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    It's all in the pronunciation...

    A friend of mine recently commented that the difference between the words Porsche (pronounce Porsh-uh) and Porsche (pronounced Porsh) is the difference between those who own one and those who don't. Not surprisingly he is a 1970 911T owner and uses the former. What say ye, fellow Rennteamers?

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    It's Porsch-EH, if you want to be correct.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Porsche The "e" has to be pronounced surd/breathed.
    Best thing is to google for some German P-commercials and listen to the speaker

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    It's Porsch-EH, if you want to be correct.



    Porsche-EEEJJJJJ makes it sound more impressive

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    There is only one correct way to pronounce it (i.e. "Porsh-uh"). Even though many people say "Porsh", it's not because it's an equally valid alternative. It's because they just aren't aware of how it is correctly pronounced. Just remember "Porsche" is a person's name (not a word like "either" that can correctly be pronounced in 2 ways) so it only has one correct way of pronounciation.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Bpaw Shaah. (kidding)

    Seriously, It is very logical to conclude "Porsh" is crude.

    Here's why:

    Say you were at a party in Germany or the USA. You get introduced to Ferdinand. Someone says, "Permit me to introduce you to Dr Porsch_aah_."

    Do you say, "It's an honor to meet you Dr. Porsh." No.

    So..., thereafter..., how do you then go about pronouncing his name when referring to his cars?

    Just say "Porscha" and let the other guy squirm, adjust, and re-learn. _Know_ and rejoice that _you_ are correct.

    Case closed. Let the flames begin.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    easy_rider911 said:
    There is only one correct way to pronounce it (i.e. "Porsh-uh"). Even though many people say "Porsh", it's not because it's an equally valid alternative. It's because they just aren't aware of how it is correctly pronounced. Just remember "Porsche" is a person's name (not a word like "either" that can correctly be pronounced in 2 ways) so it only has one correct way of pronounciation.



    N'importe quoi ...

    It's the americans & the british who invented porsch-uh because they had no idea how to prononce it.


    In french, it' porsch. I think in german it's prononce that way too.


    Porsch-uh always made me laugh. It's like saying 9/11 instead of 911. It's not a date, but a number.

    Obviously it's easier to prononce 9/11 in english.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    It's "Porcheuh" in German. And they often call the car "the 11" ("der Elfer"). We're doing it wrong, amazon.

    When talking with non-car nuts, I say "Porch" in French, because "Porcheuh" sounds pedantic. But I think Porcheuh.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    amazon said: N'importe quoi ...

    It's the americans & the british who invented porsch-uh because they had no idea how to prononce it.


    In french, it' porsch. I think in german it's prononce that way too.


    Porsch-uh always made me laugh. It's like saying 9/11 instead of 911. It's not a date, but a number.

    Obviously it's easier to prononce 9/11 in english.



    Hate to break the bad news to you, but the joke and the laughing is on you....

    Germans pronounce the "e", just as bitte (please) is pronounced "bit-ah", Porsche is most CERTAINLY pronounced "porsh-ah", or "uh", or whatever combination of letters gets you there...

    Furthermore, it's us Yanks that most CERTAINLY contributed to the MIS-pronunciation, as our language does not recognize the "e" at the end of words, rendering it silent... As such, your average schmutz in the U.S. will holler "Hey, bud, nice Poursh!!" and then burp-up his Sonny's BBQ he just wolfed at lunch..

    4 years of high-school german from a native-born teacher finally comes to some use... Thanks Frau Chesser!!

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    I say nine-eleven, not nine-one-one, or nine hundred and eleven.

    But on the other hand, I say nine-nine-seven, not nine ninety seven.

    When I call my dealer, they pronounce it Porsh-ah. So I'll go with that.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    It's Porsch-EH, if you want to be correct.



    Rossi gets the prize and my vote. I was born and raised outside Gmund - this is the way I learned to pronounce it as a kid and I rode in the back of many old Porsch -ehs

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    So they're Canadian, eh?

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Oh yeah, while we're on the topic, here's another one. Gallardo. Gah-lahr-doh.

    Jeremy Clarkson says GUY-ar-doh. Is that a British thing? The Italian pronunciation is nowhere near that.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    69bossnine said:

    Hate to break the bad news to you, but the joke and the laughing is on you....

    Germans pronounce the "e", just as bitte (please) is pronounced "bit-ah", Porsche is most CERTAINLY pronounced "porsh-ah", or "uh", or whatever combination of letters gets you there...

    Furthermore, it's us Yanks that most CERTAINLY contributed to the MIS-pronunciation, as our language does not recognize the "e" at the end of words, rendering it silent... As such, your average schmutz in the U.S. will holler "Hey, bud, nice Poursh!!" and then burp-up his Sonny's BBQ he just wolfed at lunch..

    4 years of high-school german from a native-born teacher finally comes to some use... Thanks Frau Chesser!!






