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    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Even though there aren't really any new details revealed in those pictures, they give us an excellent look at the one we already know about! Best pictures yet of the new 911 Turbo. 

    And from the video, the sound is still mediocre, but no doubt better than the 997.2 Turbo. On the 997.2 all you heard was a vaccum, at least on the 991 Turbo you can slightly hear the engine. I


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    I love that a young guy is in the passenger seat with nomex and a helmet while the driver is an old guy in shirt sleeves and helmetless!


    --
    Past-President, Porsche Club of America - Upper Canada Region

    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    That "young" guy has the helmet of the "old" guy on his knees - they are driving on a public road next to the N-ring.

    The german police likes to give 15 EUR tickets to the Test-Drivers, when they leave the track with their helmets on Smiley

    Blueflame Smiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    blueflame

    The german police likes to give 15 EUR tickets to the Test-Drivers, when they leave the track with their helmets on Smiley

    SmileySo I must have been lucky not to get a ticket as I often put off the helmet at the nearby gas station only after leaving the track Smiley

    As for the old guys: some of them are somewhat "special" when it comes to the use of safety equipment. Some time ago one of these Porsche 917 race veterans (high in his 60ies) drove a lap in my GT3 on the Nordschleife. After climbing into the bucket seats I asked him: do you want to use the 3-point belt or the 6-point-harness ? Answer: none of these - we're only going to cruise around the track Smiley The cruising mode lasted until Schwedenkreuz, when another GT3 became bigger in the rearview mirror.....SmileySmiley


    --

    public roads: Porsche 987 S Seal/Cocoa, toll road Smiley : Porsche 997 GT3 Arctic/Black


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Porsche-Jeck:
    blueflame

    The german police likes to give 15 EUR tickets to the Test-Drivers, when they leave the track with their helmets on Smiley

    SmileySo I must have been lucky not to get a ticket as I often put off the helmet at the nearby gas station only after leaving the track Smiley

    As for the old guys: some of them are somewhat "special" when it comes to the use of safety equipment. Some time ago one of these Porsche 917 race veterans (high in his 60ies) drove a lap in my GT3 on the Nordschleife. After climbing into the bucket seats I asked him: do you want to use the 3-point belt or the 6-point-harness ? Answer: none of these - we're only going to cruise around the track Smiley The cruising mode lasted until Schwedenkreuz, when another GT3 became bigger in the rearview mirror.....SmileySmiley


    You are a lucky guy - this is no joke.Smiley

    The problem is not just the helmet, also the balaclava/mask is not allowed in a car in german-public traffic. For examle, it is also not allowed to wear a funny mask during carnival in your car. This is not because of saftey-reasons - it is because, your face must always be seen.

    If you use an open-face-helmet without a mask, the police should not have a problem with it.Smiley

    I know at least one test driver, who paid the 15 EUR - with a closed helmet.

    BlueflameSmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    blueflame:

    I know at least one test driver, who paid the 15 EUR - with a closed helmet.

    If you think how much a track day would cost, 15 EUR extra is not a lot if someone wants to do his thing.


    --

    "Form follows function"


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    @ blueflame: I was sure that you weren't kidding Smiley Seems that you also provided the explanation why I haven't earned a "helmeting" ticket yet - I usually wear an (open) jet helmet without balaclava. As for the funny masks: I recall that many years ago in the Carnival high season a pig was driving may car SmileySmiley


    --

    public roads: Porsche 987 S Seal/Cocoa, toll road Smiley : Porsche 997 GT3 Arctic/Black


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    blueflame:
    Porsche-Jeck:

    So I must have been lucky not to get a ticket as I often put off the helmet at the nearby gas station only after leaving the track Smiley

    As for the old guys: some of them are somewhat "special" when it comes to the use of safety equipment. Some time ago one of these Porsche 917 race veterans (high in his 60ies) drove a lap in my GT3 on the Nordschleife. After climbing into the bucket seats I asked him: do you want to use the 3-point belt or the 6-point-harness ? Answer: none of these - we're only going to cruise around the track Smiley The cruising mode lasted until Schwedenkreuz, when another GT3 became bigger in the rearview mirror.....SmileySmiley


    You are a lucky guy - this is no joke.

    The problem is not just the helmet, also the balaclava/mask is not allowed in a car in german-public traffic. For examle, it is also not allowed to wear a funny mask during carnival in your car. This is not because of saftey-reasons - it is because, your face must always be seen.

    If you use an open-face-helmet without a mask, the police should not have a problem with it.


    I thought about PJ being a lucky guy as well, but rather because of his experiences on the track. Smiley

    What about cars without a windscreen, such as the Ariel Atom or KTM X-bow? Any motorbike rider is wearing a helmet and doesn´t even have a license plate on the frontend, why is this any different driving a car?


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    These cars and the Renault Sport Spider and the Lotus 2-11 are excluded, (Cars without windscreens and wipers)also Trikes.

    Motorbikes also - may be Porsche-Jeck should try to pass a police car on a bike with his pig-costume for confirmation.Smiley

    BlueflameSmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Porsche 991: secrets of the new 911 cabrio's roof..

    - Article by Georg Kacher

    (26 October 2011)

    Porsche is readying the new 991-spec 911 Cabriolet for launch in summer 2012. In many regards, it's business as usual: it's a soft-top convertible version of the new 911 coupe. But its roof holds one or two secrets up its sleeve.

    The 911 Cabriolet's top still looks as if it was made of soft fabric, but it actually consists of three semi-rigid lightweight panels coated with a novel furry material which conceals the cutlines.

    Porsche 991 Cabriolet: does it fold flush?

    Inspired by the Boxster, the folded stack does without a rigid tonneau cover on the 991. Naturally, everything is powered and the roof will flop up or down in less than 20 seconds - at speeds of up to around 30mph.

    The optional sunroof is a so-called top-glider, a large tinted glass or painted aluminium panel which comes to rest on top of the roof rather than between roof and headliner. A bit like on the Mini cabrio.

    The fabric is claimed to be very soundproof and the rear glass screen is heated and scratchproof.

