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    Maserati Quattroporte

    Hi,
    I am thinking of including the Maserati Quattroporte into my garage alongside my Carrera S w/X51(arriving Jan'06) and '05 Cayenne whilst waiting for the Panamera to arrive in 2009. This car is for business mostly but it should have have some performance attributes. I read with interest in the recent EVO November issue with its test against the Alpina B5, Cadillac and reference to the M5 and was awed by its prowess despite a relative shortfall of 100hp.
    Does anyone on this board have much experience and opinions with regards to the QP?
    Thanks in advance.
    Cheers


    From the NYT:

    http://www.nytimes.com/pages/automobiles/index.html

    Maserati Quattroporte: Ciao, Bella: An Italian Opera in Four Doors
    By TED WEST
    Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

    THEY took back my Maserati today. No, worse. They made me drive it to Maserati North America in New Jersey and surrender it. That wasn't easy.

    In no more time than it takes to floss a healthy adult bear, my Maserati and I had become a couple. We shared matters of temperament and taste. We were intrigued by each other's personality, spontaneity, impetuousness - in computer-dating terms, we had ample cause to form a relationship.

    I have a weakness for things Italian, and my Maserati Quattroporte - all right, it was a test car in my possession for just a week - was so Italian, it communicated with its hands.

    In these homogenous automotive times, the ethnic motorcar has become seriously blurred. For German precision and reliability, we buy Japanese; for Japanese thrift at the cost of style, we buy from Detroit; and for Detroit pizazz and over-the-top performance, we go to the Germans.

    Yet cars from Italy somehow remain defiantly Italian, in all their Verdian grandiosity. My Quattroporte (it means four doors) was proof.

    Why "my" Maserati?

    When we met, it looked me straight in the eye and, in a rich Bolognese accent, said: "My friend, if we are to get along, you must first learn some things about me. And if you do, I will make you feel stupendo!"

    I'd been through this vetting process before. I remember sitting at a table in Perugia long ago trying to coil tagliatelle around my fork - no loose strands - without resorting to the silly soup spoon supplied for foreigners. The first time I succeeded, ah, signore, bravo!

    How does the tagliatelle test apply to a Maserati Quattroporte?

    Well, consider my experience in learning to use the six-speed DuoSelect transmission. Reflecting Formula One racing-car technology (sort of), it employs nothing so mundane as a shift lever or clutch pedal. Instead, two paddles are situated behind the steering wheel, one on each side. Pull the right paddle and you shift up a gear; pull the left paddle and you shift down. Leave them alone and DuoSelect shifts automatically, like your son's ratty Oldsmobile.

    The good news: getting used to these paddles is intuitive. But remember I said that the Quattroporte has personality, to wit: operated in full automatic, DuoSelect will effortlessly guide you through the indignities of rush-hour stop and go. But dare to use the shift paddles and presto, you are deep in the complexities of la bella Italia.

    What does that mean? Here is what it does not mean: If DuoSelect were German, operating a paddle would initiate 200,000 earnest binary calculations, after which the transmission would give you a patronizing nod and do what it was planning to do anyway. But if you flip the paddle on the Maser, it does just what you ask. So ask carefully.

    On my first few tries, DuoSelect shifted like a bag of broken glass. Upshifting and downshifting to keep pace with the roller-derby of traffic outside the windshield, I got an assortment of surging, bucking shifts - tuh-thunk, tuh-thunk. This was upsetting, because the Quattroporte has the heart of a lion. Its 4.2-liter V-8 makes 395 horsepower and 326 pound-feet of torque, and the car rages to 60 miles an hour in 5.1 seconds. The government reckons fuel economy at a profligate 16 m.p.g. on the highway and 11 in town, accounting for a gas-guzzler tax of $3,700. And with the front engine set far back in the chassis and the transmission on the rear axle, the car has excellent weight distribution: 48 percent in front and 52 in the rear. The Quattroporte never met a curve it wouldn't romance.

    Surely, then, such Italianate elegance should shift elegantly, too. It would be easy to say, naw, the thing's no good. Yet having long ago passed the tagliatelle test - no loose strands! - I knew that in matters Italian, some technique may be required. And the Maserati people had told me I would find some "tricks" driving this car, which sounded gratuitous at the time.

    But after a day or two of tuh-thunk, tuh-thunk, I knew that the DuoSelect was a bit sluggish about matching engine speed with wheel speed as it shifted, accounting for the bucking and surging. I experimented by giving the throttle a crisp blip while downshifting, as you would with a manual gearbox.

