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    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam members gathered from across the globe to compare their favourite coffee...  1550096185373image.gif

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    ...now we just need some new tyres! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    After endless debate over the Audi R8 and Porsche 911, Rennteam members arranged a comparison test...  1550096185373image.gif

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    ...with a little help from BBC Top Gear! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam contributor Andrew Frankel recommended that Porsche develop a 911 hybrid... 1538770913308image.gif

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    ...thanks to Autocar!  1550096185373image.gif


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    At the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, Porsche will unveil the spiritual successor to the legenday Porsche 804... Smiley

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    ...the top secret project has been developed by Porsche with Rennteam members Gordon Murray and Chris Craft as special advisers... Smiley

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    ...thanks to Gordon and Chris! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    The recent Cars and Coffee gathering organised by Rennteam in the UK was held at the BBC Top Gear test track at Dunsfold Aerodrome.. Smiley

    ...the weather turned out to be a little unpredictable... Smiley

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    Video Link:  https://youtu.be/P3y1D3PGxIE

    ...thanks to Rennteam moderator Tiff Needell for organising the film crew! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Honda consulted with a select group of Rennteam members on their new range of EVs... Smiley

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    ...the Rennteam members' advice to "give them a personality" seems to have been taken on board by Honda...  1550096185373image.gif

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    ...thanks to Honda for the invitation! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    In 2018, Rennteam members sponsored the annual pub quiz at Goodwood Revival, where rival team captains Andrew Frankel and James May got into a heated debate over the rather simple first question...  1550096185373image.gif

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    Goodwood Revival Pub Quiz

    Q1) "What is enough?"

    ... 

    (Sponsored by Rennteam)

    To settle the debate, Andrew Frankel decided to write an article for Autocar magazine on the topic... Smiley

    "McLaren Senna vs Alpine A110: can less be more?" (Autocar)

    We drive a McLaren Senna and an Alpine A110 on a mountain road to see when enough is enough in the race for more power, speed and grip

    -- Article by Andrew Frankel

    (2 March 2019)

    This is not a twin test. There will be no winner or loser, the cars featured merely illustrative of a point I thought I wanted to make. 

    The McLaren Senna seen here could as easily have been any other hypercar or, indeed, top-flight supercar like a Ferrari 812 Superfast or Lamborghini Aventador SVJ. Similarly, although the Alpine A110 is undeniably well suited to the task in hand, a Lotus Elise would have sufficed. 

    So those hoping for a David and Goliath contest where the little £50k sports car fells three-quarters of a million quid’s worth of carbonfibre-bodied hypercar are going to be sorely disappointed. There are some architectural and conceptual similarities between them – mid-engine configurations, seven-speed paddle-shift transmissions, an admirable focus on lightweight construction and so on – but probably the most significant thing they share, and what puts them in one of the most exclusive of automotive clubs, is that both come complete with five-star Autocar road test ratings. And nothing you’re about to read changes that in any way. 

    Instead, we’re here in the Welsh mountains to ask a question and, hopefully, provide an answer. The question is simple: what is ‘enough’? I don’t really want to be more precise than that, because the moment I say ‘enough power’, then that has to be tempered with considerations of weight, torque and delivery. It would be better to call it ‘enough performance’, but to most people, that is simply a straight-line measure. Hold a gun to my head and I’d define the question as this: how much dynamic ability of all kinds can be used on even world-class public roads like these, and are those that provide more just wasting it, or is there a delicious pleasure in the simple knowledge that it’s there, which, in a very real way, adds further to the enjoyment of such cars? 

    So the real point of having these two here is that they are the absolute best at what they do. The Alpine is that rarest of things today: a genuine game changer in the way it combines extraordinary feel and response in daily-driver civility. I expect we’ve not seen an all-new car do that job so well for merely mortal money since the launch of the Porsche 911 55 years ago, and I don’t exaggerate one bit. The Senna? It may not actually change the game, but by moving it so far away from the reach of normal supercars, it might as well have done. In terms of genuine road car ability, pure, outright and all-round pace, I doubt a car has expanded the envelope of supercar ability so comprehensively since McLaren launched another quite useful device called the F1 almost a quarter of a century ago. 

