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    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    No matter how good - I configured a coupe for 210k CHF and a convertible for 241 CHF which is insanity for a 4S.....

    I can get a Mk1 Turbo S for 100k less....


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    BjoernB:

    No matter how good - I configured a coupe for 210k CHF and a convertible for 241 CHF which is insanity for a 4S.....

    I can get a Mk1 Turbo S for 100k less....

    +1


    --

    2017 991.2 Carrera 4 GTS | GT Silver Metallic - The GT3 Killah!
    2013 Audi S3 | Glacier White


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Gauss:

    How come no one has yet commented on the sportdesign package. The rear bumper looks hideous:

    Screenshot 2019-01-12 at 22.03.19.png

    I think we have and I agree... Smiley Maybe it looks better in different colors.


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    BjoernB:

    No matter how good - I configured a coupe for 210k CHF and a convertible for 241 CHF which is insanity for a 4S.....

    I can get a Mk1 Turbo S for 100k less....

    Yep...the prices are insane indeed. Smiley

    Seems that VW Group wants to "recuperate" what they lost with the VW/Audi scandal... Smiley Smiley New Huracan Evo has a 17k EUR higher base price (OK, dynamic steering and RWS are standard but still...).


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Maybe we don’t want to pay for a mistake we did not make. If I were them I might even assume that existing customers are offended for having done business with them and need trust restored. My dad is furious with them and calls them criminals and worse. Not certain I feel that strongly but it is amazing the VW does not take this into account. 


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Leawood911:

     My dad is furious with them and calls them criminals and worse. Not certain I feel that strongly but it is amazing the VW does not take this into account. 

    I have a good friend who is a major supplier for the VW group . He said VW are the worst people to deal with . Absolutely horrible how they treat him and the company he represents . He feels depressed each time he sees them, gets treated badly  by emails they send him  etc... and they squeeze every cents out of them . He deals also with Audi who he says, on the other hand ,  are  very nice . 


    --

     964 Carrera 4 --  997.2 C2S , -20mm -- 991.2 GT3 RS 


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Is Chalk a metallic color, or flat?  Anyone have Chalk on their car? Any real time pics?  Thanks...


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    It's a flat colour.


    --

    2018 White 911 GT3


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    The more I see pictures of the 992, the more I think the only good color will be black!


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Thanks Gauss.  I think Porsche could use a light metallic grey, but they probably think silver is sufficient.


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    964C2:

    The more I see pictures of the 992, the more I think the only good color will be black!

    I agree. Need to hide the lines.Smiley


    --

    Stress is man made.


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Porsche 992 GT3 concept photoshop...

    1547590282240image.jpeg

    Smiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Another interpretation of a Porsche 992 GT3 concept...

    1547590718053image.jpeg

    Smiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Highly flawed photoshop of the new 992 GT3.  First, where is the recess for the license plate?  Second, the car will have a rear diffuser that is not even remotely imagined in the photograph.


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    and it will most probably feature a swan neck wing. 


    --

    2018 White 911 GT3


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Gauss:

    It's a flat colour.

    Just to be clear.... "flat" means "without gloss".  I think what the question was intended to be was whether Chalk is metallic or enamel-type paint... and the answer is that is is an enamel paint, which is glossy.  Not flat.   Clear?  Smiley


    --

    2017 Range Rover Sport S/C,  2009 Porsche 911S


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    ...or "solid" in the UK.


    --

    991 Carrera Black Edition, XC90 Black\Black - 2 kids, 1 dog


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    4trac:
    Gauss:

    It's a flat colour.

    Just to be clear.... "flat" means "without gloss".  I think what the question was intended to be was whether Chalk is metallic or enamel-type paint... and the answer is that is is an enamel paint, which is glossy.  Not flat.   Clear?  Smiley

    Thanks wink


    --

    2018 White 911 GT3


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Thanks from me also.  I am slightly interested in the color, as something different from the silver, white or dark grays.  I like the 992 enough to be considering it as my next car. Years back I had a dove grey 356 C cabriolet which I loved.


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Today's issue of Autocar in the UK.

    Autocar cover Jan 19.jpg

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Did you expect them to say anything else?  Its as surprising as the "they've fixed everything wrong with the 992" articles that will show up for the 994.