    At least, if that forum was french, I would have been right ...

    I have to say that frenches alwayz transform the prononciation of US/UK word.

    I always love to hear people talk about richard gere and prononce it richard jere.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    JoeRockhead said:
    Oh yeah, while we're on the topic, here's another one. Gallardo. Gah-lahr-doh.

    Jeremy Clarkson says GUY-ar-doh. Is that a British thing? The Italian pronunciation is nowhere near that.



    All Lamborghinis have Spanish names (bull names in fact). So JC is probably correct.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    its Porsche like they say in commercials

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    The thing about is might be this.

    Germans have an easier time with the correct Porsch-eh.

    'Mericans can't get the "eh" sound and substitute "ah."

    So here it's Porsh-ah

    There it's Porsh-eh

    Is that accurate?

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    When refering to what I drive, I just leave it as 'The car'. Everyone knows what I drive, so no need to draw attention to the fact! I feel such a spanner deliberately calling it a Porsche, no matter how I pronounce it!

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    wtsnet said:
    When refering to what I drive, I just leave it as 'The car'. Everyone knows what I drive, so no need to draw attention to the fact! I feel such a spanner deliberately calling it a Porsche, no matter how I pronounce it!



    In southern England you can call it a Porsche-uh, but up North you just sound like a twat doing so (for want of a better phrase!). I can't think of anyone (except my OPC) up here that uses the 'uh'.

    In France they say Pa-reeee for Paris. But we don't. And New-gaar for Nougat (up north we say nugget).

    Maybe I'm just common!

    ...Mad

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    JoeRockhead said:
    Oh yeah, while we're on the topic, here's another one. Gallardo. Gah-lahr-doh.

    Jeremy Clarkson says GUY-ar-doh. Is that a British thing? The Italian pronunciation is nowhere near that.



    Gallardo is a Spanish, not Italian, word. The "ll" has no English equivalent and the closest for an English speaker, though not the true pronunciation, is to sound it like a "y" as in Ga-yar-do. It's similar to Italian "gl", Portuguese "lh" or French "ll" as in "Guillaume" but not as is "famille" and, again, not exactly the same as any of those either.

    The Gallardo is an Italian car but, as we all know, most of the names Lamborghini uses for its cars are Spanish and pronounced as in Spanish. By the way, I am ssssoooo tired of hearing "Murciélago" pronounced with stress on "la" as in mur-cie-LA-go when it is with stress in the "e" as in mur-ci-E-la-go. The "i and the "e" are pronounced separately since Spanish is highly phonetic and letters don't change in pronunciation and all are pronounced separately.

    Finalmente, para quien no crea lo que he escrito en el párrafo superior, por favor, váyase a la escuela y aprenda idiomas extranjeros, correctamente y concienzudamente, antes de dar una opinión incorrecta y lucir como un completo ignorante. Just my simple advise!

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    The Groom said:
    Quote:
    JoeRockhead said:
    Oh yeah, while we're on the topic, here's another one. Gallardo. Gah-lahr-doh.

    Jeremy Clarkson says GUY-ar-doh. Is that a British thing? The Italian pronunciation is nowhere near that.



    All Lamborghinis have Spanish names (bull names in fact). So JC is probably correct.



    You are quite correct! The English "y" is not quite like the Spanish "ll" but is the closest sound you can compare it to. JC is correct. Just remember that the stress is on the second syllable so it should be said ga-YAR-do and all vowels are short vowels. Never pronounce the "o" as in hotel, ever!

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    JoeRockhead said:
    Quote:

    Finalmente, para quien no crea lo que he escrito en el párrafo superior, por favor, váyase a la escuela y aprenda idiomas extranjeros, correctamente y concienzudamente, antes de dar una opinión incorrecta y lucir como un completo ignorante. Just my simple advise!



    I promise I'll never ask a question about a foreign language again until I go to so school to become completely fluent in it, lest I look ignorant.



    I wasn't referring to asking questions, but to expressing opinions which, as far as I know, was not what you were doing on the post I quoted and, therefore, did not apply to you in this case. Asking questions is one way in which we learn, of course! I was merely talking about fellows who express opinions without knowing the language well enough to express them.

    I did quote you but - and in this I should have made myself clearer - it was to clarify the pronunciation of "Gallardo", which I did, of course, at the very beginning and was your question, I believe, and not to express or imply that you in particular should engage in the learning of a foreign tongue in order to be an "erudito", as we say in Castilian. The second part of my post was not intended for you specifically. I hope this clears any misunderstandings.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    cibergypsy said:
    Finalmente, para quien no crea lo que he escrito en el párrafo superior, por favor, váyase a la escuela y aprenda idiomas extranjeros, correctamente y concienzudamente, antes de dar una opinión incorrecta y lucir como un completo ignorante. Just my simple advise!