    Engines in the Porsche 911 Cabriolet

    We expect the 911 cabrio to be offered as Carrera and Carrera S trim. The sole available 911 engines for the first 18 months of production are a pair of uprated flat sixes. The next C2/C4 will be powered by a 3.4-litre direct-injection unit rated at 350bhp; the C2S/C4S will be fitted with a 3.8-litre motor good for 400bhp. Variocam plus (adjustable camshafts), switchable manifolds and two-stage free-flow exhausts are standard.

    Four-wheel drive versions are due to be launched in December 2012, followed by the usual 911 cascade of variants. The culmination? The 911 Turbo widebody whaletail soft-top due in 2014.

    What about the 911 Targa?

    If you like your 911s open but not exposed, you'll have to wait for the planned successor to the 911 Targa. We hear it's due in late 2014, and will switch to the original's removable roof panels.

    And there may even be a 911 Speedster this time round. Although unconfirmed, it would offer a chopped-screen version ideal for those in sunnier climes.

    Porsche-991-Cabriolet_Car-Magazine-link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    The cabrio looks really good and I'm happy they are sticking to the "soft" top look. kiss


    --

    2012 Cayenne S White/Espresso 

    Ex: 993 Targa, 986S, 986 and 964 C2


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    993Targa:

    The cabrio looks really good and I'm happy they are sticking to the "soft" top look. kiss

    Agreed, some body styles with long hoods and short flat roofs  ( MBZ SL/ SLK /Ferrari California )  look fine with body colored folding metal cab tops whatever the car's color , but the  long arcing  roof ,  thick C-pillar  and rear massing of  911 cab body style  looks odd with matching colored top ( see current 996/997 ones with the lift off hard top ) esp in bright colors like red or white , where a contrasting black fabric top visually lowers , lightens and lengthens the car visually.

     


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Yeah a body colored top would look stupid. It's cool that their updating the top to have functional superiority of a hard top, but the styling superiority of a soft top.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    pjd:

    bobr:


    Wonderbar:


    Anybody think Turbo might be shown in Geneva in March of 2012, with European deliveries in the summer and U.S. deliveries in late fall?  Probably early, but with Porsche's announced goal of selling 140,000 cars in 2012, and 200,000 by 2018, may we be seeing a different presentation schedule?




     The Turbo mules we are seeing in spy pictures look like they are pretty close to production cars.  Summer 2012  production makes sense. So fingers crossed for Geneva launch SmileySmiley




    Too early. 1st the Cab. versions (spring - Geneva), then C4 versions (summer - Paris). So Turbo maybe in Geneva but 2013





    Thats right. Porsche sales department confirmed the 991 Turbo for the German market exactly for July 2013 at the dealers.
    No secret about.
    --
    Kind regards, Conny 

    Porsche 997.2 Turbo S  *  BMW X5 M
     

    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Too bad Porsche is taking so long to introduce the 991 Turbo Cab - summer 2013 means we may not see it till fall or early winter 2013 in US. That's two years from now!!!!!!!!!!!Smiley


    --

    2006 997 C2S Cab, Triple Black,  2006 Cayenne Titanium Iceland Silver Metalic New York


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    2011 PORSCHE 911 GT3 R HYBRID 2.0 -- First Drive by Road and Track

    Ferocious, frugal, and a glimpse into Porsche’s hybrid future...

    (4 November 2011)

    It’s my birthday, and I had to work—and that was the best present ever. In this case, work meant skipping out on the Halloween parties for a trans-Atlantic flight to Portugal to test drive the appropriately pumpkin-colored Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid at the Circuito do Estoril.

    The Porsche factory development team was on hand to prep me for the once-in-a- lifetime experience of lapping the prototype race car at speed. Unlike the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup, or RSR, the Hybrid is not sold; it is purely a technology demonstrator and rolling test lab. That someone other than a Porsche factory driver is allowed to turn the wheel is a big deal, and also an indicator that there is a new car in development to replace it. Even the engineer responsible for Motorsport Development-Performance, Owen Hayes, hasn’t driven it. And he’s the guy explaining to me how the steering wheel’s 14 buttons and 6 knobs can adjust this all-wheel-drive hyper-drive hybrid from stable and predictable, to well…not. I try to remember the location of each knob and button, because I’m not going to take my eyes off the road in this $1 million test car.

    In The Car

    Mr. Hayes twirls his finger at me and I take a deep breath, which is challenging as I’m wedged into an OMP race seat complete with HANS device and 6-point Schroth belts. I press the start button. The chassis shivers to life like a wet dog fresh from a bath. Foot still on the clutch, I pull the intricately machined shift paddle with the fingers of my right hand. The large N displayed on the wheel switches to a 1. The red HYBRID MAP knob is set to 10, which means the system is off—unless I press the REKUP button to start manually charging the flywheel, or press the BOOST button to send power to the front wheels. In this mode, the Hybrid is purely a rear-drive Porsche GT3 R with 470 horsepower on tap from a 4.0-liter flat-6 race engine that makes earplugs an absolute necessity. I slowly let the clutch out to gracefully leave the pits without laying rubber.

    To the amusement of everyone, I stall it. This wasn’t unexpected. I’ve learned from driving a Porsche Cup car that finding the engagement point is a right of passage. Once found, the car chugs forward, and unlike in a Cup car, I won’t need the clutch again until I come back to the pits. All shifting of the dog-box 6-speed sequential is done via the paddles on the back of the custom steering wheel, made in-house for an estimated 5000 euros. A mechanical whine and gear lash resonate in the cabin, somewhat overshadowing the raucous flat-6. Not your everyday 911 here.

    With the pit lane speed limiter enabled I’m held at 35 mph in 2nd gear. I’m a habitual left-foot braker, so I take this time to shift my foot off the clutch and acclimate it to hovering over the massive brake pedal. Two feet fit on it comfortably. Interestingly, factory driver Jörg Bergmeister told me that the team prefers drivers to right-foot brake as it improves fuel economy.