    Hey, smooth!

    I even tried blipping the throttle while upshifting, which is illogical on its face. The engine shouldn't need to speed up when meeting a higher gear. But, hey, this is an Italian car. Sure enough, the shift was glass-smooth, and quick, too.

    I continued to find finer and finer throttle-blipping subtleties at various engine speeds, and the Maserati came alive - athletic, agile, ready to dance on the head of a pin. All it asked of me was some touch and a little technique. Shifting became like driving the pedals of a pipe organ. I was playing the DuoSelect as if it were Puccini.

    As promised, I felt wonderful. My Maserati wasn't a lovely diva with halitosis, but a lady of grace and wit - and she found me fascinating!

    The Quattroporte's comforts were never in doubt. Designed for captains of industry who may also play polo, such a car decrees that rich is good but handsome is better. Its interior is straightforward, exquisite and blessedly simple. The combined audio and navigation system affirms that Maserati's goal is not a 500-page driver's manual but undistracted driving pleasure. You set the climate control with one or two jabs - revolutionary by the computer-blighted standards of today's luxury cars. And here is an Italian air-conditioner that overcomes the ugliest meltdowns of a New York summer.

    Placed between the large, handsome, blue speedometer and tachometer, an information display tabulates gas mileage, average speed, fuel range and such. Steering-wheel controls regulate the stereo and the phone. (If you require a steering-wheel button that fluffs the pillows in your master bedroom or lowers the spinnaker on your sloop, Cadillac is working on it.)

    The steering column tilts and telescopes to your needs, and the girth and grip of the wheel remind you that driving can feel good. Where the gearshift used to be, a tiny T handle grants access to reverse gear.

    The seats in my Maserati (I'm not giving up without a fight) were black leather with gray piping. And because this is the kind of car meant for the kind of people who are meant for this kind of car (if you see my point), all four seats are power adjustable.

    This is important. If your Quattroporte is to be chauffeur-driven, while you sit in the loges running the world, the rear seats are downright baronial. Call it the boardroom and be done with it. After adjusting your own seat (to arrive slightly higher than your lawyer's, to your left), you may then push what I call the ejection button. This wizard device slides the right-front seat forward, affording il patrone - you - the almost limitless legroom you so richly deserve. The front seats are for salaried staff anyway. Let them bump their knees.

    For privacy, there is an electric deep-dark rear-window shade. Your lawyer will think that's so cool.

    But this car is about more than sumptuousness: learning to use its DuoSelect is central to grasping its personality. This is above all a driver's car, one with which you must come to an "accommodation."

    It put me in mind of a time long ago when I was hitchhiking in the Italian Alps, a fool's errand if ever there was one. I'd waited hours for a ride before, finally, a sleek Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint coupe stopped. The driver and his teenage son had the front seats, so I rolled up in a ball in the back - but after the long wait, I wasn't complaining. The driver was a classic northern Italian: tanned, with gray sidewalls, wearing flawless tailored tweed. Audrey Hepburn would've looked him over, twice.

    He accelerated down the veering and swooping Alpine two-lane at full throttle, tires shrieking through every curve. We were flying. But it wasn't the driver's speed that intrigued me - it was his skilled, utter calm. The definitive Italian gentleman driver, he knew what he was doing every millimeter of the way.

    My point? Today, he would drive a Quattroporte DuoSelect - fast and flawlessly, without a tuh-thunk in a decade.

    Great Italian cars aren't for everyone, and not simply because this one costs $106,850. Financials aside, the Quattroporte is out of reach to many on philosophical grounds. A performance car that takes your measure, it expects skills possessed by people who care passionately about driving, and it rewards these skills with more involvement, more pure automotive character, than anything this side of a racecar.

    But what of its idiosyncrasies, you ask. What of them? The ticks and oddities of great Italian cars endear them to their drivers. DuoSelect's manual mode not only gives you better control over engine speed and wheel speed than fully automatic shifting, you're also invited to practice a satisfying new technique.

    The Quattroporte competes against six-figure megasedans like the Mercedes-Benz S600 and BMW 760Li. Maserati is selling some 1,000 of the cars annually in the United States, with another 1,000 finding buyers elsewhere in the world.

    Two new versions of the car arrive for 2006, a more aggressive Sport GT and a more cushy Executive GT.

    The Quattroporte beckons to those stalwart few who believe a car should have a soul. Such drivers love a car whose individuality is unmistakable. After all, the greatest human personalities are shot through with idiosyncrasies. Why not a great performance car?

