Crown

Board: Porsche - Carrera GT / 918 Language: English Region: Worldwide Share/Save/Bookmark Close

Forum - Thread


    Re: 918 latest news

    Same black 918, now in Germany:

    porsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_8.jpgporsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_10.jpgporsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_6.jpgporsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_5.jpgporsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_3.jpgporsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_1.jpg


    --


    Re: 918 latest news

    And again the panel gaps around the (left)  headlight mail
    ... is this still a pre-production car?


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: 918 latest news

    Joost:

    And again the panel gaps around the (left)  headlight mail
    ... is this still a pre-production car?

    Don't be so picky. A minor detail SmileySmiley


    --

    2014 981 Boxster S | Riviera Blue | PDK | Sport Suspension (-20mm) | PCCB | PTV | PSE
    2010 997.2 C2S | Carrara White | Manual | S-PASM (-20mm) | PSE | OZ Superforgiata
    2010 Audi S5 cabrio | Ibis White

    Previous
    2008 997.1 C4S | Guards Red | Manual | PSE | Bilstein PSS10 | H&R Roll Bars | Dension 500
    2007 997.1 Turbo | Meteor Gray | Manual | Bilstein PSS10 | Cargraphic Stage 2 | Dension 500
    2005 987.1 Boxster S | Arctic Silver | Manual | OZ Ultraleggera | H&R Cup Suspension | H&R Roll Bars | Sachs Racing Clutch | Recaro Shells
    2005 997.1 C2S | Atlas Gray | Manual | PSE | Sport Suspension (-20mm)


    Re: 918 latest news

    Yep, there is no production cars on the roads. Production will start in March.
    --

    sportcars-history.com


    Re: 918 latest news

    Guys, those are NOT panel gaps next to the headlights - the metal sheets have different "heights" - it therefore looks like different gap sizes on a 2D photo, but they are perfect.


    Re: 918 latest news

    TurboRalf,
    I am not sure I understand you correctly.
    A. Are these metal panels or carbon fibre panels?
    B. Different hieights... do you mean position wise or the thickness of the panels?
    If you refer to the position, I agree that on some pictures the position looks better than on others, so it might just be a result of the 2D pictures, but I am not sure, it really looks like the panel is not flush with the headlight unit.
    If you refer to the thickness; I think both panels should both connect to the headlight cluster and be flush with each other... 

    In the end, I think this will be a non-issue; if it really is an issue, they will sove it before production of customer cars. No customer will accept the car when the panels are off...


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: 918 latest news

    porsche-918-spyder-c673231122013191930_4.jpg


    --


    Re: 918 latest news

    Here are two pictures of "more finished"cars, which were presented in Spain. The above issue seems fixed to me...2015 Porsche 918 Spyder _83_.jpg

    2015 Porsche 918 Spyder _12_.JPG


    Re: 918 latest news

    Btw, one great picture in hi ress, which I found on Facebook... smileynormal.jpg


    Re: 918 latest news

    Looking better every time I see it. Really starting to grow on me. I've always loved those wheels with the green calipers.


    Re: 918 latest news

    That black car a few posts up was a early prototype. The show car I saw in Palm Springs and LA Autoshow has perfect fit and finish. Also, that black car doesn't have the badges yet.


    --

     


    Re: 918 latest news

    Thanks for all the pics and additional info! I can sleep calmlly now :-D


    --

    Porsche, seperates LeMans from LeBoys

    Re: 918 latest news

    Porsche 918 Spyder on track with Top Gear... (Stig Polska)

    Porsche 918 Spyder on track with Top Gear -- (Stig Polska) -- Video Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news

    Wow that 997 GT3 is FAST!!! haha

     


    --

     


    Re: 918 latest news

    Porsche 918 Spyder -- Interview with Frank Walliser by ExceIIence...

    The project leader of the 918 tells us about Porsche's new supercar...

    (5 December 2013)
     
    Excellence: The 918 represents the pinnacle of Porsche technology right now. How will that transfer to more accessible Porsche models?
     
    Dr. Walliser: Yes, that’s right, it’s the pinnacle. Definitely the most advanced car in the Porsche fleet. I would even say it’s the most advanced car in the automotive industry at the moment.
     