    I’m not concerned with economy right now, and focus on entering the Estoril race track. I’m only a bit familiar with the course, thanks to YouTube videos and two laps in the passenger seat of a Carrera 4S piloted by Jörg. I think I know maybe two of the track’s 13 corners. Adrenaline flows and my nerves are lit up like the steering wheel’s shift lights. The engine tune we’re running today is allowing a redline of just over 9000 rpm and the majority of a lap is spent above a frantic 7000 rpm.

    Some of the stickiest Michelin rubber on the planet is beneath me. I’m cautious in the slightly damp conditions, but find the lateral grip superb. The (30/65-18 front, 31/71-18 rear) Michelin race slicks allow a staggering 1.5g of lateral grip, and that’s not a peak reading. This type of grip takes some getting used to, and I find myself progressively probing the limits and routinely coming up short in braking distance and corner entry speed. Better this than the alternative I suppose, but the car is capable of so much more. I think an entire day of lapping would be needed to acclimate.

    Full Flybrid Mode

    The fun truly begins as my radio clicks on and I’m instructed by Hayes to select HYBRID MAP 9. I feel for the red knob, visually check that I have the right one, and give it one click down. A slight deceleration is induced as the electric motors on the front axle create drag while generating the electricity needed to spool up the 30.9-lb. flywheel/motor in the passenger floor space. To allow for all-wheel drive, the front hubs are borrowed from a Panamera and have roughly a 6:1 gear reduction to the electric motor. Once the flywheel is up to 28,000 rpm, the onboard display reads 0 charge. A full charge of 100 requires 36,000 rpm. Without hearing protection, the 500-Hz hum of the system is deafening. It’s also surprisingly smooth, producing a mostly unnoticeable vibration.

    That’s amazing, when considering that the spinning mass is rigidly mounted to the chassis with a massive carbon-fiber backing plate for safety. If the flywheel fails, it will disintegrate into carbon dust inside the robust housing, while glass windows under it allow excess pressure to vent. This is to prevent the driver from being covered in a dust that resembles carbon-fiber brake rotor dust. (If you’ve ever seen a brake failure in an F1 race, you’ll know why Porsche wants to keep that stuff out of the cabin.) If something less catastrophic happens, such as a software glitch, the system can easily be rebooted while the car is in motion, or it can be disabled and de-coupled. This is accomplished via electronic clutches integrated into the gear reduction of the two front electric motors.

    Ignoring those contingency plans, I approach the main straight’s braking zone at 155 mph. I hit the big middle pedal and decelerate at just over 1g, slowing to 47 mph for turn 1. A quick check of the State of Charge lights and it’s clear I’ve generated flywheel energy. The SOC indicator looks like shift lights, but is below the digital display—it’s now at about 90 percent.

    The simple act of braking for turn 1 needs some explanation, as the brake pedal controls both hydraulic and regenerative braking systems. The brake pedal travel is slightly longer than that of a conventional race car. Front to rear balance is handled with a conventional brake balance bar on the pedal and adaptive ABS. When my foot first hits the brake the pedal sinks slightly until it hits something rock hard. In a standard race Porsche, the pedal is typically rock solid on the first touch. Pressure on the pedal determines deceleration, but the hybrid system wants that energy and thereby invokes the electric motors as generators. They begin immediately to absorb energy and spin up the flywheel. This means the hydraulic system needs less brake pressure to keep the braking force constant, so it pushes the brake pedal back slightly to unload the hydraulic system a commensurate amount. My pedal effort never changes, but I can feel through my foot the system kick in with a click. Nothing intrusive, mind you, but it lets you know that it’s working. Although the braking was phenomenal I wasn’t overly aggressive, seldom finding ABS. Bergmeister, however, told me that to be competitive it must be used.

    As is road-going hybrids, braking energy-regeneration puts less stress on the front brakes and so they last longer. This allows the 911 Hybrid race car to use lighter brake rotors if desired. In this case we’re running the thinner sprint rotors that were on the car at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca for the 6-hour enduro.

    Finding a Rhythm

    But I digress. Hitting turn 1’s apex with the flywheel near its maximum 36,000 rpm I’m charged (pun intended) for my first all-wheel-drive corner exit. I don’t have to hit the boost button to activate it, it’s pre-programmed for this track knowing approximate location on the track based on driven distance since it last crossed the start-finish line. I just have to hit the go pedal and it will apply the front power specific to that corner. Although adjustments can be made on the steering wheel to alter these settings, I’m not prepared to do that right now. I tip into the throttle and before I know it I’m snapping through the gears as the shift lights illuminate. I didn’t even feel the front wheels working. It wasn’t until the tight uphill right hand turn 3 that I felt the slight tug on the steering wheel that indicates the front axle putting power down. Before I had to be a little patient mid corner; now I can feel the twin 100-hp electric motors pulling the nose around, allowing me to use the right pedal sooner.

    The electric motors act independently on each wheel, and allow for torque vectoring. The exact amount is determined by the software, but it can also be tuned by the driver with the two yellow knobs at the bottom of the steering wheel, labeled TV IN and TV OUT. Regenerative braking can torque vector as well, so the system can drastically change how the car behaves on corner entry as well as exit. The EV MAP knob adjusts the ramp-up of power delivery by the electric motors. Bergmeister says he likes being able to adjust the car’s driving attitude without having to enter the pits, but points out that the system still can’t overcome worn tires.

    I find that an already well balanced and ultra responsive race car has become easier to drive. The stabilizing factor of all-wheel drive on corner exit is obvious, and the ability to put down another 200 horsepower at the front wheels makes the GT3 R Hybrid quicker out of corners. With a good flywheel charge, corner exits become violent and like turbo boost—addicting. But this is also where the Hybrid concept has its detractors. At best there is 6 to 8 seconds of boost to be had, with actual boost ebbing and flowing between corners, no two ever the same. Actual availability of boost is determined by the engineers and selected hybrid map. On the previous generation of the car, Version 1.0, the drivers made those determinations and all did it differently.