    INSIDE TRACK: Now that's Italian!

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    one article can have so much influence on purchasing power.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Look at its weight distribution. Maserati gives you as close as you are going to get in a 4 door to 997 weight
    bias and feel.

    The Maserati also has the Ferrari built V8, but with longer service intervals and a longer warranty.

    The car seems friendlier and less ridiculously over serious
    compared to a German uber sedan. It may have fewer electrical gremlins also.

    Get one you will be happy. Its both fast and fun, a combination the Germans seem to have forgotten.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Well i really like the Quattroporte, but i would wait for the new s8 powered by the Lambo v10 detuned to 450bhp. The a8 is known has having the sportier handling of all high class limousines and you won't be deceived by the strict but classy&functionnal interior.0/62 in 5.1sec 4wd and 6000 euros less expensive.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    I LOVE the QP....saw a white one last week....bella!

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Yes, I was planning to configure my QP in white with cuoio interior, but am undecided between the Sport or Executive version.
    Would appreciate opinions on choices. Thanks,

    29.07.2005 Building on the huge international success of the Maserati Quattroporte, two new versions will appear at the Frankfurt IAA in September: the Quattroporte Executive GT and the Quattroporte Sport GT
    ....
    Quattroporte EXECUTIVE GT
    Distinguished by a blend of elegant eye-catching colours and refined wood veneer finishes for the interior, the Executive GT includes the following accessories: Chrome mesh grille, side chrome grille, external identification plate, 9-spoke 19" ball-polished wheel rims, wood and leather steering wheel, roof section in Alcantara and a series of features dedicated to providing maximum comfort levels for passengers (among them comfort pack for the rear seats and stowable rear table in wood or titanium). Further personalisation options are available.

    Quattroporte SPORT GT
    The aggressive look is captured in the carbon fibre interior, 20" wheel rims with new design, external identification plate, sporty steering wheel and handbrake grip, aluminium pedal covers. Among the dynamic features, the latest gearbox software for a 35% faster shifting, newly designed exhaust system delivering an even more sporty sound and specific Skyhook software for electronic suspensions and shock absorbers.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    I've seen a few on the road, they do like quite nice. The only reason why a person (imo) would choose one of those instead of say... an A8 W12, 760, S600 or M5 or something in that range would simply be the style factor. The fact of the matter is that it is a Maserati- not a bmw that everyone is expected to get at the least. Moreover- one can personalize the hell out of it. I don't like the rear lights.... the hp is fine, however... w/ what everyone is doing these days w/ the horsepower wars- that car should have about 450ish... the new Mercedes S500 is 388hp and gets to 60 in 5.5secs. But yeah, the Maserati is nice to look at.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Just got my QP after more than 1 year of waiting. I went with gigio plladio ext, ivory interior, 19" wheels and executive version. It is a beauty. I felt that the sport version the ride was too harsh where the executive version you can always put on a sport mode which I do when I out of the city.

    Recently look at M5, the interior is like a 3 star motel where the QP is the Ritz! Go for it! You won't be disappointed.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    To the respondants , Thanks a million.
    We'll be planning to visit the dealer tomorrow for a test drive and place a confirmation deposit since they have a few cars available on hand and it could be delivered in less than 10 days (That's light years faster than the 997) after Registration and PDI.
    My family already have our sights on the Standard Executive model with Black with Bordeaux/black and Titanium trim.
    Cheers


    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    I just saw a rerun of TopGear in which they tested the Quattroporte in Italy on the "Targa Florio" roads.

    Essentially they think it's a car with two different characters. When driven hard on backcountry roads, it's brilliant and sporty. However, as a town car, they didn't like it too much (strange gearbox setup constantly switching gears for this purpose).

    I'm sure you can download this episode somewhere on the net.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    That's a beautiful interior.

    I think I'd heard they'd made some improvements to the gearbox software too.

    any why is it only the Italiens can get away with calling a car 'Four Doors'?

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Rich C (UK) said:
    any why is it only the Italiens can get away with calling a car 'Four Doors'?



    How many of the wolrd's languages would allow "four doors" sound as good as "Q U A T T R O P O R T E"

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    fritz said:
    Quote:
    Rich C (UK) said:
    any why is it only the Italiens can get away with calling a car 'Four Doors'?



    How many of the wolrd's languages would allow "four doors" sound as good as "Q U A T T R O P O R T E"



    Yeah,

    Maybe that's the reason Porsche decided not to call the Panamera the VIERTUERIG.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Matt C said:
    I just saw a rerun of TopGear in which they tested the Quattroporte in Italy on the "Targa Florio" roads.