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Every new generation of the 911 is quicker, handles and stops better than what it replaces. They always cost more but they seem to always deliver owner satisfaction, even if you are a Kiwi named Murray with your second  Lemon 911. His 991.2 has really turned into gremlin laden disaster. Hopefully his 992, if he goes the lemon law route, will be a stalwart glitch free experience.

     

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    Can someone post the article?


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyvSxCOcMaM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjrarcM7HoY

     


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/porsche-911-carrera-s-2019-review-first-drive-track


    --

    2016 Cayman GT4 - 1992 964 Carrera 2 - 2016 Macan S Diesel - 2018 Mini JCW


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/porsche/911/first-drives/porsche-911-carrera-4s-2019-review


    --

    2016 Cayman GT4 - 1992 964 Carrera 2 - 2016 Macan S Diesel - 2018 Mini JCW


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    "New Porsche 911 (992) review: modern masterpiece" (Car magazine)

    ► First drive of Porsche’s eighth-generation 911
    ► Tech-heavy yet retro, faster yet more refined 
    ► Still the benchmark sports car? 

    Handling: 5 out of 5 
    Performance: 5 out of 5 
    Usability: 5 out of 5
    Feelgood factor: 5 out of 5 
    CAR's Rating: 5 out of 5 (*****)

    (17 January 2019)

    At a glance the new 911 doesn’t look like a new 911. That, you could argue, means Porsche has failed. Porsche would argue the opposite is true. Modern without being vogueish, relevant while also standing apart – these are the contradictions at the heart of the 911’s unique appeal, not to mention its longevity and rampant success.

    The new Porsche 911 reviewed by CAR magazine

    And so to the 992-generation car, which at once debuts a dizzying raft of technology, from electronically controlled turbo wastegates to frameless floating instrument displays, wet modes to thermal imaging night vision, but that also gleefully pinches design influences from its past. Undoubtedly more complex and advanced than the outgoing 991.2, is the new car actually better? And by a margin that makes any material difference? Let’s find out.

    Cockpit: the same, but better

    Only Porsche would engineer an all-new bodyshell – primarily now in aluminium (70%), a 911 first (the 991’s was 37% aluminium) – great swathes of the world’s population can’t tell apart from the old one, but it’s lighter, stiffer and, to these eyes at least, prettier (rear aspect excluded), and gets even better looking when you open the door and drop inside.  

    The new seats are slimmer, lighter, set lower and comfier. They are, effectively, perfect. The driving position is the same. And, in the right spec, the 911 now boasts a genuinely gorgeous interior for the first time that I can recall. 

    The super-simple dash and cabin architecture is concept-car cool and minimal, with bold, uncluttered horizontals, a smart gloss black centre console, an ace row of military looking toggle switches for functions like stability control and hazard lights (unrelated, obviously…) and the striking new driver’s instruments, which flank the bold analogue rev counter with digital displays. These offer a range of functionality, from a thermal imaging forward feed to a nav map, and go some way toward mitigating the 992’s lack of a head-up display.

    The new cockpit design gives the 992 a chameleon-like split personality; choose dark greys and metal finishes for a techy vibe, or throw in some wood and oxblood leather for something achingly cool and retro. 

    Sat-nav is overhauled for 2019

    So, it’s nice in here. Does it work? Broadly, yes. The Sport Chrono pack’s drive mode controller is a step backwards. Toggling between modes, you now have to keep an eye on the display rather than simply choosing from modes marked on the control. And let’s not even get started on the ‘motorsport inspired’ 20-second full everything powertrain nonsense. While the main interface is a touchscreen, with all the compromises that implies (especially in a sports car), it is at least a handsome, crisp and responsive touchscreen (smart too, enlarging tiles and offering options as your finger approached), and one that plays no small part in the 911’s newfound interior calm and classiness.  

    No manual gear lever? It’s coming, but not for 12 months, so for now it’s PDK only. Our man Georg Kacher has tried the manual though, and while the seven-speeder is improved, it’s still not as good as it should be – let alone as good as the GT cars’ six-speeder.

    Can we get moving now please?

    Absolutely – but are you prepared for just how quickly we’re now able to get moving? The 991 Carreras weren’t slow cars but the 992 shifts. Select Drive and manual shifting for the (now eight-speed) PDK box and pop her into Sport or Sport Plus: mash it. First 391lb ft and then 444bhp almost instantaneously get to work on those huge new 21-inch wheels and, in the Carrera S with the Sport Chrono pack, 62mph comes up in just 3.5sec. The similarly equipped 4S will do it in 3.4sec. It’s all just numbers, sure, but be in no doubt: base 911 performance has gone up a notch.