    To better optimize efficiency, the drivers are restricted to adjusting the lower four knobs on the steering wheel. The ENGINE MAP and TC MAP knobs are to be changed only by command of the race engineer. The driver focuses on going as quick as he can, while the engineers adjust the car to optimum frugality. When applied to endurance events such as the 6-hour ALMS race at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, this very car ran about 5 percent more efficiently than the competition. This means the Hybrid pitted three times compared to five for the competition, which allowed the car top dominate the GT class, although it was not competing for points. In endurance racing, having to make fewer pitstops is a huge advantage, particularly when you’re still capable of running fast laps.

    The GT3 RSRs that make up the Porsche GT field in the ALMS are the fundamental basis for the Hybrid, and the team had tried hard to build parity between the two models to create a better comparison. Racing against oneself is a sure way to find room for improvement. Version 2.0, the car I drove, is 110 lb. lighter than the previous Hybrid, thanks to a consolidation of the hybrid system and the removal of many extraneous body modifications. Stock GT3 R bodywork is used, and the side air vents and louvered fenders of its predecessor are not needed. A new water-to-oil cooler keeps the flywheel’s ceramic bearings at a cool 158 degrees F. That same water cools the power electronics and motors, via a radiator located in front of the conventional one for the engine.


    Heavy Hitter

    Overall, Version 2.0 of the Hybrid (2866 lb.) still carries an extra 220 lb. compared to the 2646-lb. GT3 R race car from which it’s derived. The majority of that extra weight is over the front axle, providing a more even weight distribution compared to a typical 911. Not surprisingly, this has necessitated larger front tires, 30/65-18 compared to 27/65-18 on the GT3 R.

    All told, the hybrid system, by itself, adds 331 lb to the GT3 R, but creative engineering has helped the team shed 110 lb. in other places. Two examples: the 12-volt lithium-ion battery is borrowed from the RS Spyder, and the roof is made of magnesium and is 11 lb. lighter than the steel one it replaces. Of note, the exotic roof came from Porsche R&D, which experiments with alternative materials.

    As I clip apexes and drive more confidently out of each corner, it’s easy to imagine myself doing a 1-hour stint. Unfortunately, my time is up much too soon. Like going to Disneyland on your birthday, the best rides end too quickly. Hayes gets on the radio, telling me to select HYBRID MAP 11 and begin discharging the flywheel system on the cool-down lap. The frenzy is over, and I take a moment to finally blink.

    Looking Ahead...

    At dinner, I bring up a spy photo of a street-going GT3 with Hybrid 1.0 bodywork, shot at a gas station in Germany. According to Daniel Armbruster, manager Motorsport Development –Systems, that is the car used by System Engineers Christoph Seelbach and Jens Maurer to tweak the hybrid drive software. Its flywheel is mounted where the rear seats would be, which allows a passenger seat. While one engineer drives, the other adjusts the programming on a laptop using Simulink software from MathLab. This way, the team can rapidly make changes.

    Spy Shots: Porsche 911 GT3 Hybrid

    We’d love to see a version of this flywheel hybrid system in a street car, but there are some challenges. The first is noise and vibration from the flywheel—the hum it makes is like that of a turbine engine on a jet liner. That’s fine for a race car (say, a future 918), but obnoxious in a street car. That said, a Porsche board member has driven the car and liked it, so I’m hopeful that the team’s denial of this technology being used in a street car is all a ruse. Next year, when the GT3 variant of the new 991 chassis is introduced, I hope to see a hybrid option. Never thought I’d say that...

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 - Road and Track - Article link

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 - Road and Track - Gallery link

    2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 - Road and Track - Video link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    2013 Porsche 911 Spy Video...

    2013 Porsche 911 Spy Video - Inside Line - video link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 -- First Drive by Autoblog

    A Flywheel-Equipped Race Car Leaves Us Whirring for More...

    Spinning at 36,000 revolutions per minute just two feet from my right thigh, a 31-pound flywheel is screaming like a five-horsepower Shop-Vac with the filter removed. The sound pierces the composite shell of my racing helmet and drills through my form-fitted foam earplugs before painfully slamming into my eardrums.

    Yet despite the aching annoyance, I welcome and embrace the high-pitched drone. It means, in the simplest terms, that the monster inside this ballistic carbon fiber cocoon is not only awake, but completely energized.

    With a stab of the throttle, the kinetic energy in the spinning flywheel is automatically exchanged for electricity - the charged ions power two strong electric motors on the front axle. Instantaneously bestowed with 200 torque-laden horsepower, the sticky Michelin slicks claw at the pavement with a vengeance. I clench the wheel as the carbon-fiber bodied race car lunges forward with more accelerative force than an F-16 fighter jet at takeoff power.

    Welcome to the driver's seat of the Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0.

    Peer high up on Porsche's performance ladder, above the two-dozen or so street legal 911 models - above even the GT2 - to find the automaker's most competitive cars. Vehicles bred purposely for the track.

    The Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is one such model. Compared to its predecessor, which debuted last year, the second-generation hybrid is 20 percent lighter and more efficient without any concession to lap times. While sharing the same paint scheme, the new vehicle is easily identified by its lack of intakes in front of each rear wheel - changes to engine cooling allowed the slats to be dropped and aerodynamic efficiency improved.

      

    Beneath the orange, white, silver and black wrap, the GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 features a monocoque body of hot-galvanized steel with a welded roll cage. Body panels are carbon fiber and there are lightweight polycarbonate windows on all sides, including the front windshield. At each corner is a height-adjustable suspension with dual coil springs and Sachs gas-pressure fixed-position dampers. The steering rack is power-assisted, with an electro-hydraulic pressure feed, and there is a car-mounted air-jack system for use in the pits.

    With help from Bosch MS 4.0 engine management and a race exhaust system, the gas engine is tuned to develop 470 horsepower.

    At the front are six-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 15-inch ventilated iron rotors. The rear features four-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 14-inch ventilated iron rotors and there are optimized brake ducts aimed at all four to ensure sufficient cooling. Compared to the standard GT3 Cup (which we drove earlier this year), the wheel/tire package on the GT3 R Hybrid is wider to accommodate the extra workload of the tires. The front and rear wheels are one-piece Rays forged aluminum alloy (11.5x18 and 13x18, respectively) with a single central-locking nut, while dry compound Michelin Porsche Cup N1 slicks tires come standard (30/65-18 front and 31/71-18 rear).