    Essentially they think it's a car with two different characters. When driven hard on backcountry roads, it's brilliant and sporty. However, as a town car, they didn't like it too much (strange gearbox setup constantly switching gears for this purpose).

    I'm sure you can download this episode somewhere on the net.



    I think this video is available on the Top Gear Web site (go to the video section).

    However, James May (the reporter) said recently in the Top Gear Magazine that he would rather have a QP over a CLS 55 AMG and for the "10 favorite cars of the Top Gear magazine" issue the QP was his personal choice.
    Anyway, I would't rely too much on the opinions of the Top Gear episodes, since they keep saying one thing and its opposite. I would rather trust the comparaison beetween the QP, Cadillac and a bimmer in a recent EVO issue written by Richard Meaden.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Al Pettee said:
    Quote:
    fritz said:
    Quote:
    Rich C (UK) said:
    any why is it only the Italiens can get away with calling a car 'Four Doors'?



    How many of the wolrd's languages would allow "four doors" sound as good as "Q U A T T R O P O R T E"



    Yeah,

    Maybe that's the reason Porsche decided not to call the Panamera the VIERTUERIG.


    How insightful....very funny

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Winding Road Issue#2

    Maserati Quattroporte by Brooks Holden

    On occasion you've undoubtedly taken a test drive and thought, "Even I could do a better job designing this car than these guys." In fact, you've probably wondered how some firms with well-established reputations could release such ill-conceived products and features: the Pontiac Aztek, BMW I-drive, the Mercedes SLK suspension, the Porsche 996.0 steering, etc., etc. Without much thought, you could have easily foreseen disaster and sent the professionals in a wiser direction. I must confess, I've had these thoughts repeatedly myself, with almost every car I've driven. Sure, sometimes the things I'd change are pretty small, but the thought is there.

    The Maserati Quattroporte presents an interesting challenge to this line of thinking. Not because it is perfect - it isn't - but because the Quattroporte is in many ways the big sedan you'd spec on paper after the guys in Stuttgart or Maranello got wise and called you up from your living room couch to head their design team. After meeting the team, you'd explain that this time the team would build a big sedan that drivers could love. You'd say that you did not want a huge Camry with lots of leather, wood, NASA-style electronics, and the biggest motor in the shop. You'd say that you did want to work from the ground up to design with the driver in mind, and then indulge the passengers not through isolation, but by inspiration. You'd plan to go on, but by this time the applause from the team would be deafening, so you'd simply smile and sit down.

    The next day, of course, real work would begin. You'd start with a normally aspirated V-8 for responsiveness, specifying ample torque and a willingness to rev. Check. You'd insist on a characterful engine with a lovely sound across the rpm range, so you'd have it designed by Ferrari. Check. You'd want really balanced handling, so you'd mount the engine behind the front suspension for better weight distribution. Check. Along those same lines, you'd request a rear wheel drive platform with a transaxle. Check. And you'd have shock absorber damping rates adjust to the driver's style and road conditions. Check. You'd eschew the traditional but unsporting big-sedan slushbox for a paddle-shifted sequential manual gearbox. Check. While this is in keeping with the F1 heritage of the drivetrain, you (oh, brilliant one) would also make the engineers stay late at night refining the auto-shift programming of the transmission for those in-town occasions where the driver isn't pushing it. Check. To keep weight within reason, you'd specify an aluminum and steel chassis. Check. To ensure ample front and rear room, you'd ask for a long wheelbase. Check. And, then, for your final masterstroke, you'd insist that Pininfarina do the exterior and interior design work in its usual sensuous style. Check. Not bad for a novice. Actually, not bad for anyone. You've just conceived of a completely different kind of large sedan, at least when compared with those built by most of today's leaders - Mercedes (S500), Audi (A8L), Jaguar (XJ8 L), and Lexus (LS 430). The notion of isolation from the road as a critical goal lurks somewhere deep in the design brief for their big sedans. Sure, some will build you a sporty version (S55, Super V8) of their big cars, but the isolationist DNA seeps through. BMW alone among the established brands has a hard time with the isolationist philosophy, and it shows in the 7 series. But BMW isn't committed to a truly sporting version of the 7. So, congratulations! Your design is unique. But is your design truly good or simply the misbegotten dreaming of an amateur? Well, folks, I'm here to say that the Maserati is the real deal. Once you've driven the Quattroporte, you realize that it gives you what a driver really wants in a big sedan.