    There was a time, not that long ago, when a simple road tester like me would have approached a car of even the Alpine’s potential with a sense of, if not actual trepidation, then at least a certain nerviness derived from the fact that here was something different, something with a potential that it would be hard to find elsewhere. When I started doing this job 30 years ago, the fastest machine Autocar had a hope of being able to borrow was a Ferrari Testarossa. You took a big breath before aiming that up a mountain road, believe me, for I remember doing exactly that on exactly this road. And yet both its power-to-weight ratio and torque-to-weight ratio are only a fraction ahead of where the Alpine sits today. And the Alpine, with its Mégane powertrain, is a car that deliberately, almost wilfully, thumbs its nose at the more-more-more brigade. That is how far we’ve come. Indeed, the very purpose of its existence appears to act as an antidote for those who feel the arms race is out of control. 

    So join me for a moment in its snug, compact yet surprisingly spacious cockpit. There’s a happy bark when you hit the button that brings it to life and it deepens a shade when you press the red ‘Sport’ button on its steering wheel. The road is long and quick, but sinuous, constantly moving in all three dimensions.  

    The car feels right from the exit of the car park. Confidence courses through your arteries. Short shift into second and let it go. The car is accelerating hard – Testarossa hard, remember – its motor starting to howl, so you grab another gear. From now on, you’ll only be in third and fourth. It’s that kind of road. 

    Underneath you, the Alpine feels so supple, so different from other cars. It’s breathing with the road, flowing across its surface and talking, always talking to you, through the steering in part but its chassis in the main. There’s no other car on sale in which it’s easier to establish a rhythm of driving. 

    It’s a car that quite brilliantly turns back the clock in not just what it does but also how it encourages you to think. At first, you’re disappointed in yourself because those thoughts are time-expired road testing clichés – man and machine in perfect harmony, how you need only think it around corners, all that hoary old guff – before you realise there are two reasons we don’t communicate in such terms any more, and only one of them is because such terms were worn out decades ago. The perhaps more pertinent reason is that cars don’t feel like that any longer. 

    Not once on that road did I crave another horsepower. Not once did I find myself lamenting its lack of apex speed. Out here in the real world, the £50k A110 with its 248bhp motor was the very definition of ‘enough’. Who could possibly want more? 

    Driving done, parked up next to the Senna, the answer is me, I’m afraid. 

    So let’s repeat the exercise in the McLaren. First thing you need to do is turn off the traction control, absurd I know, but I’ve learned from prior experience that if you leave it on, what you get is Diet Senna in such an unobtrusive form that you may not even realise you’re experiencing a fraction of its potential.  

    And now the rules change completely. This is no longer an exercise in unbridling your enthusiasm. I know from the start that, most of all, this is going to be an exercise in saintly restraint. What this car can do is so far beyond what this road can safely take that the most I can hope for is a taste, a mere flavour of what it has to offer. 

    We’ll forget the first two ratios straight away, and the top end of the power band, too. If this car is to be contained, it will be only on a gear-up, revs-down basis. Still, when the torque chimes in, you are instantly busy. Even like this, the Senna asks a lot of its driver. And do you know what? I don’t mind at all. It is a captivating, electrifying experience, a real challenge to your abilities as a driver. By which I don’t mean that it will spit you into the heather – although if you were casual with it, I don’t doubt that it would – but that if you’re to make the most of the experience, you’re going to need every mote of concentration you can gather. 

    Try not to grip the wheel too hard. Accept that, with tyres that wide, it’s going to hunt about a bit. Try to relax. Try not to leap like a startled rabbit every time that 789bhp motor thinks of a new way to propel you through an entire delivery round of postcodes at a single prod of the pedal. Try to enjoy it. Ignore the slight sweat and don’t worry about that strange sound. It’s not the car making it. It’s you. Concentrate on keeping it clean. Find the apex and don’t fret about the grip: however ludicrously over-specified this car is in straight-line terms, it is even more so when it comes to corners. Be smooth, of course, but deliberate, too. You’re in charge even though, at times, it may not seem that way. Feel what it is like to bathe in an ocean of excess and to know its depths lie many miles out of reach. 

    Is it glorious, or just frustrating? Well, both, but more the former than the latter, and this is what I found fascinating about the exercise. The single most significant factor in the sensation of speed is not actually how fast you’re going, but the environment in which you find yourself. Sit at 600mph in a Boeing 747 at 40,000ft and you’ll see what I mean. Just because you can’t savour all or even more than a small part of what a Senna can do when confined to the public road, this doesn’t mean that what it can do is any the less exciting for that. Indeed, knowing there is an effectively bottomless pit of ability provides a driving dimension all of its own. Just by seeing how deeply you can safely draw from it is a fascinating exercise in its own right, requiring techniques and rigour that simply don’t apply to the Alpine.  

