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    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Porsche gearbox background...
     
    The very first Porsche gearbox was a transaxle (a common case sharing the gear stack and the differential). All Porsche 356-997 street and race cars share this same design theory. From the first 356 design through the 1980s 911s, Porsche used their own design synchronizers. Even with several evolutions of their own designs, they still proved to be problematic.
     
    The Porsche 911 transmission took on a huge improvement in reliability, durability, and ease of operation in 1987 with Porsche design 950, commonly called the G50 gearbox. They are used from 1987 to present day in all 911, 964, 993, 996, and 997-bodied cars. These heavy-duty gearboxes, made by Getrag, use the Borg-Warner style synchromesh. A variant of this is still used in the 996/997 GT3, GT3R, and 996/997TT/GT2 cars.
     
    As with the earlier Porsche transmissions, Porsche has manufactured many different gear ratios, as well as ring and pinion sets to allow the gearboxes to be set up for virtually any kind of driving. Most of the street car gearing is selected with fuel economy in mind, so there are many opportunities for performance improvements with changing gear sets or ring and pinions. The first version of the gearbox was a 5-speed, but with introduction of the 993 brought on a 6-speed version of the G50 gearbox. The 993TT and four-wheel drive 993 and 993 4S use a similar gearbox with a driveshaft that extends through the nosecone to drive the front wheels.
     
    The G96 gearbox was introduced at the start of production 996/986 cars. The most noticeable difference in these gearboxes is the cable shifter. All 996/986 cars other than 1998-early 1999 996 GT3 cars use a cable shifter. 
     
    The 996 GT3 gearbox is different (type G96/90, G96/93, G96/96) from the standard 996. The GT3 gearbox has evolved from the 993 GT2 which, in turn, evolved from the 993 TT, and before that, the 1989 930 G50/50. The 996 GT3 box is also used in the 996TT/GT2 and 996 GT3 Cup/GT3 RS/RSR race cars. It has a dedicated oil pump and external oil/water intercooler, steel synchronizer rings on gears 3-5, and interchangeable gear ratios (main shaft assembled from individual ratios that are positioned, not pressed into place), and a 40% / 60% asymmetrical clutch type limited slip differential.
     
    At the end of the 996 GT3 RSR production, the sequential gear selection capability came to Porsche racing, the G97 6-speed gearbox was born. Holinger Engineering was consulted for design and production of the internal gear sets. The 997 Cup brought the sequential to mainstream production. The 997 GT3 RSR also uses the same type dog engagement design. Externally, these gearboxes look the same as their predecessor G96 boxes, using many of the same castings, coolers, oil pump, etc. These transmissions have proven themselves to be quite reliable, and as before offering quite a wide range of gear selections. Early 996 Cup/GT3Rs can be converted to sequential capabilities if a customer so desires.
     
    After a year or so of testing, the 2008 997 GT3 RSR introduced a new "clean sheet of paper" design to the transaxle. With Porsche's recent supercar the V10 engined Carrera GT, a new manufacturer (Hör) was brought in to design the 6-speed gearbox. This manufacturer also designed and developed Porsche's new gearbox for the RS Spyder. This successful relationship with Porsche Motorsport also brought new eyes to one of the biggest issues with the G50 based gearbox. In the Porsche race world the axle geometry has been an issue for the past two decades. As the cars are lowered for racing, the axles tend to have more and more extreme angles, causing axle failure. This issue has been resolved with the new design. The gearbox is also lighter, and focused on details internally to decrease the friction on contact points...
     
     
     
    ...maybe Porsche have commissioned Hör to develop a new gearbox for the 991 GT3 / RS / RSR -- following their development of the Carrera GT and RS Spyder transmissions? 
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley SmileySmiley

    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Porsche 911 GT3 RSR 4.0

    "MotorsFan17 filmed this special edition 911 GT3 RSR 4.0. Originally a normal 3.8 liter GT3 RS, but the owner decided to upgrade the engine to a 4.0 liters and created a new aerodynamic setup for his car.

    You can clearly see he extended the wheel arches, widened the track of the wheels, fitted a new rear spoiler and added additional aero fins at the front. On the technical side, a new exhaust was installed and it seems the suspension has been tweaked as well."

    Porsche 911 GT3 RSR 4.0 -- Video Link

    ...maybe a little inspiration for Andreas Preuninger and the team of engineers in Weissach developing the Porsche 991 GT3 RS?