    Performance has gone up a level, and it's more accessible too

    On the road it’s an ever-present ally, this new engine, forever ready with convincing drive and always dusting your progress with turbo noises like whooshing turbines, fluttering wastegates and sonorous moans. More responsive than before? Perhaps, a touch, and this flat-six certainly feels more comfortable and smooth at lower revs, despite the higher compression ratio – perhaps a result of the new asymmetrical valve actuation, employed here to create swirl and improve fuel/air mixing at lower engine speeds. 

    Detail engine upgrades, then, though the performance lift over the outgoing S is significant and, coupled with the new eight-speed gearbox (with a shorter first and seventh and eighth as overdrives effectively), the new powertrain is almost impossible to catch out. On tortuous Spanish hill roads it thuds out of hairpins, gently over-rotating even warm P Zero Pirellis on a brush of throttle, before yelping from 4000rpm to just north of 7000rpm (the redline starts at 7400rpm; the limiter’s at 7500) in a spectacular display of drivability and simple, apparently effortless power. It even sounds quite good, if nothing like as good as recent non-turbo sixes, inevitably.

    Too much engine for the chassis?

    Not a bit of it, thankfully, though at first, as you put in some motorway miles to get to the good stuff, you’re worried Zuffenhausen accidentally built a GT. After all, the cabin now feels too slick and plush for a mere sports car, and the ride’s so impressively pliant – even on a 21-inch rear wheel, and with the more purposeful optional 10mm suspension drop – that you worry the 911’s gone soft. (The impressive ride is due in part to the lower pressures the bigger rear tyres can run, together with a new generation of adaptive damper).

    Leave the Drive Mode in Normal and the PDK box will also do its level best to hide the engine’s power, always reaching for the tallest possible ratio like a true a kid stretching for what it knows it can’t have. It’s quiet in here, too; really quiet. The smart new wing mirrors generate next to no turbulence, and even the roar of those huge rear tyres is well suppressed. Days at the wheel? You could do weeks in here, and still not want to get out.

    But the sports car is in there. Find some space, nudge into Sport, manual and the slacker Sport stability programme, go. The new powertrain piles on speed in a heartbeat (overtaking is child’s play), and soon you’re running into tight hairpins and fiendish little sequences at quite a rate. The brakes – ceramics on the 4S we tested, steels on the S, and with a more direct ratio and bigger rear discs on both – are supremely strong and feelsome, and able to handle it all, from walking pace town stuff to serious, speed-slaughtering stops.

    Get into the first few corners and you can’t help but feel you’ve accidentally been handed a not-yet-unveiled GTS (it’ll surely come) wearing the wrong badges. Front track width is up, boosting front-end grip and confidence, and the rack is quicker – now just 2.5 turns lock-to-lock, albeit with a variable rate on our Power Steering Plus-equipped test car (£185). And while grip at both ends is improved, it’s at the front that you really feel it, that telepathic, reassuringly accurate wheel delivering a change of direction from a front axle zealous in its dedication to catering for your every whim. So you lean on it harder and harder, running optimistic entry speeds with nothing more complicated than a lift of the throttle and a roll of the wheel – and you’re through and gone.

    But the 992 hasn’t forgotten how to be a 911. It still feels uniquely centre-pivoted, and its balance and attitude are still hardwired to wheel and pedals in that uniquely satisfying 911 way, the car delighted to be rotated on the brakes (in the dry, understeer barely enters the equation on the road, and is progressive and easily mitigated on track), ferociously grippy through the turn and blessed with so much corner-exit grip a clean exit is always an option (as is a less clean, slightly more fun one…). 

    So it handles. Almost more impressive is that the 992 does so while never feeling in any way digital or synthetic – a miracle given the myriad systems involved, from the optional rear-wheel steering (£1592) to adaptive dampers (standard – the 10mm lower Sport set-up is £665), active anti-roll bars (PDDC, optional, £2273) to a torque-vectoring diff (standard). The net result is a car of such towering ability and appeal that it effectively broadens its remit. You could cover hundreds of miles cross-country without really trying, using the Porsche as a Very Good Normal Car. But it’s also so rewarding to thrash you’ll be up early and out every summer Sunday morning just to feel it do its thing one more time.

    There’s got to be something wrong with it?