    It has already trickled down, as the Panamera SE Hybrid is also on the market as a plug-in hybrid. Those projects walked along together. The 918 definitely had more engineering freedom and was our interpretation of a hybrid for a sports car, which was so far not solved.
     
    What we learned on the electric motors and the integration of the hybrid drivetrain and the advantages of a hybrid drivetrain in a sports car, it will come down. On the sports car side it will not come down that fast; it will come on the front-engine models like Panamera and Cayenne. It will be faster. Sports cars, especially 911, it’s a challenge for the packaging, but for sure next generation we will have a very close look at a hybrid.
     
    Excellence: Certainly one of the challenges must have been making all of these separate drive components behave as one “team.” Do you feel you’ve succeeded in making the 918 not just fast, which we now know it certainly is, but also dynamically pure as a Porsche?
     
    Dr. Walliser: Yes, it drives like a Porsche. It was always a target, not just making it only fast. Day to day usability was always very important to us. Whether it’s in E-mode, or hybrid or sport or race, it always behaves like a Porsche. It’s easy driving and a very honest car, very direct. The usability of the performance is unbelievable.
     
    Excellence: How do you make that happen with so much electronic technology? How do you keep it pure like that?
     
    Dr. Walliser: It has a lot to do with, let me say, setting very general targets for the engineers working on it, so they have a clear orientation where to go. If the targets are too detailed, we lose the direction. So we said, on the driving modes we have a mode for the guys concentrating on the fuel consumption, another one for the guys on the Nürburgring, so everybody can work with their directions. And we have experienced people who have a certain feeling for how a Porsche should behave.
     
    Excellence: What other developments would you consider major challenges?
     
    Dr. Walliser: Number one, it’s a completely new car. Just the sheer number of new parts…besides some nuts and bolts, everything is really new: new engine, almost new gearbox, hybrid drivetrain, the battery, the chassis, the monocoque. This was a challenge in just three years. Integration of this hybrid drivetrain, having a high-voltage system, you have to always be sure that it’s safe. At the end of the day it’s really integration, that all systems work together. That was the major challenge. To give you an idea, just to simply stop the car—brake, and it stops—you need the four-wheel management, you need the ESP, you need the I-booster, the new braking system, you need the gearbox, you need the engine and the two electric modules. You have to record the sources of torque and the downshift, just to make the car stop. And sometimes you get a result and say, “Hey guys, you may get one shot a week [to improve it] and now we have to work step by step and make it smooth and good.”
     
    Sometimes over the development, week by week, we’d detect things in the car, how they work, and we’d just understand how it’s supposed to end. It was a challenge, but if you have an experienced team like we have you will always find the solution.
     
    Excellence: What was the easiest part of the process?
     
    Dr. Walliser: Design. That sounds funny, but we had established the [design] concept for the project, and we felt our real challenge was to bring it out as fast as possible. We made decisions very fast, with a very direct connection among the staff. We’d discuss [an issue] and say, “Okay, let’s go in this direction.”
     
    Of course, I reported to the Board on a regular basis to update them on the technical progress, but the design was set. We did not have a lot of influences from outside; we kept it really closed, trying hard not to make all the decisions in committees in order to keep the car really sharp and focused.
     
    Excellence: What were the overall goals from the beginning?
     
    Dr. Walliser: Simple. We wanted to keep the design of the show car intact, get fuel consumption to three liters [per 100km] and return a Nürburgring time as fast as the Carrera GT. We hit the others, for sure. Eventually though, the ’Ring time was ten seconds faster than the Carrera GT, so we didn’t just hit this target, it was tremendously better.
     
    Excellence: To what extent did motorsport play a part in the development of the 918 Spyder?
     
    Dr. Walliser: We integrated [the 918 team into] the motorsport department so that [everyone] was in the same area, located where the LMP and GT program is based. We had a family of three: the 918 program, the GT program and the Le Mans program. The workshop is from motorsports, some of the engineers are also from motorsports, and a lot of the designers and engineers from the LMP2 project just came over to the 918 project. So a lot of experience from a variety of motorsports.
     
    Excellence: So you had a lot of motorsport talent working on the 918, but was there anything directly from your racing programs?
     