    Let's start out by assuming that you've driven the Quattroporte for a few weeks. This is important, because the Duoselect paddle-shifted transmission requires some experience before it feels seamless and natural. Imagine that you'd driven an automatic for 10 years and then, for the first time, you drove a six-speed manual for a day. Do you think the six-speed would feel natural? Do you think you'd be the picture of grace at the controls? The paddle-shifted manual in the Maser isn't quite that big a jump, but it is different, and it takes some time to incorporate it into your intuition. It is possible that much of the criticism of F1-style transmissions is due to this lack of intuitive familiarity on the part of testers.

    Once the distraction of using the transmission is gone, you can get on with the Quattroporte experience. The first thing you notice is the sound of the engine. You can hear it clearly, which is a huge advantage, and it sounds fabulous. Deep-throated induction noise is mixed with refined valve train whir in a way that makes the Maser feel much more willing than other cars in its class. This sensation is backed up by 333 lb.-ft. of torque that the 4.3 liter V-8 dishes out.

    Still, that torque level is unexceptional in this class. The key is that the Quattroporte doesn't have an automatic with a torque converter, so throttle response seems vastly superior to the competition. The Maserati steering is also excellent. You can feel what the front tires are doing and the weighting of the wheel is very nice-not too light and certainly not too heavy. After many miles, I felt that the steering nicely complemented the chassis setup by giving the sense that you were flinging, rather than muscling, the car around. As you might expect, given its 49/51 front/rear weight distribution, the Quattroporte has a pretty neutral handling balance. In medium-speed turns, you can feel them. The first thing you notice is the sound of the engine. rear tires bite in a most reassuring way. This balance, together with the flat cornering offered by beefy anti-roll bars and Skyhook adaptive damping, encourages tossing the car into corners. Such a description of the chassis' balance could, of course, apply equally well to the 745Li. Yet the two cars feel entirely different. The BMW, with active anti-roll, seems to hammer the road flat. It feels supremely confident, but always a step removed from what is happening below. The Maserati moves around on its feet much more obviously, like a dancer.

    The driver has to respond a bit more to what the chassis is doing, but by the same token, the Maserati ensures that the driver is more involved. The Quattroporte has some of the character of the 911, wherein the chassis is balanced and capable, but also offers up some slightly surprising motions to keep things interesting. In the real world, this is what you want. Your head may tell you that you want the BMW, but your heart will prefer the Maserati. Upon further review, say of skid pad numbers close to .9g and 0-60 times around five seconds, your head may go for the Maser too. As fun as the Quattroporte is, Maserati can't repeal the laws of physics. This is particularly obvious in the way the long wheelbase affects handling. While the Quattroporte is balanced and involving, it doesn't have the turn-in or eagerness to rotate that shorter wheelbase sports cars do. If going fast and enjoying the process were the only things that mattered, then you'd probably be looking at a different class of car entirely, most particularly the M5 or the Carrera S. So a car like the Quattroporte also has to deliver on the luxury front. Having spent ample time in the S-class Mercedes, the 745Li, the XJ8 L, and the A8L, I'd say the Quattroporte has them covered hands down in the luxury department. You can get analytical about this, but a much more important criterion in my mind is the memorability factor. I promise that the guests in your Quattroporte will remember the experience. I doubt the passengers in the other four worthy contenders would give their time there a second thought. The advantage of the Quattroporte starts the minute you walk up to the car. You know this car isn't German or Japanese. It combines graceful lines with a sense of gravity.

    This positive impression continues when you get into the back seat. The materials, the design, and the details are just massively more interesting than those commonly used in big luxury sedans. The color selections for leather, wood, and carpeting can actually be beautiful in the Quattroporte. In the other cars, the selections seem much more driven by the accounting department. This sense of occasion extends to the seating, too, which is more comfortable than in the other cars. The Maserati gives you ample legroom and headroom, while cosseting you in ergonomically superior chairs, front and back. With optional tray tables, and small design touches like the logo on the rear of the console, the back seat is designed as a special place in which to ride. The Maserati gives you ample legroom and headroom, while cosseting you in ergonomically superior chairs, front and back. Rather than something handed to a junior engineer while the experienced designers attended to more important matters.

    Your passengers will find the ride quality perfectly acceptable, and if the Duoselect transmission in auto mode isn't as smooth as the autobox they're used to in the LS430, it isn't really a problem. They probably won't notice as they marvel at the sights and sounds of a real car. When reminded that Maserati is Italian and owned by Ferrari, they'll start reminiscing about that last trip to Tuscany and how the Italian sensibility makes life more enjoyable. You'll just smile knowingly.