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    Porsche 997 GT3 RSR -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Porsche gearbox background...
     
    The very first Porsche gearbox was a transaxle (a common case sharing the gear stack and the differential). All Porsche 356-997 street and race cars share this same design theory. From the first 356 design through the 1980s 911s, Porsche used their own design synchronizers. Even with several evolutions of their own designs, they still proved to be problematic.
     
    The Porsche 911 transmission took on a huge improvement in reliability, durability, and ease of operation in 1987 with Porsche design 950, commonly called the G50 gearbox. They are used from 1987 to present day in all 911, 964, 993, 996, and 997-bodied cars. These heavy-duty gearboxes, made by Getrag, use the Borg-Warner style synchromesh. A variant of this is still used in the 996/997 GT3, GT3R, and 996/997TT/GT2 cars.
     
    As with the earlier Porsche transmissions, Porsche has manufactured many different gear ratios, as well as ring and pinion sets to allow the gearboxes to be set up for virtually any kind of driving. Most of the street car gearing is selected with fuel economy in mind, so there are many opportunities for performance improvements with changing gear sets or ring and pinions. The first version of the gearbox was a 5-speed, but with introduction of the 993 brought on a 6-speed version of the G50 gearbox. The 993TT and four-wheel drive 993 and 993 4S use a similar gearbox with a driveshaft that extends through the nosecone to drive the front wheels.
     
    The G96 gearbox was introduced at the start of production 996/986 cars. The most noticeable difference in these gearboxes is the cable shifter. All 996/986 cars other than 1998-early 1999 996 GT3 cars use a cable shifter. 
     
    The 996 GT3 gearbox is different (type G96/90, G96/93, G96/96) from the standard 996. The GT3 gearbox has evolved from the 993 GT2 which, in turn, evolved from the 993 TT, and before that, the 1989 930 G50/50. The 996 GT3 box is also used in the 996TT/GT2 and 996 GT3 Cup/GT3 RS/RSR race cars. It has a dedicated oil pump and external oil/water intercooler, steel synchronizer rings on gears 3-5, and interchangeable gear ratios (main shaft assembled from individual ratios that are positioned, not pressed into place), and a 40% / 60% asymmetrical clutch type limited slip differential.
     
    At the end of the 996 GT3 RSR production, the sequential gear selection capability came to Porsche racing, the G97 6-speed gearbox was born. Holinger Engineering was consulted for design and production of the internal gear sets. The 997 Cup brought the sequential to mainstream production. The 997 GT3 RSR also uses the same type dog engagement design. Externally, these gearboxes look the same as their predecessor G96 boxes, using many of the same castings, coolers, oil pump, etc. These transmissions have proven themselves to be quite reliable, and as before offering quite a wide range of gear selections. Early 996 Cup/GT3Rs can be converted to sequential capabilities if a customer so desires.
     
    After a year or so of testing, the 2008 997 GT3 RSR introduced a new "clean sheet of paper" design to the transaxle. With Porsche's recent supercar the V10 engined Carrera GT, a new manufacturer (Hör) was brought in to design the 6-speed gearbox. This manufacturer also designed and developed Porsche's new gearbox for the RS Spyder. This successful relationship with Porsche Motorsport also brought new eyes to one of the biggest issues with the G50 based gearbox. In the Porsche race world the axle geometry has been an issue for the past two decades. As the cars are lowered for racing, the axles tend to have more and more extreme angles, causing axle failure. This issue has been resolved with the new design. The gearbox is also lighter, and focused on details internally to decrease the friction on contact points...
     
     
    ...maybe Porsche have commissioned Hör to develop a new gearbox for the 991 GT3 / RS / RSR -- following their development of the Carrera GT and RS Spyder transmissions? 
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley SmileySmiley

    The paddle-shift gearbox in the 2012 Porsche 911 GT3 R could be a preview of the gearbox 991 GT3 / RS / RSR...

    2012 Porsche GT3 R onboard at the Nurburgring...

    2012 Porsche GT3 R onboard at the Nurburgring -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    I think the GT3 R box is sequential rather than PDK?


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Correct.

    Porsche 6-speed sequential dog gearbox with active oil cooling and internal pressurized oil lubrication system


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    boytronic:

    I think the GT3 R box is sequential rather than PDK?