    Agreed, though the advantage of developing the same car for half a century is surely a product that can’t help but be good by now – and the 992 is good. But its engine could sound better, certainly, the touchscreen interface could be more intuitive, less cluttered and less obtuse (there’s so much going on even the Home screen can’t show all the main functions at once – you have to scroll down through a column of them), the steering could be brighter and a little lighter, the voice recognition system could work full-stop, and the rear end could be better looking. 

    It could also have a manual gearbox option from launch, and a really good six-speeder in place of the compromised seven-speed it will get. It could also be cheaper too, of course (lay into those options and it’s easy to skip over £100k – we’ll drill into which ones you really need in the near future). But if this all sounds a little like nit-picking there’s a good reason for that.

    New Porsche 911 (992): verdict

    Perhaps the most amazing thing about Porsche’s 911 is that so few choose to directly challenge it. Who doesn’t want a pretty, fairly practical £95k coupe able to be pretty much anything you’d like it to be; feelgood daily, track tool, special GT or an enviably bold family car set to become part of the family? All but unchallenged, Porsche could have phoned-in the 992.

    But spend a few days digging into the substance beneath the 992’s admittedly familiar surface and you appreciate the effort that’s gone into every detail of the thing, from the more responsive turbos’ cleaner plumbing to the stunning cockpit’s design and materials splendour. And while modernity’s arrived in the form of keyless go, the new displays, particulate filters and an ‘uncrashable’ Wet mode, the sports car within survives intact.

    The 992 isn’t flawless, and there’s plenty of scope for further development in any number of directions, from Turbo to GT3. But this 911 in Carrera S form is superb. A wickedly capable and rewarding driving tool, convincingly versatile like few rival sports cars and painfully desirable, it’s a masterful reinvention of a timeless concept. Furious at five stars across the board (or scores of at least 80% in each area, which the car surely deserves)? Don’t be. Drive it.  

    Link: https://www.carmagazine.co.uk/car-reviews/porsche/911-992/

     Smiley 


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    New Porsche 911 review: the Chris Harris verdict (Top Gear)

    (17 January 2019)

    Yep, you’re correct – it doesn’t look much different from the last one. Which itself was quite clearly related to the one before it and, now you come to mention it, wasn’t dissimilar to the one before that.

    There were a couple before that one which bore an uncanny resemblance to the new 2019 992’s lozenge silhouette too, because, and this might come as a shock, if you take a rear-engined coupe, give it a pair of small rear seats and a low bonnet line, you’ll end up with something that looks like a 911 pretty much every time.

    Many people don’t like this styling outcome. “It looks like the last one,” they froth around internet forums. “It’s an a**faced s**tbox”, they say as they mangle PJ O’Rourke’s harsh but historically and anatomically correct summary of Porsche’s strange little sports car that, well, just so happens to be the most successful of them all. The most recognisable, the most complete and the most long-lived. Rolex isn’t about to redesign the Submariner, and Kenwood leaves its food mixer looking like a stage prop from Hancock’s Half Hour – because they found something that works and stuck with it.

    Of course, the 911 has evolved since 1964. It is bigger in every way, bar, perhaps, tyre sidewall height. It is faster and cleaner and more comfortable. It is safer and, now we’re on the subject, from the front, it is largely indistinguishable from the 991 it replaces. The rear is more distinctive, or – as many are saying – more ugly.

    There is now only one body width, which is 44mm wider than the outgoing narrow-body version. You have to admire Porsche’s stubborn refusal to change the way the 911 looks, because the list of changes underneath would have most carmakers making all manner of phoney claims. The new body structure uses more aluminium and is stiffer. The engine is now located further forwards and mounted directly to the chassis. The wheelbase is longer, the rear wheels now steer and engines are revised. Does it drive differently than before? Yes, but not to the extent that you’d want to take the challenge to prove as much. This is not a radical departure, and perhaps now is a good time to acknowledge that last year’s 991 Carrera S was a brilliant car. Even as it was about to end production, it was still the best car in its class, so Porsche really is going to have to make a hash of this 992 if that situation is going to change.

    But there is a little controversy, because Porsche has to have some sport with adenoidal types who don’t like change. The doorhandles are now flush with the panel, and pop out when you unlock the door. Trouble is, they are easily confused and sometimes don’t present themselves. I’m not sure what was wrong with the old doorhandles. The beards will not like this.