    Hung behind the rear wheels of the 997 GT3 R Hybrid is a very traditional race-bred gasoline-consuming flat six-cylinder engine. Displacing 4.0-liters, the naturally aspirated four-valve powerplant features multi-point fuel injection and dry sump lubrication. With help from Bosch MS 4.0 engine management and a race exhaust system, the gas engine is tuned to develop 470 horsepower. The standard transmission is a six-speed sequential dog-type gearbox. There is an aluminum clutch pedal on the floor (controlling the triple-plate carbon clutch), but no transmission lever to the right of the driver. Instead, shifting is accomplished via small aluminum paddles on the backside of the steering wheel. A mechanically-locking rear axle differential completes the rear-mounted driveline.

      

      

    Things become very interesting at this point - the GT3 R Hybrid has a completely independent second driveline in the front of the chassis.

    Located just to the right of the driver, where a passenger seat would normally be situated, is a large charcoal gray carbon fiber case. At first glance it appears to be a fuel cell, yet the ominous bright yellow "high voltage" warning sticker and large air ducts feeding cool atmospheric air tell a different story. Porsche engineers reveal that a 31-pound composite flywheel, mounted horizontally on oil-cooled ceramic bearings, is buried deep inside. It is called a flywheel accumulator.

    The GT3 R Hybrid has a completely independent second driveline in the front of the chassis.

    A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device used to store energy. Unlike nearly every hybrid gasoline-electric vehicle on the market today, which require batteries or capacitors to store electricity, the GT3 R Hybrid uses a spinning flywheel mounted on an electric motor/generator. It's a brilliant solution, as a vacuum-encased flywheel unit is not only lighter than a battery pack but is capable of being fully "charged" (accelerated to its maximum speed) and "discharged" (decelerated to a near stop) multiple times a minute without adverse affects - batteries and capacitors would quickly overheat rendering them nearly useless after a short period of such abuse.

    Mounted directly to the steel chassis, the flywheel is generally spinning between 28,000 to 36,000 rpm (it is rated to 40,000 rpm). When the hybrid system is activated, the flywheel is charged automatically under braking by two permanently excited synchronous motors that reverse their function to send electrical current to the flywheel motor (the driver may also charge/discharge the system via a steering wheel-mounted button while coasting or even under acceleration). In layman's terms, normally wasted heat (energy) in braking is converted to electricity and sent back to the pavement when accelerating out of a corner or overtaking another race car via twin 75 kW (101 horsepower) motors located on the front driveshaft.

      

    As mentioned, the hybrid drivetrain in the front of the chassis is completely independent of the combustion drivetrain mounted in the rear. This means the GT3 R Hybrid is capable of racing exclusively in rear-wheel drive mode with the hybrid system shut down. Of course, it may also resort to electrical front-wheel drive to limp back to the pits in an emergency. Versatility is an understatement.

    The all-wheel-drive Porsche GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 will accelerate to 60 mph in about 2.5 seconds.

    With a curb weight of just 2,866 pounds and a total system power of 672 horsepower, the all-wheel-drive Porsche GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 will accelerate to 60 mph in about 2.5 seconds. Its top speed is gearing limited to about 175 mph.

    Showcasing Porsche's technology, the second-generation GT3 R Hybrid has been very busy. In June, it competed impressively (despite a last-minute restriction) during the 24 Hours of Nürburgring. In September, it wowed the crowds while competing in an exhibition class during an American Le Mans Series (ALMS) race at Laguna Seca - it outran the entire GT class as it didn't have to pit as frequently. And in October, it was on display for tens of thousands of fans during Porsche's Rennsport Reunion IV.

    Autódromo Fernanda Pires da Silva - the famed Estoril race circuit - is located about a dozen miles west of Lisbon, Portugal. The 2.6-mile road course offers drivers an excellent challenge thanks to its hairpins, elevation changes and long front straight. Although out of the spotlight and frequently forgotten (it was dropped from the Formula One calendar more than a decade ago), the venue remains a world-class facility.

      

      

    Today, the track serves a very noble purpose - a fully-fueled race-ready Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is in the hot pits, and Autoblog enjoys a rare opportunity to spend some time behind the wheel.

    Arriving at the circuit a couple hours early, the first order of business is a track orientation lap with Jörg Bergmeister in a bone-stock 997 911 C4S. The track is wet from an overnight rain, but the former Grand-American Rolex Series Champion doesn't seem to notice. Despite being completely disheartened and now more nervous than ever, I shake it off and head over to the Porsche trailer to suit up. Ten minutes later I emerge wearing all of my fireproof gear and carrying my helmet and HANS Device (upgraded with a sliding tether system) under my arm. I grab a sugar-free Red Bull and march over to the hot pits.

    I check in just as the GT3 R Hybrid enters the far side of pit lane. Despite being a full two hundred yards away, it is unmistakable with its distinctive white and orange bodywork. Sitting fat and low on the tarmac, its yellow headlights glare piercingly at me as it cackles through each downshift. It is damn intimidating.

    The ignition is killed and the two beady eyes are extinguished, breaking its stare. The Porsche quietly rolls to a stop in front of me.

      

      

    Climbing into a race car with a full cage and not looking like a complete tool requires some planning. As I am six-foot two-inches tall, I put my helmet and HANS on first (most cockpits don't have enough room to lift it cleanly over my head). This means tiny foam earbuds, each with miniature speakers, go into my ears and a Nomex balaclava is slid over my head before my helmet. With the steering wheel removed, I swing both legs over the side intrusion beam, grab the top of the cage with both hands and gently drop myself into the racing bucket. The carbon fiber seat is thinly padded with fire-resistant upholstery, but the thickness of my Nomex suit adds a bit more cushioning. It is tight, but comfortable. With my arms raised, two crew members reach across the cabin and strap all six buckles into the quick release latch just below my beltline. I cinch each as tight as I can while one of the crew attaches the communication electronics jack. I'm ready to roll.