    Even the RSRs with paddle shifters aren't PDK, just padlle operated sequential I believe.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    correct.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    PDK is a LONG way from these sequential manuals!  Not even close.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    2013 Porsche 991 GT3 to have Manual Transmission as standard, with PDK possible option...

    Latest rumours suggest the 2013 Porsche 991 GT3 will have a manual transmission as standard, with PDK to be a possible option...

    Porsche have previously made it clear that the PDK transmission would need to lose the weight penalty before it could be offered in the GT3 / RS models, so the open question is how the new transmission will be designed -- e.g. double-clutch or single-clutch, sequential transmission with active oil cooling and internal pressurised oil lubrication system, three pedals with clutch or two pedals only, wet clutch pack or carbon composite race clutch, external dry-sump, single mass flywheel, LSD, etc...

    Smiley SmileySmiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    We're not reinventing the wheel here.... BMW only gave a NON-Manual gearbox in the CSL in 2003. The 360hp CSL rang rings around the GT3 (at the time) on track with no issues apart from a minor software upgrade.

    Ferrari only gave a NON-Manual  gearbox in the 425hp 360 CS and 510hp F430 Scuderia. Both of these cars have been raced heavily on track continuously over the years.

    If these manufacturers can do it then so can Porsche. If PDK is too heavy then ditch it and create a gearbox that works! ;)


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    ...But the Ferrari 458 GTC (the one that races in the ACO GTE class) uses a Hewland 6 speed sequential.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    CSL had Cup tires...


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    I'm sorry but a GT3 is NOT a GT3 without a manual transmission. I don't care if Ferrari goes flappy paddle (there so far gone and nannied as it is), GT3 should be manual only and always.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Carrara:

    I'm sorry but a GT3 is NOT a GT3 without a manual transmission. I don't care if Ferrari goes flappy paddle (there so far gone and nannied as it is), GT3 should be manual only and always.


    Where's the problem if you have the choice? Smiley


    --

    The secret of life is to admire without desiring.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Carrara:

    I'm sorry but a GT3 is NOT a GT3 without a manual transmission. I don't care if Ferrari goes flappy paddle (there so far gone and nannied as it is), GT3 should be manual only and always.

    Porsche should prove their engineering ability by offering a top DCT for these cars, like Ferrari, McLaren, BMW and Mercedes do. They will increase their sales in this segment too.

    I agree that they shouldn't abandon MT for as long there is demand for this traditional and charismatic system.

     


    --

    "Form follows function"


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    I am sure there will be a money spinning +10k "light-weight-option" for a eighter sequential or similar tranny shaving off a couple of seconds....Porsche has always been good at that !


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    boytronic:

    We're not reinventing the wheel here.... BMW only gave a NON-Manual gearbox in the CSL in 2003. The 360hp CSL rang rings around the GT3 (at the time) on track with no issues apart from a minor software upgrade.

    Ferrari only gave a NON-Manual  gearbox in the 425hp 360 CS and 510hp F430 Scuderia. Both of these cars have been raced heavily on track continuously over the years.

    If these manufacturers can do it then so can Porsche. If PDK is too heavy then ditch it and create a gearbox that works! ;)

    At present that Nring time the CSL put down remains a mistery. The 996 GT3 really is a faster car on track than the CSL. Regardless of how magnificent I think the CSL is, it is not a faster car than the 996 GT3, and the SMG transmission feels hopelessly outdated today.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    A bit of inspiration for Andreas Preuninger and the team of Porsche Motorsport engineers in Weissach...

    Chris Harris On Cars: "Tuthill 911 Rally Car"

     
    Harris on safe ground in a retro rally-spec 911 but just watch him go...
     
    (4 April 2012)
     
    Look away now if you don't like 911s. Especially old ones.
     
    I happen to like these cars - a fact that regularly lands me in trouble. The one featured in this video is a 3.5-litre monster used in the Belgian rally championship. Richard Tuthill was testing at Prodrive's track near Warwick, so I went along to annoy him and blag a go in this extraordinary car.
     
    It appears that there are very few technical rules in this series, because what started out as an innocent little 70s 911 has been transformed into one of the most brutal cars I've driven in a while. Excusing the continuity mistake in the vid - the car has more like 365hp - and taking the weight as around 1,000kg, this car is monstrously fast. Then look at the gearing - it'll just hit 120mph in 5th gear - and you'll understand how potent it is.
     
