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    TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

     Hey folks, James just finished installing the first kit TechArt nose-lift kit in the US today on a customer's EVT700 997TT. It's a pretty elaborate set up, including a hydraulic pump, plenty of lines, couplers and electronics as well as a nifty home-link switch replacement. Dan whipped up a demonstration video featuring our chief scientist and test pilot behind the wheel.

    YouTube - TechArt noselift kit on 700HP Porsche @ SharkWerks

    We've got a lot more to do on this car (including a full Type II conversion) so it's back to work. For those of you interested in purchasing a kit and for more information check out:

    http://www.sharkwerks.com/products.php?pid=211

    Here's a few pix of the installation process starting off with all the parts (and there's a lot of them):

    The all-important pump and battery tray (very neatly put together I must say):

     

     

    Here's one retro-fitted with the techart kit (top) and regular coilover (bottom):

     

     

    In she goes back into the front: The hydraulic lines need to be run careful and secured out of the way: Much of the front trunk area needs to be removed etc.. In goes the battery tray and pump Out comes the homelink panel..

    And the switch panel (a lot of wiring etc...)


    --
    www.sharkwerks.com


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

     Thanks for the info on the kit. Just wondering, and may be a stupid question, was the wiring to the front overhead switch panel there already, or did you have to somehow magically run a cable up there from the battery tray?


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    How does it work; do you hit a button, nose lifts, and then after some time it drops again, or above a certain speed it drops? Or do you need to lower it manually again? If so, that could cause soem serious understeering at high speeds, I think, or not?


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    VERY cool. Thanks Alex. Smiley

    Vid done perfectly too.  Nice job.


    --

    08 PORSCHE Turbo Cabriolet, 06 Ferrari F430,  04 Durango HEMI,  04 Harley Davidson Screamin Eagle,  93 Harley Davidson Nostalgia

     


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    x838nwy:

     Thanks for the info on the kit. Just wondering, and may be a stupid question, was the wiring to the front overhead switch panel there already, or did you have to somehow magically run a cable up there from the battery tray?

    Hey there my pleasure and TechArt provides some wiring etc... and we have to do some work to get it to work with the garage door opener but it works;)


    --
    www.sharkwerks.com

    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    Joost:

    How does it work; do you hit a button, nose lifts, and then after some time it drops again, or above a certain speed it drops? Or do you need to lower it manually again? If so, that could cause soem serious understeering at high speeds, I think, or not?

    You just touch the button to raise it and lower it. If you drive faster than 39mph it automatically lowers itself right away. There's no way to drive faster than that with the car raised.


    --
    www.sharkwerks.com

    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley


    --

    fritz


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

    Hi Fritz, good eye etc... but that's the way it was designed to work although TechArt's been using/installing this system on their cars for a while now etc...


    --
    www.sharkwerks.com

    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    As close as a 911 will ever get to becoming to a "low rider", albeit in slow motion.......


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

     We also do the Cargraphic version as endorsed by Walter Rohl;)


    --
    www.sharkwerks.com

    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    pretty great stuff, there is a lambo in my friends condo garage that looks like it goes up 2-3 inches.


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

    fritz, very interesting point as always.


    --

    Regards,
    Can
    997 Turbo + Bilstein Damptronic ( Review and Pictures ) + ECU Tune ( ??? ) + Cargraphic Exhaust ( Oh heavenly noise! )


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    cannga:
    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

    fritz, very interesting point as always.

    Well, fritz knows what he knows. Smiley Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor 997 Turbo, Cayenne Turbo S, BMW M3 Cab DKG, Mini Cooper S JCW


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

     

    I'm pretty sure I posted this, but may be it didn't...

    My guess would be that they put it at the bottom to load the annular cylinder as evenly a possible. If they put it at the top, it'd be around the top mount where there's likely to be some rotation of the strut's axis relative to the top mount and may cause the cylinder to be loaded more on one side than another. The rotation is probably quite large since we're extending the shock by quite a long way (50mm?)

    Having it under the springs might help spread the load a bit more. May be i'm totally wrong...


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    x838nwy:
    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

     

    I'm pretty sure I posted this, but may be it didn't...

    My guess would be that they put it at the bottom to load the annular cylinder as evenly a possible. If they put it at the top, it'd be around the top mount where there's likely to be some rotation of the strut's axis relative to the top mount and may cause the cylinder to be loaded more on one side than another. The rotation is probably quite large since we're extending the shock by quite a long way (50mm?)

    Having it under the springs might help spread the load a bit more. May be i'm totally wrong...

    There is a bearing at the top of the strut which allows both rotation of the damper relative to its mounting during steering and the angular changes of the damper axis to this mounting due to bump and rebound. If any angular non-alignment of the damper shaft to the damper cylinder were to be possible, the sealing of the damper piston would be the first thing to be compromised. 


    --

    fritz


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    fritz:
    x838nwy:
    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

     

    I'm pretty sure I posted this, but may be it didn't...