    The $6,000 interface appears more sophisticated than the instrument panel on an Apollo command module.

    Pre-flight instruction is short, but critical. Nearly all of the primary instrumentation and controls, with the exception of the brake, accelerator and clutch, are located on a flat carbon-fiber panel of the thick suede-wrapped steering wheel. As a result, the $6,000 interface appears more sophisticated than the instrument panel on an Apollo command module. Truth is, there are only a few buttons/switches that require attention as most of the R Hybrid is automated - nearly everything on the face of the wheel is for driver override. Most critical today is the small "Hybrid Map" wheel, at about 7 o'clock in relation to the Porsche crest in the center of the hub. The twelve adjustable-on-the-fly settings change hybrid boost from full auto to system discharge.

    Some factory drivers prefer manual control of boost and energy recuperation, so there are buttons for that ("Boost" and "Rekup") and buttons to alter system torque vectoring ("TV IN" and "TV OUT"). Of course, the traction control ("TC MAP") and engine ("ENGINE MAP") are also cockpit-adjustable. Lastly are two rows of bright LEDs. The top row displays engine revolutions, while the bottom shows the flywheel's state of charge ("SOC"). Confused? Yeah, me too.

    After a brief radio check, a crew member flips the console-mounted main ignition switch ("MAIN SWITCH") and I receive the signal to hold down the engine start button ("STARTER"). The tuned 4.0-liter flat-six takes a sip of fuel and ignites immediately. A rough idle shakes the chassis while the concussions from the anxious exhaust bounce of the pit walls.

    I'm the only car on the circuit, and all eyes are on me.

    With the clutch to the floor, I pull back on the right paddle to engage first gear. The big LCD on the steering wheel confirms my choice. Despite gingerly lifting my left leg and feathering a bit of throttle with my right, the engine stalls - a common occurrence (thankfully, the clutch is only used to break inertia). Without skipping a beat I again stab the start button, apply more throttle and cleanly roll out of the pits towards the wide-open track. I'm the only car on the circuit, and all eyes are on me.

    The hybrid system is shut completely off (via the "HYBRID" master switch) during the first couple laps so I am able to orient myself with the chassis and handling without distraction. Despite the electronic castration, the Porsche is still sending 470 horsepower to the rear wheels. I drive guarded, at maybe five-tenths, to get a feel for the brakes, turn-in and available grip. There is plenty of power and the track is still damp. All it takes is a slight goose of the accelerator and the coupe squiggles on the asphalt as the cold rear tires lose grip. Braking is a bit unnerving as the pedal travels a bit then stops - one has to press the seemingly frozen pedal impossibly hard. After a couple minutes, the radio call comes to bring me back into the pits.

    Stopped a minute later with the engine shut down, the driver's door opens and the very patient man at the other end of the radio is waiting. He is Owen Hayes, Porsche's GT3 R Hybrid chief engineer and my personal Obi-Wan Kenobi for the test drive. Owen leans in and flips "ON" the master switch for the hybrid system, moves the hybrid map to "10" and then gives me the signal to head back out.

    I had been warned that the hybrid system would make the GT3 R feel sluggish during its initial charge, but I had underestimated the effect. After half a lap, following several regenerative braking cycles, the heavy front wheels magically lighten. At about the same moment a strange sound begins to emerge from the right side of the cabin - the flywheel had finally come alive. The noise starts as a smooth electric whir, but it soon becomes a deafening howl accompanied by a high-frequency vibration.

    The game is completely changed.

    There is no need to look at the bank of LEDs, now fully illuminated, to verify the flywheel's charge as the noise tells me all I need to know. Passing the apex of the next corner I mash the throttle and hold on. Thanks to a very sophisticated torque vectoring system, power is sent precisely to the wheel that needs to maintain optimal cornering around the radius. With more than 200 horsepower now being pushed through the front wheels, I expect massive torque steer. Nothing of the sort rears its ugly head, and the steering balance remains just as smooth and precise as before. Dynamically, and as expected, the grip up front reduces oversteer and the Porsche magically pulls itself out of the corner as if tethered behind a Nautique ski boat.

    Boost is short lived, no more than eight seconds with a full charge, but it's plenty of time to exit most corners with energy still remaining in the flywheel. Foot to the floorboards, the GT3 R Hybrid launches itself out of the hole quicker than any street car. The power pins my body against the back of the seat with insane levels of thrust (at one point, telemetry reveals that the GT3 R Hybrid is accelerating in third gear through 77 mph with an unbelievable .8 g's of acceleration). The power is stupefying, and I readily admit that I have never driven anything this quick, on or off a track.

    The hybrid's flywheel boost provides an instant 40 percent increase in vehicle power for those fleeting seconds. The acceleration pattern almost reminds me of my high school days when we'd plumb nitrous oxide (NO2) into our engines for a quick hit - but there is no high pressure tank to run dry this time. Aggressively apply the brakes and the system recharges automatically.

    The ground still shows large patches of moisture on the track. Yet the warm Michelin race tires brush off the laws of physics and stick to the pavement as if they are covered in hot glue. This is good, as it quickly builds my trust in the vehicle. Within minutes my braking is exceeding 1.2 g and my cornering forces approach 1.5 g. I am pushing hard, but still off the pace of the seasoned pros. The GT3 R Hybrid is laughing at me, asking for more.

    My body is being slammed back and forth between the carbon-fiber seat and nylon restraints violently, but everything is happening so fast that it's of little concern. Holding my hands on the wheel, my fingers flick up and down through the gears. Overwhelmed, I focus only on shifting, braking, steering... and breathing.

    I can hear the 31-pound flywheel, locked inside its prison chamber to my right, screaming under deceleration and then relieving itself as I accelerate. The pattern is rhythmic, and its wail blocks out the soothing roar of the flat-six and the mechanical whine of the straight cut gears. It is terrifyingly noisy.

    Overwhelmed, I focus only on shifting, braking, steering... and breathing.