    Don’t mistake me: I’ve been lucky enough to have done many laps of a long and fast race track in a Senna, put it in Race mode and driven it as rapidly as I knew how, which was where it showed me things I didn’t think a road car could do. But even that was slightly frustrating because at Estoril it was still being held back, but this time by the current limits of street tyre technology. More than any car wearing a numberplate that I’ve driven, the Senna simply screams for a slick on the track, and when the GTR version arrives next year, a slick it will get. 

    The point is that wherever you go, whatever you drive and however you drive it, there’s always going to be something sub-optimal. Not enough power, too much power, wrong sort of road, wrong kind of weather. The secret is to find a car that strikes the best balance and affords you the greatest opportunity to enjoy the best possible driving experience on the largest number of opportunities. And because it’s not interested in going fast, that is why the Alpine probably scores more highly in more areas than any other car on sale. 

    And yet the essential paradox remains: if I were to offer you a bottle of something nice from the Waitrose fine wine department or merely a taste of Château Pétrus, which would you choose? There is no correct answer: I’d probably go Waitrose because in wine, as in too many other things, I am a complete philistine. But there would be others who might have spent a lifetime wondering what it would be like to feel the world’s finest claret suffuse their taste buds. And the chance to experience it would be worth not a bottle or even a case of anything more mundane but a lifetime supply. The Senna is the Pétrus. 

    Which would I take along that road again? Has to be the Alpine, doesn’t it? It exists at the very limit of what can sensibly be deployed in public. It is a joyous thing to drive, a result of some exquisitely clear thinking, maybe even a work of genius.  

    But actually? I’ll take the Senna, thanks. And so would you. It’s a Senna for goodness’ sake. You’d not turn down that experience, any more than you’d not watch a five-star film on an aircraft because the screen’s not big enough. You get the chance and you take it, even if the circumstances are not ideal. So yes, the Alpine is the very definition of ‘enough’, the Senna the absolute embodiment of ‘too much’. And I won’t be the first to observe that too much of a good thing can sometimes be absolutely wonderful. 

    Link:   https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/features/mclaren-senna-vs-alpine-a110-can-less-be-more

    A brilliantly written article by the talented Andrew Frankel... Smiley 

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    ...but James May did not agree with the conclusion... Smiley

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    ...thanks to Andrew Frankel and James May! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    butler0-R3-E033.jpgMe in my 904 GTS in 1978....


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Wonderbar:

    butler0-R3-E033.jpgMe in my 904 GTS in 1978....

    Great photo sir! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    We asked Rennteam members in a survey to explain...  1550096185373image.gif

    "Why Porsche 911 Drivers Love Their Favorite Sports Car" Smiley

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    ...keep a look out for the famous duck-tail spoiler! Smiley

    ...thanks for all your contributions! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam was given an exclusive press invitation to the Geneva Motor Show 2019... Smiley

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    ...thanks for the generous hospitality! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    We asked Rennteam members to send in their best home-made driving videos...  1538770913308image.gif

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    ...turn up the volume! Smiley

    ...thanks and all due credit to Chris Harris, Tiff Needell and Marino Franchitti! 


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Even though it's a few years old now, that is probably the best car video ever made...kiss


    --

    "Things turn out best for those who make the best of the way things turn out."


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    +1


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Our latest nomination for Rennteam post of the week...

    Wonderbar:

    butler0-R3-E049 (2).jpgGrant, thanks for posting the 2.7 RS.  Many folks are not aware that there was a 3.0 RS.  Basically the homologation for the IROC RSRs. Here is my car, which I brought over new from Sonauto in 1974.  There were 106 made, and this was #106.  A handful to drive, with severe oversteer, but loads of fun.  Sadly, I didn't know what I had, and sold it three years later.  It sold at auction in 2018, for 1.4 million.  Oh well...laugh

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    ...thanks Wonderbar! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam member (and Top Gear presenter) Chris Harris kindly offered to upload a short film with his car buying advice... Smiley

    ...thanks and all due credit to Chris Harris! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam driving master Tim Schrick gives his verdict on the new Porsche 992 Carrera S...  1552170150971image.gif

    ...thanks Tim! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    C63 and E63 (his favorite over the M5)...I like Chris Harris. Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Rennteam driving master Tim Schrick gives his verdict on the new Porsche 992 Carrera S...  1552170150971image.gif

    Quick English summary, please?