    I completely agree with you on the PorschE and GaYardo. And even, I understood the spanish part! Wow, school must have been not copmpletely useless!
    -Joost-

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    madadd said:
    In France they say Pa-reeee for Paris.



    The Paris analogy doesn't work here IMHO.

    The proper name 'Paris' exists in both English and French i.e. effectively there are 2 words. One word in French is pronounced 'Par-eee" while the other word in English is pronounced 'Par-iss'. Therefore IMHO it is not the case that the English are mispronouncing a French word. They are correctly pronouncing what has become an English word (that is itself derived from a French word).

    Why is this correct? Well, here's an example that IMHO proves it. To pick another place name example, in Italian, it's 'Roma'. In English, we have our own word 'Rome' which is derived from the Italian word. Since the spelling is actually different, it is easier to see that the English are not mispronouncing an Italian word. They are correctly pronouncing an English word.

    And it's not just the English that create their own word in their own language for the proper name of a city in another country. The Italian name for London is Londra i.e. there are 2 words. An even more obvious example is Firenze (in Italian) which is known as Florence (in English).

    Now coming back to Porsche, it is not the case that a separate word exists in English (pronounced 'Poursh'). There is only one word in German (pronounced Porsh-uh). That's why IMHO the Paris analogy you gave doesn't work here.

    If people in the north of England would feel like twats if they said Porsch-uh, it's not because Porsh is equally valid, it's due to a cultural reluctance i.e. for other reasons they would feel silly. This feeling doesn't exist here in London IMHO. I know I am stoking the flames of the North/South debate here but it comes down to whether pronouncing things a certain way is respected per se or seen as being too full of oneself.

    BTW, for those outside the UK who are unfamiliar with this term, a 'twat' is a word which literally means a woman's genital area but obviously 'feeling like a twat' just means feeling like an idiiot.

    Interesting thread. Never thought it would go on and on this long. Just goes to show just how important language is.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Here in arabia, its pronounced "Bor-sheh" :P

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    But that's only because the letter P doesn't exist in Arabic so the letter B is used for both P and B. So, for example, you drink Bebsi whereas we drink Pepsi

    BTW, the letter P does exist in Persian and Urdu...

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    madadd said:
    Quote:
    wtsnet said:
    When refering to what I drive, I just leave it as 'The car'. Everyone knows what I drive, so no need to draw attention to the fact! I feel such a spanner deliberately calling it a Porsche, no matter how I pronounce it!



    In southern England you can call it a Porsche-uh, but up North you just sound like a twat doing so (for want of a better phrase!). I can't think of anyone (except my OPC) up here that uses the 'uh'.

    In France they say Pa-reeee for Paris. But we don't. And New-gaar for Nougat (up north we say nugget).

    Maybe I'm just common!

    ...Mad



    Just be grateful Porsches aren't built in Wales in a town called Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyll-llanysilliogogogoch

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    easy_rider911 said:
    But that's only because the letter P doesn't exist in Arabic so the letter B is used for both P and B. So, for example, you drink Bebsi whereas we drink Pepsi

    BTW, the letter P does exist in Persian and Urdu...



    And another thing, WHY are Arabic speakers unable (or are they just unwilling) to pronounce the P sound just because the letter P doesn't exist in Arabic. That has never made sense to me. I guess the only explanation must be again that the Arabic speakers have effectively created their own word substituting the letter B for the letter P.

    In English, we don't have a letter like KH (in Arabic, pronounced 'kheh') but we are still perfectly happy to pronounce it the way it is pronounced in Arabic.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Easy, people lose the ability to identify and use phonems they don't hear when they're kids. That explains why most East Asian people have a hard time with "L"s and "R"s... Or the French with "TH"s.

    When speaking a foreign language, most people try to approximate unknown phonems through a combination of phonems they know (cue engrish jokes again).

    I'm not sure we do such a great job with the Arabic "KH". We do have some exposure through immigrants (also some European languages have similar phonems), but are we doing it perfectly? I don't know.

    Re: It's all in the pronunciation...

    Quote:
    easy_rider911 said:
    Quote:
    easy_rider911 said:
    But that's only because the letter P doesn't exist in Arabic so the letter B is used for both P and B. So, for example, you drink Bebsi whereas we drink Pepsi

    BTW, the letter P does exist in Persian and Urdu...



    And another thing, WHY are Arabic speakers unable (or are they just unwilling) to pronounce the P sound just because the letter P doesn't exist in Arabic. That has never made sense to me. I guess the only explanation must be again that the Arabic speakers have effectively created their own word substituting the letter B for the letter P.

    In English, we don't have a letter like KH (in Arabic, pronounced 'kheh') but we are still perfectly happy to pronounce it the way it is pronounced in Arabic.




    becasue the majority of them is arrogant.

    Besides..how ugly does it sound B-orsche


    ahaha omygod

     
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