 RS on my drive and said ‘please choose', what would I do? Many learned hacks from my despicable free-loading trade would take the GT3 without question - it revs to 8,500 rather than 6,700, sounds more soulful, has a purer throttle response than the turbocharged GT2 and is still fast, developing 450bhp and rocketing from 0 to 62mph in 4.0 seconds.

    But I can't agree. Never. Ignoring the price difference - the GT2 RS is £164,107 and the GT3 £104,841, so you've got enough spare change to buy a Nissan GT-R and a GT3 RS for the same price as the turbo car - the GT2 is the one to have. Not only because it's the ultimate, fastest-ever Porsche, but because it's a better car, one that requires greater skill to master. There is nothing quite like its power delivery, and combined with a driveability and tractability at low speed which is as ‘liveable-with' as any hot hatch, you have one of the most amazing performance cars in history. It is an instant classic if ever there was one, especially as only 500 will be made. And now, with European emissions regulations getting ever-tighter, it could be one of the last of the line.

    I interviewed a famous Japanese tuner many years ago, a turbo master called Hosoki. When I asked him whether he appreciated the linear power delivery and crisp throttle response of normally aspirated cars despite working almost exclusively with turbos, he thought for a minute and then said, "you don't pay good money to watch girls play softball - you pay good money to watch men play baseball". The GT3 RS is a girl playing softball. This car is an Australian rugby league test forward making a heavy tackle.

    Bill Thomas

    On your drive for: £4,047pcm
    Performance: 0-62mph in 3.5secs, max speed 205mph, 23.7mpg
    Tech: 3600cc, flat6, RWD, 613bhp, 516lb ft, 1370kg, 284g/km CO2


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    Porsche 997 GT2 & Porsche Cayenne Turbo 8-Spd


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Custom Color / Color to sample is now possible Smiley

    http://forums.rennlist.com/rennforums/997-gt2-gt3-forum/589982-gt2-rs-now-you-can-order-a-pts-colour-let-your-imgination-begin.h...


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    Porsche 997 GT2 & Porsche Cayenne Turbo 8-Spd


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Fayence yellow would look stunningSmiley


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    wow. i download your picture of porsch to make it as my desktop wallpaper. the picture was nice. i just wonder how much is the original price of that car? hmmmm.. but thanks for posting the car's picture.

    hiruishi | miyata

    sports car | auto parts | porsch

     


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    250k


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    Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... That's what gets you.

    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    From Teamspeed











     


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    Porsche 997 GT2 & Porsche Cayenne Turbo 8-Spd


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    Not so sure I like the red interior for some reason, but I'd live with it I suppose.


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    http://www.phrog.co.uk


    Re: 997 GT2 RS - Official Information & Photos

    My "problem" with this is the color coordination.

    I personally would prefer that yellow , red , black and white not be all mixed together.

    Example: If they are going to use yellow on the break calipers, then why not use yellow accents throughout the car . By mixing all the colors together, Porsche is giving the impression (at least to me) that  all of the trim is an "afterthought". It looks like someone got inebriated near the parts bin and decided to throw on additions that were not really made for the car.1284963401193drunk.gif

    Look at the color coordination in the Ferrari in the background.


     
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