    Dr. Walliser: The engine. The engine is very, very close to the RS Spyder engine. In fact, it’s a totally new engine, unlike the V8 in our other cars. The ideas behind that design were chief engineered on the Mulsanne.
     
    We learned a lot. We had technical regulations based on a certain restrictor, so we learned a lot on friction reduction in the racing engine. The less friction you have, the more power you get out of the engine. For fuel consumption it’s exactly the same; bring down the friction of the engine and you’ll reduce the consumption and get a lot of power as well.
     
    The key to bring the fuel consumption of the car down is really in the engine, not so much the hybrid drivetrain.
     
    Excellence: You’ve drawn on the historical connection of the 917, which was never a road car. Why is this connection so important to the 918?
     
    Dr. Walliser: The 917 was the groundbreaking race car, maybe of the century, but definitely of its decade. It was something of a growing up for Porsche also, which was coming from all of these class victories as a small manufacturer [but never winning outright].
     
    Also in the background, the 911 was already for six years established when the 917 introduced turbocharging for the first time in racing, and then just four years later it appeared on the street car, the 911 Turbo. It was very extreme from a technology standpoint, with a magnesium tube frame, for instance; they tried everything and they spent a lot of money. It was really the big step for Porsche in its next generation—the most important moment, the next “form” of Porsche.
     
    You can’t compare the times directly, but…well, I’m not sure the general public will connect the 917 to the 918, but it provided a lot of internal fuel.
     
    Excellence: How necessary was it for Porsche’s newest supercar to employ a hybrid drivetrain?
     
    Dr. Walliser: The decision for the 918 was made in 2009. The merger with Volkswagen had just started, and the takeover trouble had just ended. It was necessary for Porsche from the inside to have a clear direction forward for the future. At the same time we had a hard economic crisis in the whole world, and the CO2 discussion was extremely hard in the US, in China and in Europe. And we realized that if sports cars disappeared, well, Porsche was gone. So we had to find a solution. We had the technology. And now the car is here.
     
    Excellence: As part of a larger company that also produces super cars, how does the 918 help Porsche maintain its unique identity?
     
    Dr. Walliser: I have a lot of colleagues [from other Volkswagen Group brands] that call every week and ask if they can have a ride in the 918! So I think there is a lot of interest from our new sisters and brothers in what we are doing, but the relationships are good. Talking to our colleagues from Bugatti and Lamborghini, I think it’s important that we have a good working relationship as small sports car manufacturers, but we have clearly different programs.
     
    I don’t think there will ever be a 918 with a Lamborghini badge, or Audi. We closed this discussion in the beginning. Even in the [Volkswagen] group, we still make the [Porsche] decisions. We told the board, “Nope, we will not report [on this project] except to the supervisory board.”
     
    I think this is part of the success story of the Volkswagen Group, that the brands are very alive, that they are not controlled from above. Each organization has its own culture. If you have several kids in your family, they all have their own character even though the parents are the same. It’s really about building these characters with the Volkswagen Group. The 918 is Porsche’s character.
     
    Excellence: With only 918 examples of the 918 Spyder being built, what comes next?
     
    Dr. Walliser: 919? No, just kidding! Honestly, a car like the 918 comes every decade, not every few years. Supercars are collector pieces, they’re fun. But we don’t always have to have a supercar. There’s been almost a decade since the Carrera GT. In five or ten years, or whenever we do another big project like this—whatever that is—it will serve as good motivation for members of the team to reach beyond.
     

    Porsche 918 Spyder -- Interview with Frank Walliser -- ExceIIence Link

    Smiley SmileySmiley


    Re: 918 latest news

    nberry:
    fritz:
    nberry:

    Whoopsy, I also posted his initial article on the 918 and he loved the car.

    Fritz, I can only guess what you may be alluding to.cheeky Whatever it is, it can't be good.

    OK, Nick. I'll explain it to put you out of your misery: 

    AdamR's post read:

    "nberry:
    I guess some think there should be an asterisk next to the 918 Ring time.