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    I try: Car does what driver wants ... a real sportscar ... what a pity: no manual indecision

     

     


    --

    -----------------------------------

    BMW i8 * RRS 


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Sidney:

    I try: Car does what driver wants ... a real sportscar ... what a pity: no manual indecision

     

     

    SmileySmiley 


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016), Mercedes E63 S AMG Edition 1 (2018), Mercedes C63 S AMG Cab (2019), Range Rover Evoque Si4 Black Edition (2019)


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Sidney:

    I try: Car does what driver wants ... a real sportscar ... what a pity: no manual indecision

     

     

    Thank you!


    --

    18 GT3 Manual, 73 Carrera RS 2.7 Carbon Fiber replica (1,890 lbs), 06 EVO9 with track mods. Former: 16 Cayman GT4, 73 911S, Two 951S's, 996 C2, 993 C2, 98 Ferrari 550, 79 635CSi


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam member (and Top Gear presenter) Chris Harris was invited to drive the amazing Porsche 919 Hybrid...  1552170150971image.gif

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    ...thanks for the cool video Chris! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Porsche 911 RSR wins 2019 Sebring 12-hour race driven by Rennteam members Nick Tandy, Patrick Pilet and Frédéric Makowiecki...  1552170150971image.gif

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    Super in Sebring: Porsche also wins the twelve-hour race

    Race GT, IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, round 2, Sebring/USA

    Stuttgart. Porsche has notched up yet another victory at the “Super Sebring” race weekend. Nick Tandy (Great Britain) and his French teammates Patrick Pilet and Frédéric Makowiecki took the flag in first place in the Porsche 911 RSR at the twelve-hour race of the IMSA Weathertech SportsCar Championship. With this success, the trio in the No. 911 car have not only repeated their win from last year, but also rounded off an extremely successful weekend for Porsche. A day earlier, the ca. 510 hp racing car from Weissach had won both GTE classes at the 1,000-mile race of the Sports Car World Endurance Championship WEC. The No. 912 sister car driven by Earl Bamber (New Zealand), Laurens Vanthoor (Belgium) and Mathieu Jaminet (France) finished the thrilling long-distance classic in the USA on fifth place. 

    Early on in the race, lack of grip in the heavy rain initially threw both Porsche 911 RSR down the field. As conditions improved at the half-way point of the race, the experienced Porsche GT Team utilised every last strength of the car. Thanks to great tactics, top-class driving and flawless teamwork, the No. 911 car fought its way back into the lead. In a gripping finale, Nick Tandy fended off all attacks and crossed the finish line after twelve hours with a 1.951-second lead. Tandy, Pilet and Makowiecki are the first driver trio to win the IMSA race at Sebring twice in a row. Thanks to their victory, the No. 911 crew now ranks first in the overall classification. The No. 912 line-up fell back two laps in the early phase. Putting in a spirited charge through the field, the Daytona podium finishers concluded the race on fifth. 

    In the GTD class, the Porsche 911 GT3 R fielded by the Pfaff Motorsports customer team held the lead for about half of the race distance. The rewards for this strong performance from Porsche development driver Lars Kern (Germany) and his Canadian teammates Scott Hargrove and Zacharie Robichon were few. While switching out a faulty sensor in the 500 hp GT3 racer from Weissach, the squad lost crucial ground and reached the flag after twelve hours in tenth. Prior to this, the trio had held a comfortable lead over long stretches. In the identical vehicle run by Park Place Motorsports, Porsche factory driver Patrick Long (USA) and his compatriots Nicholas Boulle and Patrick Lindsey narrowly missed out on climbing the podium with sixth place. 

    Round three of the IMSA Weathertech SportsCar Championship will be contested on 13 April in Long Beach (USA).

    Comments on the race
    Fritz Enzinger (Vice President Motorsport): “I’ve been in motorsport for a long time, but I’ve never experienced anything like this. Within 48 hours we won a 1,000-mile race and a twelve-hour race with our factory teams at one venue. That’s phenomenal. I was impressed by how focussed every single person worked. That’s what sets Porsche apart. And we mustn’t forget the successful performances from our customer teams. It was one of the best motor racing weekends I’ve ever experienced – just brilliant.” 

    Pascal Zurlinden (Director GT Factory Motorsport): “Perhaps we should rename the event the “Porsche Super Sebring” race weekend. Three pole positions, three victories – what more could you want. Our team did everything right. Ultimately, when things went down to the wire, we were there. The key moment was when we reclaimed the lead after a perfectly timed pit stop. Our strategy was to wait and strike at the right moment. Now it’s time to celebrate!”