     
    Chris Harris on home turf...
     
    The transmission is a new design - effectively a 915 'box converted to dog-rings and you can flat shift up and down, giving genuine two-pedal driving should you want it. The engine is taken out to 3.5 litres and runs slide injection. It's a flipping masterpiece: so torquey you don't really need to go beyond 7,000rpm. The noise is - well, I suppose the beauty of video is I don't have to describe the thing to you. Just listen.
     
     
    'Making progress' the Harris way...
     
    It's a car that loves to be hustled - it responds to light provocation, but take liberties and it'll make you look an idiot. You quickly learn to use that mass behind the rear axle to make a change of direction or set it up for a corner. 
    The car is driven by Glenn Janssens in the Belgian Rally Championship. He's a lucky blighter.
     
    Enjoy the vid.
     
     
     
     
    "Recipe to make a Tuthill 911 historic rally car: Take one donor shell, add 3.5 litre motor, extract 365hp. Remove weight to 1000kg, add dog-gearbox. Then have as much fun as you can in a car..."
     
     
     
     
    ...thanks and all due credit to Chris Harris and Tuthill Porsche!

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    great article - Chris Harris' passion for cars makes it fun watching him.  He and Tiff Nedell both have a way to transferring their passion about a car in a way that it gives you a real sense of how the car is, not a typical journalist seal of approval


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    another fine video from Chris - about real driving !!! Fantastic job !


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Porsche 991 GT3 images by Wild Speed...

    Porsche 991 GT3 images by Wild Speed -- Link

    ...thanks and all due credit to Wild Speed!

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Have to give credit where its due - a lot of work must have gone into those! :)


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Boxster Coupe GTS:
    Porsche gearbox background...
     
    The very first Porsche gearbox was a transaxle (a common case sharing the gear stack and the differential). All Porsche 356-997 street and race cars share this same design theory. From the first 356 design through the 1980s 911s, Porsche used their own design synchronizers. Even with several evolutions of their own designs, they still proved to be problematic.
     
    The Porsche 911 transmission took on a huge improvement in reliability, durability, and ease of operation in 1987 with Porsche design 950, commonly called the G50 gearbox. They are used from 1987 to present day in all 911, 964, 993, 996, and 997-bodied cars. These heavy-duty gearboxes, made by Getrag, use the Borg-Warner style synchromesh. A variant of this is still used in the 996/997 GT3, GT3R, and 996/997TT/GT2 cars.
     
    As with the earlier Porsche transmissions, Porsche has manufactured many different gear ratios, as well as ring and pinion sets to allow the gearboxes to be set up for virtually any kind of driving. Most of the street car gearing is selected with fuel economy in mind, so there are many opportunities for performance improvements with changing gear sets or ring and pinions. The first version of the gearbox was a 5-speed, but with introduction of the 993 brought on a 6-speed version of the G50 gearbox. The 993TT and four-wheel drive 993 and 993 4S use a similar gearbox with a driveshaft that extends through the nosecone to drive the front wheels.
     
    The G96 gearbox was introduced at the start of production 996/986 cars. The most noticeable difference in these gearboxes is the cable shifter. All 996/986 cars other than 1998-early 1999 996 GT3 cars use a cable shifter. 
     
    The 996 GT3 gearbox is different (type G96/90, G96/93, G96/96) from the standard 996. The GT3 gearbox has evolved from the 993 GT2 which, in turn, evolved from the 993 TT, and before that, the 1989 930 G50/50. The 996 GT3 box is also used in the 996TT/GT2 and 996 GT3 Cup/GT3 RS/RSR race cars. It has a dedicated oil pump and external oil/water intercooler, steel synchronizer rings on gears 3-5, and interchangeable gear ratios (main shaft assembled from individual ratios that are positioned, not pressed into place), and a 40% / 60% asymmetrical clutch type limited slip differential.
     
    At the end of the 996 GT3 RSR production, the sequential gear selection capability came to Porsche racing, the G97 6-speed gearbox was born. Holinger Engineering was consulted for design and production of the internal gear sets. The 997 Cup brought the sequential to mainstream production. The 997 GT3 RSR also uses the same type dog engagement design. Externally, these gearboxes look the same as their predecessor G96 boxes, using many of the same castings, coolers, oil pump, etc. These transmissions have proven themselves to be quite reliable, and as before offering quite a wide range of gear selections. Early 996 Cup/GT3Rs can be converted to sequential capabilities if a customer so desires.
     