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304475004579276273923452640

    AdamR: Oh, god, why do I always read the comments?  A few of them are painfully dumb. "

     
    You obviously thought that Adam was referring to your comment when using the expression "painfully dumb", when in fact he meant the string of comments from others under the article in the WSJ's web site, so your feeling of being affronted by Adam's post was totally misplaced.
    Just another instance of the misunderstandings which so frequently arise in the internet which can sometimes be quite funny for an observer. 

    Adam, I guess I am the one reading challenged. I owe you an apology. My bad and I hope you stay warm during the extreme cold front hitting your area.

    Fritz, thank you for making it right. But of course it had to be you.indecision

    Haha, it's no problem!  As a side note, I recently moved to Kentucky for work, so no -15 F here!


    --



    Re: 918 latest news

    Whoopsy:
    nberry:

    Adam, are you reading challenged? I posted an article by one of the foremost auto reviewer who has won a Pulitzer prize for his work. He is the one that claimed an asterisk should be placed next to the 918 Ring time.

    Get your fact straight before you make a lame attempt to insult someone.Smiley

     

    Do you remember what his Pulitzer is for? Criticism!! He has to find faults anywhere to justify his award.

    I am actually surprised he didn't say the 918 sucks because it didn't have 2 back seats, or it doesn't have 12in of ground clearance. Or it doesn't have massage function on the chairs. 

    It does not have 2 back seats? Dammit. Now I hate the 918. Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 991 Turbo S, Porsche Boxster S (981), BMW X3 35d (2013)


    Re: 918 latest news

    Interesting but I guess unsurprising thoughts from Walter Rohl in recent interview:

    You have, of course, been heavily involved in the development of the new 918 Spyder, as you were with the Carrera GT. Which is your personal favourite?
    "If I have to choose for a future car, I would take the Carrera GT. The car is slower, and it is much more difficult to drive, but it's more how I expect the car to be."The 918 is something highly sophisticated; it's very fast, it's very easy to drive, but it doesn't give you the same feeling as the Carrera GT. Of course if somebody is asking me which to buy, I will always tell them: take the 918. With it, your life is easier, and your life is safer. But the sound of the 10-cylinder; this alone is something which is unique!"


    --



     

    3.9  GT2 2011 make over


    Re: 918 latest news

    TB993tt:

    Interesting but I guess unsurprising thoughts from Walter Rohl in recent interview:

    You have, of course, been heavily involved in the development of the new 918 Spyder, as you were with the Carrera GT. Which is your personal favourite?
    "If I have to choose for a future car, I would take the Carrera GT. The car is slower, and it is much more difficult to drive, but it's more how I expect the car to be."The 918 is something highly sophisticated; it's very fast, it's very easy to drive, but it doesn't give you the same feeling as the Carrera GT. Of course if somebody is asking me which to buy, I will always tell them: take the 918. With it, your life is easier, and your life is safer. But the sound of the 10-cylinder; this alone is something which is unique!"


    Still,

    Walter Röhrl is not comparable to the average customer regarding his skills and expectations on a car. He obviously favours the Carrera 3.2 and 964 RS which certainly are not the newest cars in Porsche´s lineup. I can actually imagine, being an entirely different concept of car, that the value of the CGT will increase steadily in the upcoming future.

    On a side note, I would actually love to know, regarding railcars, what he would say about the current crop of cars and which car, no matter which decade or generation, is the most appealing to drive.


    Re: 918 latest news

    Not so wise a comment from Rohl. I am guessing his star is fading a bit at Porsche….


    Re: 918 latest news

    I found it spot on - Walter is a LEGEND in times when the DRIVER made a bigger difference than today. He's view is consistent as he likes to "drive" and not be "driven" by the electronics. There are cars out there not for the average driver - and that is good so !


    Re: 918 latest news

    Wonderbar:

    Not so wise a comment from Rohl. I am guessing his star is fading a bit at Porsche….

    He is honest and of course he is right. He also called the "simple" GT3 the only real track machine for him, "condemning" the GT2 and GT2 RS as some sort of toys for managers. Smiley

    It is refreshing to see and hear that he is still free to say and think what he wants, despite his involvement with Porsche development. It is also my understanding that he loves the new 991 Turbo S (and this is not something I made up), I heard that it replaced his former Carrera 4S as a daily driver. Of course he loves the Carrera GT, he owns one and crashed one, so this car is kind of a challenge for him and believe me, not many cars are a challenge for Walter Röhrl. Take Adrian Sutil for example, he is in love with his Carrera GT too. The Carrera GT is and will always be a very special car in the Porsche model family.