    Two good straights, nearly evenly placed apart on the circuit, give me a chance to relax my grip on the wheel and enjoy a strong blast of fresh air from the vent cut into the exterior mirror. The Porsche will hit about 135 mph on the back section in sixth gear, and I see a consistent 155 mph in the same gear on the front straight if I exit the corners properly (still running the transmission ratios and suspension settings for Laguna Seca, the orange and white race car will need taller gears to go much faster).

    A couple laps later, Owen comes on over the communicator and tells me it is time to pit on the next lap. He instructs me to switch to hybrid map "11," which will drain the flywheel while I am on the track (it can also be done in pits, by raising the front end and allowing the wheels to spin off the energy). I crave more time behind the wheel, but part of me is relived as I am both physically and mentally drained. Keep in mind that I've only been in the car for about 20 minutes.

      

    Coming off the last corner, I shift the gearbox into neutral and roll the GT3 R Hybrid the last few hundred feet. As I stop, Owen opens the door and kills the ignition. A member of the pit crew attaches an air line to pneumatically raise the Porsche off the ground while other members of the crew immediately start to remove the wheels. Another plugs a dump can into the dry break valve on the hood and splashes in more Panta racing fuel. I unbuckle and muster the strength to climb out through the labyrinth of roll cage. Once clear, I remove my helmet. Standing in the hot pits and taking in the welcomed silence, I realize that I am not only completely soaked with sweat, but I am completely exhausted.

    The GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is absolutely spectacular, yet Porsche is still chasing perfection.

    Minutes later, while gulping down a cold orange juice in the garage (and waiting for my pulse to drop below 165), I find myself almost speechless. The GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is absolutely spectacular, yet Porsche is still chasing perfection.

    Last year's model, the first-generation, relied on the driver to control recoup and boost. However, Porsche found that each of its drivers would use the hybrid system differently and this caused inconsistency in tire wear and fuel economy. The engineers tried a GPS-based boost program (it would "learn" the track and provide boost at the proper moment), but satellite-based positioning doesn't work when passing slower vehicles off the racing line. The solution was the current automated system to deliver boost to the front wheels based on throttle position and other sensors. This works well most of the time, but there are situations when drivers don't need the boost (e.g., exiting a corner behind slow traffic), preferring it to remain stored in the flywheel until passing. Porsche drivers still use the manual overrides in these situations, admit the engineers.

    There is also an interesting phenomenon that occurs during braking. Under initial brake application, the hybrid's regenerative system produces heavy drag as it is diligently electrifying the flywheel motor. However, once the flywheel has absorbed its maximum energy (at about 36,000 rpm) it abruptly shuts off - the drag on the front wheels is eliminated and the vehicle shoots forward under standard braking force. The driver has to anticipate this switchover, or they will find themselves overshooting the entry, or worse go right into the wall.

    The Porsche GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is a clear look at the next-generation of exhilarating personal hybrid transportation.

    Peculiarities out of the way, Porsche's hybrid system works very, very well. But as of now, the GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 still hasn't raced for a spot on the podium. Its unique hybrid powertrain leaves it a bit ostracized, without a class in which to compete. Today's game-changing hybrid race car remains nothing but a very fast proof-of-concept. But don't expect that to dissuade Porsche, an automaker obsessed with winning. Revealed earlier this year was the 918 RSR Hybrid - also fitted with a flywheel accumulator - expected to mark the brand's return to the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2014.

    Thankfully, crash helmets and Nomex suits won't always be required to pilot a vehicle equipped with a flywheel accumulator. The technology not only promises a clean, safe, lightweight, environmentally friendly and completely self-contained alternative to battery storage, but it delivers fun-to-drive free boost. I am convinced that the Porsche GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 isn't just a glimpse at the future of racing - it's a clear look at the next-generation of exhilarating personal hybrid transportation. Maybe it's time for the Prius, and its numb clones, to finally move aside...

    Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 -- Specifications:

    Engine: 4.0L Flat-6, 75 kW x2
    Power: 672 HP (total)
    Transmission: 6-Speed Sequential
    0-60 Time: 2.5 Seconds (est.)
    Top Speed: 175 mph (est.)
    Drivetrain: All-Wheel Drive
    Curb Weight: 2,866 Pounds
    Seating: 1
    MSRP: $1.5 Million (est.)

    Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 -- Track Video

    Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 - Autoblog article link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    According to Marshall Pruett (Sportscar Racing Editor for SPEED) Porsche have "parked" the GT3 Hybrid in September in order to work on the 918 RSR Hybrid Project. If this is true, then Porsche seem to want to develop the 918 RSR Hybrid as an interim development car before embarking on the LMP1.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    "PORSCHE DELAYS ENTRY-LEVEL MODEL..."

    -- Interview with Porsche CEO, Matthias Mueller (by FT Deutschland)

    A small exclusive sports car at an entry price of less than €40,000?  Porsche CEO Mueller hesitates and says why in an interview with the FT Deutschland why...

    (14 November 2011)

    The Porsche management hesitates to build a small sports car with a starting price of possibly less than €40,000. "There is no decision to develop this car into production," Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller said in FTD conversation during the presentation of the new 911 Carrera model in the California town of Santa Barbara.
     
    "The decision is due soon, but they may well drag on into next year." If Porsche opt for a small two-seater Boxster below, this would be the earliest, according to Mueller in late summer 2014, but rather later on the market.
     
    Mueller had been a little Porsche for beginners only hinted at. Now he calls the first possible dates. Industry observers had speculated that a decision could still fall this year.
     
     
     
    Porsche sales by region from January to October (2010 vs 2011)
     
    This is obviously not yet come. According to Müller, Porsche can do without the small sports car to the sales target from the current 100 000 to double by 2018 to at least 200,000 vehicles. "This figure will be achieved without the sixth or seventh series." With products like the new 911 and planned for 2013 compact SUV Cajun as well as growth in emerging markets and expanding the dealer network should make the Porsche 200,000 units, said Mueller.
     