    The interior is going to cause consternation for those still bemoaning a lack of fan-cooling for the engine and the unification of both Germanys. This is 911-meets-Panamera, with a big info screen and assorted buttons on the centre console. The analogue central rev-counter remains and is flanked by two screens which, from my driving position, were hidden behind the steering wheel. You see, Porsche is so keen to look after the retro-wingers, it still deliberately engineers some poor ergonomics into its new cars to keep them happy. Now that’s brand management for you.

    The new Carrera S motor is an evolution of the last 991 engine. It displaces 2,981cc and now produces 444bhp and 391lb ft at 2,300–5,000rpm. The crankcase is carried over, but the intake and injection system is new, as are the turbochargers and a WLTP-compliant exhaust particulate filter. The gearbox is an all-new eight-speed dual-clutch self-shifter and, with the optional Sport Chrono package fitted, it can change gears even faster. Anyone who thinks this isn’t a great all-round powertrain package for a contemporary sports car needs their head examined. Throttle response is so good you really do wonder if it’s turbocharged, and the performance is very strong. From 3,000 to 6,000rpm it feels GT3 quick, and the noises inside the cabin are familiar flat-six with enough intake howl to make you smile. From the outside, the car is quieter now. The WLTP regulations really are killing off shouty, valved exhausts, and I actually couldn’t give a fig. If I’m driving, I want all the quality engine tunes for myself and would rather not annoy other people with them. For once, I agree with a piece of engine legislation, which is an odd feeling.

    The driving position is low and infinitely adjustable. The wheel is a good size and offers an update on the rotary knob that selects the car’s driving mode. I love the new rev-counter, deeply cowled and with a design that deliberately copies Sixties and Seventies 911s. In fact, the cabin just works – the materials are very high quality, the scuttle is low, so the cabin strikes a good balance between feeling cosy and not being too intimidating. And never forget those rear seats – for quick trips to the pub or making little people smile, they are fantastic – and no other car of this type offers them.

    There are a couple of specific cock-ups inside. The frankly brilliantly integrated dual cupholders first introduced in the 997 have been replaced by a single obstacle for your elbow and another pop-out thingy over by the passenger door. This is rubbish. And every time I climbed out, I caught my pinkie in the interior doorhandle. This might just be me being an a**e.

    I only drove the car on a flat circuit, so I can’t tell you anything about ride comfort or how it might behave on the road, but I can tell you that the rear steering is as successful as it is in the GT3. If you want to witness engineering achievements, then document the change from the 991’s simply awful electric power steering at launch to where the 992 now finds itself. The weighting is near-perfect, the car changes direction so cleanly and, of course, you have the added benefit of a tiny turning circle.

    The gearbox is good, with one note – even with Sport Chrono fitted, the shifts didn’t feel that quick, but they were smooth enough, so I can’t really complain. A seven-speed manual will be available later this year. The 992 is the first ‘normal’ 911 to use different diameter wheels front to rear. Those sexy rear arches have space enough for 22-inch rear rims, and the rubber is wide enough to give good traction. A locking differential is standard on the S, and should you want to slide the thing around, you can.

    To drive, it just feels like logical evolution of the 991. That might sound like faint praise, but in the face of ever-stringent legislation, and in the knowledge of how good the old car was, that’s quite a compliment. I couldn’t get a squeak of complaint from the optional carbon-ceramic brakes, and the all-round grip levels were very high. And for all the electronics, this car still feels rear-engined. You just can’t hide its core physics. Switch off the ESP and brake a little too hard into a corner, and the rear will just begin to rotate. This is core 911 DNA and it’s here in the 992, just as it was the 901 in 1964.

    Yes, some people will say that it’s too big and too much of a GT car and lacking in ‘feel’. But they can buy a GT3 or take up bobsledding – because, out there in the real world, I suspect that this thing will be all the 911 most people will ever need. Looks good in yellow, too.

    Link: https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/porsche/s-2dr-pdk/first-drive-2

    Smiley


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    High praise, right from the start. That wasn't the case with the 991, all will be well with this 911.


    --

    1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3  / 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS (sold) / 2011 Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG Performance / 2014 BMW-Alpina D3 biturbo Touring / 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Clubsport


    Re: OFFICIAL: The new Porsche 992 – a design icon and high-tech sports car

    If you put a GT3 front end "feeling" into a normal 911 you have won already a lot of hearts !kiss


     
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