    After a year or so of testing, the 2008 997 GT3 RSR introduced a new "clean sheet of paper" design to the transaxle. With Porsche's recent supercar the V10 engined Carrera GT, a new manufacturer (Hör) was brought in to design the 6-speed gearbox. This manufacturer also designed and developed Porsche's new gearbox for the RS Spyder. This successful relationship with Porsche Motorsport also brought new eyes to one of the biggest issues with the G50 based gearbox. In the Porsche race world the axle geometry has been an issue for the past two decades. As the cars are lowered for racing, the axles tend to have more and more extreme angles, causing axle failure. This issue has been resolved with the new design. The gearbox is also lighter, and focused on details internally to decrease the friction on contact points...
     
     
    ...maybe Porsche have commissioned Hör to develop a new gearbox for the 991 GT3 / RS / RSR -- following their development of the Carrera GT and RS Spyder transmissions? 
     
    Smiley SmileySmiley SmileySmiley

    The paddle-shift in the Porsche 911 GT3 R could be a preview of the gearbox in the 991 GT3 / RS / RSR...

    2012 Porsche GT3 R onboard at the Nurburgring...

    2012 Porsche GT3 R onboard at the Nurburgring -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley

    2012 Porsche GT3 R at the Nurburgring...

    Porsche GT3 R at the Nurburgring -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Future Porsches - 918 to Pajun...

     
    (Automobile magazine, May 2012)
     
    918 Spyder: The New King Of The Hill
     
    The hottest -- and hardest to get -- future Porsche sports car will be the 918 Spyder, which is well along in its development two years after it debuted as a concept at the Geneva auto show. Conceived as a successor to the 2004 Carrera GT, the 918 Spyder aims to offer even better performance. That's no easy task: the Carrera GT could storm from 0 to 62 mph in 3.9 seconds, was good for a top speed of 205 mph, and lapped the Nordschleife in 7 minutes and 32 seconds. The new car should surpass all of that save top speed, which Porsche projects at 200 mph.
    Of course, the Carrera GT was never very good at traveling without gasoline, something the 918 will be able to do for fifteen miles thanks to its 7-kWh lithium-ion battery pack. The 330-pound power pack can crank up 230 hp.
     
    Overboost pushes that to 275 hp, but only for a couple of seconds. The battery pack sits in a niche between the driver and the engine, right below the fuel tank. It feeds two electric motors: one is sandwiched between the V-8 and the seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission; the other one drives the front wheels. Power output is in the neighborhood of 110 hp per unit. The 918 will come with a high-voltage wall charger that can fully recharge the batteries in two hours; with a conventional socket it takes seven hours.
     
    The gasoline engine, mounted low in the chassis, is an aluminum 4.6-liter V-8 that started life in Porsche's Class 2 Le Mans prototype, the RS Spyder. Here it will be tuned to about 550 hp. That's less than the Carrera GT's 612 hp, but whereas that car's short-lived V-10 had to rev to 5750 rpm to produce 435 lb-ft, the brand-new V-8 delivers its maximum torque of some 515 lb-ft at a much more relaxed 3500 rpm, although it will rev to a screaming 9000-rpm redline. The combined output from the internal-combustion engine and electric motors will be at least 720 hp. The aggregate twist action works out to an equally impressive 550 lb-ft.
     
    Special features of the 4.6-liter V-8 are titanium connecting rods, a crankcase and cylinder heads made of cast aluminum, a lightweight crankshaft forged from high-strength steel, and a thin-wall exhaust fabricated from a special type of sheet alloy. Dry-sump lubrication is, of course, a must.
     
    The 918 Spyder can drive the rear wheels either by electric motor only, by V-8 only, or by a combination of the two. Add to this the electrically powered front wheels, and you have on-demand four-wheel drive plus torque vectoring for enhanced cornering. The driver will be able to select from five different drive modes via a joystick mounted to the steering wheel (Porsche's answer to the manettino by Ferrari). E stands for purely electric -- it's also front-wheel drive. E, the default mode, is typically used in noise- and emissions-sensitive areas, like the vicinity of the owner's home. Since FWD E-power is limited to 110 hp, the rear e-motor jumps in relatively frequently. After the fifteen- to twenty-mile charge is depleted, the car will switch to hybrid operation.
     