    I drove a Carrera GT on several occasions but I get Walter Röhrl's points quite well and the Rodas/Walker accident actually makes another point. If I had the money right now, I would always choose the 918 over the Carrera GT. The Carrera GT is something special for special people with special skills or people who can actually enjoy the car without getting at the limit of it. I would probably kill myself in a Carrera GT if I would own one because at some point, I would try to get to the limit and this is not a forgiving car. Too much stress for me at my age, I just don't want to be every weekend on the track and leave my family at home just to keep up my ego (and necessary driving skills). I know a guy in Munich who owns a Carrera GT and drives maybe a couple of times per year in summer around lake Starnberg. Slow, just enjoying the sound of the engine and the looks of the people. I get that too but this is not me.

    The 918 is almost perfect in my opinion. I'm not a fan of the hybrid because it makes the car heavier but what Porsche achieved with this car is just phenomenal in my opinion. Also they ask much less money for it than Ferrari or McLaren, making the 918 actually the "affordable" super sports car. Furthermore, this car has a less "in your face" design than the competitors and you can even have a good feel about the fuel consumption and overall environmental impact, not that it really matters to owners. This car is a technical masterpiece, a real statement from Porsche. If I only had the money for the 918, oh boy... Smiley


    --

    RC (Germany) - Rennteam Editor Porsche 991 Turbo S, Porsche Boxster S (981), BMW X3 35d (2013)


    Re: 918 latest news

    Totally agree...it quite refreshing see someone in his position, say what we wants and not what someones want to hear ! 


    Re: 918 latest news

    Hmm...Mark Webber has a GT2RS.....just saying.


    Re: 918 latest news

    With the pace RC is changing his car's none would/will last very long


    Re: 918 latest news

    Ferdie & RC:  Very well expressed, entirely agree. I (among others) spent three days with Walter  Röhrl during the 40 Years Carrera RS event in Stuttgart last year and I just know he  is an outstanding person , honest and candid. When someone above is saying that he is a fading star because he prefers the CGT to the 918 that  it is truly disrespectful to a person that dedicated an important part of his life in developing Porsches and in the process doing this extremely well.   


    --

    911 Club Coupe, 993 4S Riviera Blau, 12' Audi S4 Avant


    Re: 918 latest news

    m4ever:

    Ferdie & RC:  Very well expressed, entirely agree. I (among others) spent three days with Walter  Röhrl during the 40 Years Carrera RS event in Stuttgart last year and I just know he  is an outstanding person , honest and candid. When someone above is saying that he is a fading star because he prefers the CGT to the 918 that  it is truly disrespectful to a person that dedicated an important part of his life in developing Porsches and in the process doing this extremely well.   


    Smiley


    Re: 918 latest news

    m4ever:

    When someone above is saying that he is a fading star because he prefers the CGT to the 918 that  it is truly disrespectful to a person that dedicated an important part of his life in developing Porsches and in the process doing this extremely well.   

    I think that Wonderbar was just suggesting that that there might be a little dissonance between Porsche and Walter for him to express views which might not exactly correspond with the "party line", but the fact is that he has always been his own man and spoken his own mind with only limited regard for what PR people might ideally like to hear coming out of his mouth.  Smiley
    The bottom line is that the people who pay him know how much he really is worth because journalists respect him both for his plain speaking and his ability to demonstrate what cars are capable of, and they have to accept his independent attitude. 


    --

    fritz


    Re: 918 latest news

    fritz:
    m4ever:

    When someone above is saying that he is a fading star because he prefers the CGT to the 918 that  it is truly disrespectful to a person that dedicated an important part of his life in developing Porsches and in the process doing this extremely well.   

    I think that Wonderbar was just suggesting that that there might be a little dissonance between Porsche and Walter for him to express views which might not exactly correspond with the "party line", but the fact is that he has always been his own man and spoken his own mind with only limited regard for what PR people might ideally like to hear coming out of his mouth.  Smiley
    The bottom line is that the people who pay him know how much he really is worth because journalists respect him both for his plain speaking and his ability to demonstrate what cars are capable of, and they have to accept his independent attitude. 