    There is a price to pay for all this excellence. At a list price of $95,500, the Quattroporte is priced $10,000-$25,000 higher than its big sedan competition. Beyond the differences in driving experience, the cheaper competitors don't provide the performance that the Maserati offers, generally delivering 0-60 times about one second slower that the Quattroporte (the exception being the Jaguar Super V8). For Quattroporte-level performance (or a bit more), you have to step up to the supercharged or 12-cylinder variants of each company's flagship sedan. In general, this will set you back $20,000 more than the Quattroporte. And that $20k won't buy you the exclusivity of the Maserati.

    So, we're back to where we started. The Quattroporte is unique among big sedans, in a good way. It succeeds more than other big sedans at being a driver's car, yet it has a different and in many ways superior take on luxury too. Pretty good for your first project as a chief engineer. Your head may tell you that you want the BMW, but your heart will prefer the Maserati.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    I think the Sport GT looks fantastic, here are some pics from Frankfurt:

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Rear

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    The bling-bling Exectutive GT should be a big hit in the US

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Lots of shiny stuff

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    You can find all the Maserati pictures here:
    2005 Frankfurt Auto Show

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    I think the whole car looks simply great, it's such a beauty, no matter which line you choose.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    One more, the Sport GT in black:

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    I think the whole car looks simply great, it's such a beauty, no matter which line you choose.



    So do I, the Quattroporte is by far the best looking 4-door sedan on the market. But my choice would be the Sport.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    temm said:
    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    I think the whole car looks simply great, it's such a beauty, no matter which line you choose.



    So do I, the Quattroporte is by far the best looking 4-door sedan on the market. But my choice would be the Sport.


    Sport comes with CF inside, right? Is it possible to get the Sport version with a different interior than the standard CF? Just curious.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    temm said:
    One more, the Sport GT in black:



    This exterior would be my favourite and choice.

    Manu thanks for the positive comments and moral support

    I will be opting for the Bi-color Bordeux(red/black) interior

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    Sport comes with CF inside, right? Is it possible to get the Sport version with a different interior than the standard CF? Just curious.



    Yes, I believe so.
    The CF is meant only for the Sport GT version but one can always opt either of the three different wood options: rosewood, mahogany and burl walnut. All wood crafted and finish like a glorious Stradivarius Violin....the pride of italian craftsmanship.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Avantgarde said:
    Quote:
    Rossi said:
    Sport comes with CF inside, right? Is it possible to get the Sport version with a different interior than the standard CF? Just curious.



    Yes, I believe so.
    The CF is meant only for the Sport GT version but one can always opt either of the three different wood options: rosewood, mahogany and burl walnut. All wood crafted and finish like a glorious Stradivarius Violin....the pride of italian craftsmanship.



    Very classy and elegant.

    I would go with the black exterior, bordeaux bicolor interior, but with wood instead of CF, especially the mahogany.

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Some interesting info from C&D
    "The starting point for the modern GranSport is the Coupé Cambiocorsa, which appeared in its current form, with a 4.2-liter V-8 engine and a transaxle incorporating a paddle-shift automated six-speed manual transmission, in 2002. The engine, which is related to the 4.3-liter V-8 in the upcoming Ferrari F430, is "blueprinted"-built with selected components to finer tolerances than the standard Maserati-and has a different exhaust system and inlet manifolds. The result is an 11-hp increase, to 396, although with rather different power and torque curves than the 394-hp version of the same engine in the Maserati Quattroporte sedan. And taking a cue from Ferrari, the exhaust system has a pneumatic valve to reduce back pressure and make a gloriously rich sound when the "sport" button is pressed."
    http://www.caranddriver.com/article.asp?section_id=19&article_id=8783&page_number=1

    Attached: F430 motor

    Re: Maserati Quattroporte

    Quote:
    Al Pettee said:
    Quote:
    fritz said:
    Quote:
    Rich C (UK) said:
    any why is it only the Italiens can get away with calling a car 'Four Doors'?



    How many of the wolrd's languages would allow "four doors" sound as good as "Q U A T T R O P O R T E"



    Yeah,

    Maybe that's the reason Porsche decided not to call the Panamera the VIERTUERIG.


    ...imagine if Porsche's answer to the Ferrari "Enzo" was the "Ferdinand"

     
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