    H denotes hybrid operation, which is the preferred city-driving mode. Then there's Sport Hybrid, which relies on a mix of V-8 and one or two electric motors. Race Hybrid mode ensures that the V-8 keeps charging the power pack at all times and provides electric boost under full acceleration. Last but not least is the Hot Lap button, which briefly unleashes the total power output of the main propulsion battery. Porsche claims that, in the case of the 918 Spyder, a fully charged power pack will improve the lap time at the Nuerburgring by six seconds, to 7 minutes, 22 seconds.
     
     
    When the concept car was unveiled in 2010, research and development (then under Wolfgang Duerheimer, now masterminded by Wolfgang Hatz) posted a weight target of 3285 pounds, but now that tooling is nearing completion, the number mentioned in informed circles is 3640 pounds (versus 3043 pounds for the Carrera GT). The weight distribution is a slightly tail-happy 43/57 percent. Attached to the chassis is a carbon-fiber monocoque clad with panels made of carbon fiber, aluminum, and magnesium. The drag coefficient is said to be 0.30. The front spoiler consists of two horizontally staggered carbon-fiber blades, the active tail rudder optimizes downforce, and the underbody is completely flush for optimum aerodynamic efficiency.
     
     
    The suspension layout bears a strong resemblance to the Carrera GT's, sources say, and the magnesium wheels are fitted with 265/35YR-19 Michelins in the front and 335/30YR-20 footwear at the rear. The big news is the standard four-wheel steering -- a first for Porsche. At lower velocities, the rear wheels countersteer for improved maneuverability. At high speeds, they move in sync with the front wheels for superior stability. Under certain driving conditions, the rear wheels are locked in the straight-ahead position. Porsche claims that rear-wheel steering shaves several seconds off the car's Nuerburgring lap time by distributing the cornering forces more evenly between the axles.
     
     
    As you read these lines, Porsche will have already started conducting track tests with a rolling chassis, and by late summer the first fully dressed mules should hit the road. Production of this groundbreaking supercar is due to start next year, on September 18 (9/18), in the Zuffenhausen factory. Volume is limited to 918 units, and the asking price is a whopping $845,000.
     
    960: Challenging Ferrari
     
    Even as Porsche engineers ready the impossibly advanced 918 Spyder hybrid supercar, they're also putting together an only slightly less exotic coupe that's internally called the 960. Porsche foreshadowed its intent to build such a car when it showed the 918 RSR concept at the 2011 Detroit show. Contrary to the concept's name, however, this sports car will share almost nothing with the Spyder. Instead, the 960 rides on a new mid-engine architecture that will eventually underpin several Lamborghinis as well as the replacement for the next-generation Boxster.
    Initially, the 960 was to be powered by a twin-turbo V-8, and it tapped the 918 Spyder for inspiration in terms of design and carbon-fiber structure. But the accountants and the product planners were not happy with this high-end pitch, so we can now expect a more pragmatic approach that revolves around a double-twin-scroll-turbo 4.0-liter flat six good for about 600 hp and 550 lb-ft of torque. Why the change? Because the flat six is more compact, helps to lower the center of gravity, is more efficient as well as slightly cheaper to build, and offers that signature Porsche touch. The 960, which could resemble the illustration below, will be a relative bargain compared with the 918 Spyder, but with a price near $250,000, it still won't be cheap.
     
    More 911s: A No-Brainer
     
    Of course, Porsche's sports car lineup isn't complete without a full array of 911s. The new model, introduced last year, will predictably spin off a dizzying number of variants, including the all-wheel-drive 4S, the Turbo, and a GT3. Porsche also will live up to its tradition of making customers pay more for less equipment with a decontented, lightweight Clubsport package.
     
     
    One major new twist involves the 911 Targa, which debuts in early 2014. In recent years, it's been little more than a glorified sunroof, but Porsche wants to recreate the much-loved late-1960s/'70s Targa, which was available with a folding removable top and a heated glass backlight. The most prominent design detail of this classic Porsche roof treatment was the substantial roll bar available in anodized silver or matte black. The modern iteration of the classic Targa theme should look particularly striking thanks to a lower roofline, a more radically angled roll bar, and a wraparound rear window. The optional Turbo-look body style, which will likely be offered across the 911 lineup, will add an even-more-voluptuous rear end and optional twenty-one-inch wheels.
     