    My guess would be that they put it at the bottom to load the annular cylinder as evenly a possible. If they put it at the top, it'd be around the top mount where there's likely to be some rotation of the strut's axis relative to the top mount and may cause the cylinder to be loaded more on one side than another. The rotation is probably quite large since we're extending the shock by quite a long way (50mm?)

    Having it under the springs might help spread the load a bit more. May be i'm totally wrong...

    There is a bearing at the top of the strut which allows both rotation of the damper relative to its mounting during steering and the angular changes of the damper axis to this mounting due to bump and rebound. If any angular non-alignment of the damper shaft to the damper cylinder were to be possible, the sealing of the damper piston would be the first thing to be compromised. 

     

    Just under the ball joint at the top, there's a piece of rubber/plastic spring hat (just so we're calling the same thing the same thing - a something that transfers the load from the shock to mount to the spring, I think it's black in the photo). IIRC, this piece is flexible on the damper shaft and as such may not be always exactly aligned to it. If this piece loads springs, it's not a problem, but it might be if it loads the air cylinder.

    Perhaps I didn't make myself very clear - I didn't mean that the damper shaft becomes misaligned with the damper body, just that the top of the springs could be at times b/c of the hat. We're not talking of huge misalignments here, just a tiny bit. The air cylinder is unlikely to incorporate much in terms of guides and seals (because of it's size, mainly) so it's probably quite sensitive to alignment/how it's loaded.


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

    x838nwy:
    fritz:
    x838nwy:
    fritz:

    Is there any particular reason why the lift cylinders are fitted below the springs, where they add to unsprung weight, instead of above the springs where they would less harmfully (in terms of road-wheel control) add to sprung weight?   Smiley

     

    I'm pretty sure I posted this, but may be it didn't...

    My guess would be that they put it at the bottom to load the annular cylinder as evenly a possible. If they put it at the top, it'd be around the top mount where there's likely to be some rotation of the strut's axis relative to the top mount and may cause the cylinder to be loaded more on one side than another. The rotation is probably quite large since we're extending the shock by quite a long way (50mm?)

    Having it under the springs might help spread the load a bit more. May be i'm totally wrong...

    There is a bearing at the top of the strut which allows both rotation of the damper relative to its mounting during steering and the angular changes of the damper axis to this mounting due to bump and rebound. If any angular non-alignment of the damper shaft to the damper cylinder were to be possible, the sealing of the damper piston would be the first thing to be compromised. 

     

    Just under the ball joint at the top, there's a piece of rubber/plastic spring hat (just so we're calling the same thing the same thing - a something that transfers the load from the shock to mount to the spring, I think it's black in the photo). IIRC, this piece is flexible on the damper shaft and as such may not be always exactly aligned to it. If this piece loads springs, it's not a problem, but it might be if it loads the air cylinder.

    Perhaps I didn't make myself very clear - I didn't mean that the damper shaft becomes misaligned with the damper body, just that the top of the springs could be at times b/c of the hat. We're not talking of huge misalignments here, just a tiny bit. The air cylinder is unlikely to incorporate much in terms of guides and seals (because of it's size, mainly) so it's probably quite sensitive to alignment/how it's loaded.

    I haven't been able to find a good cross-sectional drawing of a McPhersoon strut to demonstrate it, but in fact the spring hat you refer to above is a stiff metal component which is rigidly fixed to the upper damper tube. It has to withstand the full shock forces passed on by the spring to the car body, so it could not be allowed to be flexible. There is a pivot bush above that which has some compliance in road cars.

    On the competition damper shown here the top of the damper spring would bear on the black inverted hat shown. The bottom of the spring would bear on the flange shown on the threaded tube, and the lock nut would be tightened up to it.The concentric cylinder of a lift cylinder could be laid out to be mounted instead of the hat at the top, or above the nuts at the bottom. 

    The pivot bush (ball joint in this case) fits directly under the gray nut at the top of the shaft.

    bilstein.jpg

     



    --

    fritz


    Re: TechArt Noselift Kit Demonstration

     ^ IIRC, the spring hat is sometimes lined with rubber or something compliant although it's clearly not in the pic above. In any case, they're not as 'rigidly' fixed as they could be, I think.

    Normally the hat just slides on to the shaft and while it butts up against the nut at the top, there's still radial clearance so it can move about. I don't know how significant this movement is - I don't know the clearance figures, but at extremes of storkes, this might possibly move. I'm not saying this is definitely the reason. It depends on the design of the spring top mount (or hat, as i seem to call it) which there are many.

    Actually, I see the pics in the OP that there's a helper spring and that the material for the hat might include something rubber-like ('cos otherwise they've added a big lump of Al there for no reason) so it seems possible that the spring can temporarily misalign.

    Either that or it's just the fact that helper springs twist/rotate during their stroke. Putting the cylinder against it wouldn't be good idea there also.


     
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