    Porsche offers four product lines: In addition to the 911 and the Boxster, that are the Cayenne SUV and the sedan Panamera. The fifth is added the Cajun. A little Boxster would complement its product range to the bottom. A venture into the Zuffenhausen attractive price points could open up new target groups sports car manufacturer.
     
    Mueller would thus also maintain the balance between exclusivity and mass market. "We're determined to maintain the price premium," said the CEO. "Porsche wants and will not be a volume brand." With an operating margin of at least 15 percent and a return on investment of at least 21 percent will remain Porsche's most profitable company in the world.
     
    The 58-year-old Porsche CEO was last week with the Chief Development Officer Wolfgang Hatz, in California. At the presentation before the European launch of the new 911, Porsche test driver Walter Röhrl was there. The Golden State is, according to Smith "second home" of 911 - Porsche sold anywhere in the world car of the series more than here.
     
    Part 2: The conditions for a small two-seater
     
    Before Porsche chooses the small two-seater, have several questions to be answered. "For us, profitability and job security in the forefront," said Mueller. "We first clarify how the car would fit into our entire product range, which we have development capabilities and how the sites are busy."
     
    Important in choosing new series is especially the global economic situation. "The financial crisis is real and we must now see to what extent it creates an economic crisis," said Mueller. "If there was one, and so it would at least lead to a slowdown in the automotive business, then this would of course inevitably impact on our strategy."
     
    The manufacturer does not even feel weak economy. Already in the first ten months, he has the objective set for 2011 mark by more than 100,000 cars sold exceeded. However, Mueller expressed skepticism: "We are very vigilant and must assume that there must be at least 2012, a slowdown and that it also could be affected by the premium segment."
     
    Porsche should produce cheaper models at its home base and still achieve the performance targets can be: "If we put together such a package, then it must be possible with Germany." Want to categorically rule out a relocation Mueller does not.
     
    Porsche would have to rethink also should proceed important markets protectionist. As China, where Porsche sells a third of its cars now and so far well cope with the situation. "Before one gives so a market up, would have to make you look at the question of whether to build but not in China, a local production," said Mueller.

    Porsche CEO Matthias Muller -- FT Germany interview -- Article link (NB: original article in German)

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Hi!

    Does anybody know if Carrera 4 models will get a even wider body?

    Next question : Will there a red stripe at the back or not ?

     

    Official pics in 6 months ... so there should be mules already outside ......

     

    Best regards

    Gregor


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Spyderidol:

    According to Marshall Pruett (Sportscar Racing Editor for SPEED) Porsche have "parked" the GT3 Hybrid in September in order to work on the 918 RSR Hybrid Project. If this is true, then Porsche seem to want to develop the 918 RSR Hybrid as an interim development car before embarking on the LMP1.

     It seems that Porsche is using the GT3 Hybrid  for promotional purposes as opposed to a pure developement platform. . There are a number of members of the automotive press who have been given the opporutnity to drive this car. 


    --

    2006 997 C2S Cab, Triple Black,  2006 Cayenne Titanium Iceland Silver Metalic New York


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Sidney:
    Does anybody know if Carrera 4 models will get a even wider body? [...]

    Official pics in 6 months ... so there should be mules already outside ......


    Take a look at page 3 of this thread, Porsche will definitely unveil a widebody version for Carrera models and the Turbo. Unless they establish the GTS as a regular model it is safe to assume that it is intended for the AWD models.

    Smiley


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Info from my P source in todays email: "...since new Cabrio is introduced today you can expect that Carrera 4/4S and Turbo models to be introduces sooner then anticipated. In 2012 you will probably see the intro of Boxster/Cayman, Carrera4/4S and Turbo. Of course, sale of some of these models will start in early 2013."

    More interesting he wrote that new GT3 may be little later then expected...


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Dear KresoF1

    could we imagine that Carrera 4/4S will be presented in spring 2012?

    and Turbo in autumn 2012?

    when will we see GT3 then? in 2013?

     


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    KresoF1:

    Info from my P source in todays email: "...since new Cabrio is introduced today you can expect that Carrera 4/4S and Turbo models to be introduces sooner then anticipated. In 2012 you will probably see the intro of Boxster/Cayman, Carrera4/4S and Turbo. Of course, sale of some of these models will start in early 2013."

    More interesting he wrote that new GT3 may be little later then expected...

    Hopefully the GT3 is delayed, so that they can finish developing the Flat-8 and a better steering systemSmiley


    --

    73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs).  Former: 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550 Maranello


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Grant, most likely GT3 is delayed bacause of final gearbox choice. I heard that new PDK-S is not yet fully ready...

    BTW, steering complaines are probably overrated as much as possible, at least IMHO.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    KresoF1:

    Grant, most likely GT3 is delayed bacause of final gearbox choice. I heard that new PDK-S is not yet fully ready...

    BTW, steering complaines are probably overrated as much as possible, at least IMHO.

    Thanks!  Do you think the manual 7spd (and PDK-S)  for the GT3 will have 7 performance gears (rather than a 7th for fuel economy)?


    --

    73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs).  Former: 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550 Maranello


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    Grant, that is an excellent question. Answer is rather difficult at the moment... It will pretty much depend on new GT3 engine technical design. If it will be a extreme high rev unit a la Ferrari 458 then 7th "power" gear makes sense in very way(because it will mask initial low torque at low revs). BUT, if new GT3 engine will be in its power delivery a la latest 4.0 GT1 block based unit then I do not see true need for 7th "power" gear.

    Also, since many GT3 users actually track from time to time their cars pretty long first and second gear may be an advantage on the track. With 7th "power" gear that advantage will be gone since most likely first five gears will be much shorter.

    My bet is that new GT3 will use ONLY one gearbox choice-either manual or PDK-S. So, if it is PDK-S chances for 7th "power" gear are 50/50 at the moment.


    Re: 991 spyshots thread (continued) (for UNRELEASED models only) Thread Closed

    KresoF1:

    My bet is that new GT3 will use ONLY one gearbox choice-either manual or PDK-S.

    Why do you say this? It would be a wrong move  not to offer both.


    --

    "Form follows function"


     
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