    Macan: A Smaller SUV
     
    The vehicle previously known as the Cajun (Cayenne Junior) will officially be called the Macan. Porsche says the name is derived from the Indonesian word for tiger. Porsche's second SUV will launch as a four-door in the fall of 2013. As our spy illustrations indicate, it should look somewhat familiar since the greenhouse and the basic structure are taken from the Audi Q5, but the Macan will have its own body panels and interior. Other Porsche-specific touches include a Sport Chrono pack with launch control, stronger brakes with optional carbon-ceramic discs, larger wheels, and a new exhaust system with a switchable free-flow sport muffler.
     
    The powertrains also come from Audi and include a 2.0-liter four-cylinder and a 3.0-liter V-6 producing about 240 hp and 290 hp, respectively. In addition, there's a Macan Turbo S in the works. It features Porsche's own heavily tweaked 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 rated at 350 hp. Also planned is a Macan Hybrid, fitted with a 230-hp four-cylinder complemented by a 50-hp electric motor.
     
    Likely but not yet confirmed is a two-door model, due in 2014. Mind you, this is the version that Audi would have preferred Porsche concentrate on to begin with, but Porsche wants the four-door volume. And, indeed, executives are expecting a lot of volume -- some 50,000 Macans a year.
     
    Panamera and Pajun: More Four-Doors
     
    Approximately one year from now, Porsche will launch the Panamera XXL, a stretched version of its luxury sedan sporting a 5.9-inch-longer wheelbase. At the same time, the car is due to undergo a comprehensive face-lift. That will carry the Panamera out to 2015, when we will see the follow-up version. It will be lighter, not quite as big, and better suited for sporty derivatives. The second-generation Panamera will use a new architecture known as MSB-F. This acronym denotes a front-mid-engine modular rear-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive layout. MSB-F is being developed in Weissach for Porsche, Bentley, and Lamborghini.
     
     
    A smaller Porsche sedan is still known by its code name, Pajun, short for Panamera Junior. The Pajun uses the same flexible components set as its bigger sibling and will appear in 2016. It debuts as a four-door four-seater but over time will spawn a convertible and a coupe or sporty hatchback. It's described as an antiestablishment sedan -- sharp, striking, and spirited. Its three-box shape should help avoid cannibalization with the larger Panamera, which is expected to retain its egg-shaped, 911-inspired rear end.
     
    As far as powertrains go, Porsche is the driving force behind the new modular V engines that will be used by all the premium brands in the Volkswagen Group. Starting in 2013-14, the Panamera/Pajun and the Cayenne/Macan are expected to become available with a range of much-improved turbocharged engines. We expect a 3.0-liter V-6 (slated to produce about 400 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque), a 3.6-liter V-8 (500 hp and 500 lb-ft), a 4.0-liter V-8 (550 hp, 515 lb-ft), and a high-performance S edition likely to churn out 550 hp and more than 515 lb-ft. Alternatively, there will be a pair of Audi-sourced 3.0-liter V-6 turbo-diesel units rated at about 245 hp and 325 hp. In addition, we'll see an uprated 4.2-liter V-8 TDI, which should muster some 365 hp. Also in the works are two plug-in hybrids, one with a 220-hp four-cylinder and the other with a 330-hp V-6, both hooked to a pair of electric motors that add at least another 135 hp to the grand total.
     
    Once the Pajun has been established in the marketplace, Porsche's total production output should exceed 200,000 vehicles per year.
     
     
     
    -- Automobile article by Georg Kacher
     

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    1334412587942yuck.gif


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Ugly!


    --

    There is no try. Just do.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    That Targa will be awesome if they get the retro look right...


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    01249171128_2_47889124.jpg


    --


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    That´s one of the Kentenich brothers from Neuss. Niclas Kentenich is driving GT cars and they launched their own tuning company a while ago. Interesting to see though...

    kiss


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Ferdie:

    That´s one of the Kentenich brothers from Neuss. Niclas Kentenich is driving GT cars and they launched their own tuning company a while ago. Interesting to see though...

    kiss

    They're always present at the Nordschleife with various cars, ranging from a 750i with bucket seats, a GT3 RS, CLK 63 BS, ...

    Always with NE:KE registered plates if I'm not mistaken.


     
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