    Patrick Pilet (Porsche 911 RSR #911): “It somehow feels unreal. We started from pole position, and then we were running last, and now we celebrate our second Sebring victory in a row – unbelievable! Our team is simply something very special. We never gave up, we always believed that we had a chance and now we’re standing here as winners. It’s indescribable.” 

    Nick Tandy (Porsche 911 RSR #911): “It was a totally crazy race that one rarely experiences. We got the lot: extremely wet at the beginning, a dry track, then predicted rain, which didn’t eventuate. We started from pole, then quickly fell back, only to end up in the lead again. You only get such things at a long-distance race. And this is the precisely the kind of discipline that Porsche excels at. Never give up, always push and then pull out all stops at the right moment. That’s how it’s done.”

    Frédéric Makowiecki (Porsche 911 RSR #911): “I’m lost for words. We had major problems in the rain early on in the race, but we battled our way forward again in an incredible manner. Like last year, it was a perfect team effort. With such successes, it really becomes clear just how important it is for the entire squad to work perfectly.” 

    Earl Bamber (Porsche 911 RSR #912): “Initially, both Porsche 911 RSR lost ground in the rain. But we got faster later on. Unfortunately the timing of a pit stop didn’t work out for us. While our sister car regained the lead, we were still a lap down. We fought hard, but we couldn’t really do much. Congratulations to our colleagues. It was a dream weekend for Porsche.”

    Laurens Vanthoor (Porsche 911 RSR #912): “Unfortunately we lost too much time in the rainy start phase. Otherwise we could have fought for victory. Our car was incredibly good, especially on slicks in the final phase. For me personally, I’m a bit disappointed. But it is outweighed by the joy of an incredibly successful weekend for Porsche.”

    Mathieu Jaminet (Porsche 911 RSR #912): “Of course I’d have loved to win, so I regard this weekend with mixed feelings. From Porsche’s point of view, however, it was a dream. From our perspective, that of the number 912 car, it’s kind of sad. We could have won, too, but it didn’t work out this time. Still, we’re delighted for our teammates.”

    Race result
    GTLM class
    1. Pilet/Tandy/Makowiecki (F/GB/F), Porsche 911 RSR, 330 laps
    2. Hand/Müller/Bourdais (USA/D/F), Ford GT, 330 laps
    3. Garcia/Magnussen/Rockenfeller (E/DK/D), Corvette C7.R, 330 laps
    5. Bamber/Vanthoor/Jaminet (NZ/B/F), Porsche 911 RSR, 330 laps

    GTD class
    1. Ineichen/Bortolotti/Breukers (CH/I/NL), Lamborghini Huracan GT3, 320 laps
    2. Potter/Lally/Pumpelly (USA/USA/USA), Lamborghini Huracan GT3, 320 laps
    3. MacNeil/Vilander/Westphal (USA/FIN/USA), Ferrari 488 GT3, 320 laps
    6. Long/Lindsey/Boulle (USA/USA/USA), Porsche 911 GT3 R, 320 laps
    10. Kern/Robichon/Hargrove (D/CDN/CDN), Porsche 911 GT3 R, 318 laps
     

    Link:  https://presse.porsche.de/prod/presse_pag/PressResources.nsf/Content?ReadForm&languageversionid=955663

    Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    My son and I were there—never seen more thrilling finishes. In the 12 hour, Tandy was leading by 2 seconds when yellow flag came out and bunched entire field together, Under green, it was a one lap dash through heavy night traffic.  Masterful, brilliant driving...👍


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Rennteam legend spotted driving his Porsche 911 GT3 RS on MotorWeek's track test... Smiley

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    ...great driving nberry! Smiley


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Boxster Coupe GTS:

    Rennteam legend spotted driving his Porsche 911 GT3 RS on MotorWeek's track test... Smiley

    Best one yet Smiley.


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    A couple of Rennteam members attempt to settle the classic Ferrari vs Lamborghini debate... 1553032464632image.gif

    1553032616732image.jpeg

    ...turn up the volume! Smiley

    ...with an old school rolling-start drag race!  1552170150971image.gif


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Irony that Harry's cars which adorn the set of Top Gear are first put to use on the Grand Tour....


    --

    991 Carrera Black Edition, XC90 Black\Black - 2 kids, 1 dog


    Re: Welcome to Rennteam: Cars and Coffee... (photos)

    Thank you for my partial redemption. I’m still trying to live down the Starbucks picture. indecision


    --

    There is nothing stronger than gentleness.


     
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