    It is also not problem that he speaks quite openly about his views as most of his audience will easily notice the small difference in skill/talent between Röhrl and themselves Smiley


     
    Edit

    Forum

    Board Subject Last post Rating Views Replies
    Porsche Sticky SUN'S LAST RUN TO WILSON, WY - 991 C2S CAB LIFE, END OF AN ERA 6/21/17 5:40 PM
    nberry
    233206 1466
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New 991.2 GT3 (2017) 6/23/17 5:05 PM
    GaussM
    97208 1683
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New Panamera (2016) 6/6/17 3:07 PM
    JR-550
    93112 1122
    Porsche Sticky 992 (Next 911 generation 2019/2020) 5/28/17 9:39 PM
    noone1
    26340 263
    Porsche Sticky Porsche Mission E - the future of Porsche? 6/9/17 7:53 AM
    RCA
    16121 100
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: Panamera Sport Turismo expands the Panamera model line 6/18/17 8:22 AM
    ISUK
    11066 121
    Porsche Sticky OFFICIAL: New 991.2 Turbo S Exclusive Series (2017) 6/21/17 11:33 AM
    Leawood911
    6014 76
    Porsche 918 latest news 6/23/17 5:43 PM
    Carlos from SpainM
    514597 5553
    Porsche 991 GT3 RS 5/27/17 7:11 PM
    RCA
    392424 5152
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 2016 Porsche Carrera 911 [991.2] Facelift 3/24/17 12:49 PM
    RCA
    235218 1382
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 911 R (2016) 5/23/17 8:08 PM
    noone1
    230832 2468
    Porsche 997 GT3 RS 4.0 3/15/17 10:40 PM
    noone1
     
     
     
     
     
    220180 737
    Porsche Cayman GT4 6/20/17 11:09 AM
    RCA
    185793 2345
    Porsche 991 GT2 RS (2017) - Rumors, speculations and gossip 6/20/17 4:54 PM
    RCA
    154753 1515
    Porsche The moment I've been waiting for... 5/12/17 12:53 PM
    Pilot
     
     
     
     
     
    145614 861
    Porsche OFFICIAL: New 991.2 Turbo and Turbo S 6/19/17 7:47 AM
    RCA
    145352 1002
    Ferrari 488 GTB/GTS 3/14/17 8:25 PM
    DaveGordon
    121966 1160
    Porsche 991.2 GT3 Thread Closed 3/7/17 11:47 AM
    RCA
    112208 1651
    Others McLaren on a winning streak 6/20/17 2:48 PM
    MKSGRM
    102542 2177
    Porsche Collected my 997 GTS today 1/22/17 7:32 AM
    BiTurbo
     
     
     
     
     
    98915 801
    Others Alfa Romeo 4C 8/3/16 7:37 AM
    Lars997M
    97887 698
    Porsche Boxster Spyder (981) 6/7/17 10:12 PM
    crayphile
    94112 667
    Others Audi R8 V10 Plus (2016 model) - Review (updated Feb 13th 2017) 6/23/17 1:25 PM
    Integra
    85017 1550
    Ferrari Ferrari F12 Berlinetta / 599 GTO Successor 6/14/17 3:19 PM
    Topspeed
    73736 689
    Porsche OFFICIAL: 718 Boxster (2016) 2/15/17 7:50 AM
    dreamcar
    71381 652
    Others VW caught cheating emissions tests 9/27/16 12:57 PM
    W8MM
    69242 860
    Porsche Porsche 991.2 Carrera S (Facelift) - Short Driving Report 11/16/16 9:20 PM
    DaveC
    64228 273
    Porsche 991 GTS 4/3/17 4:27 PM
    bluelines
    58181 247
    Porsche OFFICIAL: Cayenne (958) Facelift 2014 3/2/17 4:22 PM
    RCA
    55247 163
    Porsche Panamera 2016 (Gen.2) Thread Closed 6/29/16 9:52 AM
    RCA
    54798 608
    392 items found, displaying 1 to 30.